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Topic: Teaching Crochet to Girl Scout Daisies  (Read 3613 times)
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hbrady99
« on: January 25, 2011 06:26:24 AM »

I know there's already a few threads about teaching crochet, but I was wondering if anyone ever taught it to Girl Scouts to earn a badge?  My daughter is a Daisy- so they are Kindergartener and First Graders- little'uns!  I was wondering what the best project would be.  I want to put together a little kit for them to take home- including a larger sized hook and some yarn, I'm thinking the Sugar and Cream (good color choice, inexpensive, and durable).  If anyone has done this, what was your plan of attack?  I figure just chains and single crochet- but then I think the kit is limited to making a washcloth.  I guess that's not the worst thing in the world- at least they can use it- even as a doll blanket  Grin
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peihan17
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2011 07:03:36 AM »

I've never taught crochet to little kids, but their little nimble fingers will probably pick it up pretty quickly!  Some thoughts:

Don't give them hooks that are too much larger than recommended- it makes the crochet all floppy and even harder.  I made this mistake when trying to teach my husband  Embarrassed

Not sure if Sugar n Cream is the best idea- the plies tend to split easily, which might be annoying if the kids aren't sure where to put their hook in the first place.  And the colors aren't as bright.  Maybe a cheap acrylic like Red Heart?  Acrylic is cheap and durable and can be much softer than cotton.  Or even a big bulky yarn so then they can use a big hook (and the work will go faster!)?  They have those huge 5lb balls at my local craft store but I can't remember what they're called.

Also, if the goal is to make a washcloth, they probably won't need whole skeins.  Maybe split each skein in to balls for each girl so you can splurge on nicer/more yarn?

Good luck, it sounds like it'll be a ton of fun Smiley
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mommycrochets
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2011 09:59:18 AM »

I have tried teaching many kids to crochet and I start off with simple chains made with the fingers, alot of times they don't get beyond the chain. They could always make a bunch of chains and tie them onto hair ties, necklaces and bracelets or decorating a room with them.
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« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2011 10:21:01 AM »

I have tried teaching many kids to crochet and I start off with simple chains made with the fingers, alot of times they don't get beyond the chain. They could always make a bunch of chains and tie them onto hair ties, necklaces and bracelets or decorating a room with them.

I was gonna say that.

My cousin was...7?  When she learned to crochet.  She learned with a big plastic hook and some red heart.  And she did the finger trick too.

I recommend the chain.  And possibly the single crochet.  That is, if they get the chain down well enough.
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msdrey30
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2011 06:28:41 PM »

i know when i was a brownie, my mom was the troop leader and she taught us how to hand crochet a chain. basically hold the loop on one hand and pull through with the other hand. we all loved it. i hope i explained that ok lol
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« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2011 03:34:38 PM »

Wow... when did the Girl Scouts change their names? Last I knew, these young'uns were called Brownies! Hehe!
I don't have much experience with kindergartners and first graders, so I'm not sure how high their learning curves are... so, I would suggest maybe going an even cheaper and easier to learn route with finger knitting. All you need are your fingers and a good length of yarn. They could make small scarves for their dolls and stuff ^_^ It's just a much less frustrating craft to start out with!

Good luck with helping them get their crafting badges!
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hbrady99
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2011 04:12:40 PM »

Hmm- didn't think about that with the Sugar and Cream yarn- cheapy Super Saver it is!!!!! 

I've done the finger chain thingy- I'll have to keep that as Plan #2.  They'll probably like that just as much.  Plus the meeting is only an hour- and they HAVE to have snack- so I'm not sure what kind of time I'll be given.  I guess if they really like it- it will go more than one week.  The girls are kinda excited- my daughter is always coming in with things I've made her.  I think they think they'll be making fingerless gloves and hats too.

I learned when I was 4- which absolutely blows my mind now!  How my mom taught me- I have no idea.  And the first thing I made was a Barbie purse.  I've been trying on and off for a few years with my daughter- but she's a very active kid.  I was always 'give me a book, I'm good to go'.

Now is finger knitting different than finger crocheting?Huh?

Thanks for all the help!   Grin
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peihan17
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2011 04:28:20 PM »

I have no idea if there's a difference between finger crocheting and knitting since I haven't done either (but now I kinda want to try!) Smiley  Maybe do the finger chain the first week/hour, and try a project with hooks the following week?  That way even if they don't get the hook part, they already have something they know and a project to bring home.  The one thing I have learned from working with little kids is that if you can bring something home, it's awesome.  Otherwise, meh Smiley

tcmatteson, as far as I remember, Daisies are even younger than Brownies, like kindergarten-ish.  I started as a Brownie and that was definitely some time in elementary school, so at least first grade.
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RosyPosy
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2011 07:00:53 PM »

WARNING: bad idea!

I tried to teach some Daisies to crochet about a year ago. It was a disaster. Most of them couldn't figure out how pull the loop through and it ended up in a big mess. A big problem was they were splitting the yarn. I think they were just too young to understand how to do it. If you really really want to try, I suggest using a material that won't split. Ribbon, maybe? I know ribbon can be expensive so maybe something else (plarn? mayhaps?)

I also taught some older girls (Juniors) to crochet and they understood it much better. I suggest waiting a few years for the girls to grow up a little before attempting to teach them.

Don't let me dissuade you; it's up to you. I think it'd be really cool for them if they could figure it out. Maybe it'll work better if  you brought some adults who already know how to crochet with you. When I did it, none of the leaders knew anything about crochet. I spent more time teaching them then the girls!
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« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2011 08:58:57 PM »

Now is finger knitting different than finger crocheting?Huh?
Pretty much. The technique is known as finger knitting, finger crocheting, and finger weaving ^_^ There are lots of tutorials on the web all with different ways to do the simple process. Here's how I learned.

Materials: ball of yarn (the thicker the better) and your own two hands

1. Make a slip knot in the yarn and place over your thumb; pull tight but not so much as to cut off circulation.
2. With your palm facing you (the hand with the yarn tied to it), run the yarn behind your forefinger, in front of your middle finger, behind your ring finger, and in front of your pinky. Continue wrapping around the pinky, then in front of your ring finger, behind your middle finger, and in front of your forefinger. Wrap around the forefinger, in front of your middle finger, behind your ring finger, and in front of your pinky.
3. Looking at your hand with your palm facing you, you should see two rows of yarn over your pinky and middle fingers. Take the bottom loop and lift it up and off those fingers so that now all you see is one loop of yarn over each finger.
4. Continue wrapping the yarn behind your pinky, in front of your ring finger, behind your middle finger, and in front of your forefinger.
5. You'll now see two loops of yarn over your ring and fore fingers. Take the bottom loop and lift it up and off those fingers so that now all you see is one loop of yarn over each finger.
6. Take the slip knot off your thumb and let it hang for right now.
7. Continue wrapping the yarn behind your forefinger, in front of your middle finger, behind your ring finger, and in front of your pinky.
8. You'll now see two loops of yarn over your pinky and middle fingers. Take the bottom loop and lift it up and off those fingers so that now all you see is one loop of yarn over each finger.

Continue this pattern until you get the length you would like.

Finishing off (much like casting off in knitting or in tunisian crochet):
1. Cut the yarn end so that it's a couple inches in length.  Take off the loop from the finger furthest from the working yarn and hold on to the loop and take off the loop from the finger next to it. Put the second loop through the first loop. You can let go of the first loop and hold on to the second loop. Take off the loop from the third finger and put it through the second loop. Let go of the second loop and hold on to the third loop. Take the loop from the last finger and put that through the third loop. Pull the end yarn through the fourth loop twice, knotting it in the second pass through.
2. Pull the slip knot out of the yarn and then weave in the ends!

Once you get the pattern down, it's really simple to do and takes very little time to create something fairly long. Just make sure you let them know that they shouldn't pull the yarn tight around their little fingers. We don't want anybody cutting off circulation!
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