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Topic: Help with a circle  (Read 1671 times)
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Sadi27
« on: October 24, 2010 01:58:06 PM »

Hello, I'm trying to crochet a cape type thing. I have one, it's basically a circle but has buttons all down the front of it. I don't really get how I can make a circle with a split in it. Do I start off with a x amount of chains and then crochet backwards and forwards increasing until I get a circle? How make increases would I need? I want it to be a perfect circle rather than hexagonal or with lots of straight edges. I would appreciate any help I can get  Smiley. Patterns would be great  Grin


Sorry if i've confused anyone and thanks for any help!
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« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2010 02:04:16 PM »

i would have thought that working like a for a circle, but in rows rather than rounds
so increases would be done in the same way
example
row1 = 6 stitches
row2 = 12 stitches (inc in each one)
row3 = 18 stitches (inc in every other stitch)
row4 = 24 stitches (inc in every 3rd stitch)
row5 = 30 stitches (inc in every 4th stitch)
and so on and so forth
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fantasticmio
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« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2010 02:21:33 PM »

The trick to making it a circle instead of a hexagon (sc), octagon (hdc) or a dodecagon (dc) is to stagger your increases.

What I mean is, make sure the increases within one row/round are equally spaced apart, but also make sure that they aren't on top of the increases you did in the previous row/round. 

Here's an example in sc:


In the example on the left, I did my increases on top of the increases in the round before; that's what makes it look like a hexagon.

In the example on the right, I staggered the increases, and that gave me a circle.


As for making one with a slit, I agree with Selnith, you could probably use any circle pattern but instead of joining the rounds, turn around and go back.

Her numbers are for sc stitches.  If you're going to use hdc, you need to start with 8 stitches and increase by 8 stitches every round.  For dc, you need to start with 12 and increase by 12 every round.

Of course, everyone crochets differently, so, while these numbers should work, there's a chance they might not.  If the project is cupping into a bowl shape, you don't have enough increases - add more.  If the project is ruffling, then you have too many stitches - do fewer increases.
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Sadi27
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2010 02:59:55 PM »

Thank you for the replies and the help. I will try the method that you suggested Smiley. x
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« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2011 11:37:40 PM »

I am terribly sorry to bump and old thread. But I would like to know where you staggered your increases on that perfect circle, fantasticmio! It is exactly what I have been trying to do in hat making! Did you just go one past the previous increase? Did you still do the same number of sc between each increase?
Kristi
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fantasticmio
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« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2011 12:11:48 AM »

I kept the increases evenly spaced (so, the same number of stitches between them as a pattern would say).

I tried to put the increases as far away from the previous round's increases as possible... of course, this gets easier the more rounds you do.

I think if you always went 1 stitch further, you might end up with some kind of spiraling pattern... but I'd have to try it to make sure!

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« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2011 08:43:01 AM »

I will just have to play around then. Thanks!
(if you wanted to post your pattern for the purple circle, I wouldn't mind! *grin*)
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« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2011 09:38:35 AM »

For any circle pattern, you have a repeat of a bunch of stitches plus an increase.  For a circle made of sc stitches, you'll have 6 repeats.  For hdc, you'll have 8 repeats.  For dc you'll have 12 repeats.

The number of stitches (including increases), in each repeat will be equal the number of the round you're on.

Example:

Round 1 = 1 sc (repeat 6 times)  {you'd never see it written this way, but this is what is it... 6 sc worked into a loop)

Round 2: 2sc into 1 sc  (repeat 6 times)

Round 3: 1sc into 1, 2sc into 1 (repeat 6 times)

At this point I start counting my stitches like so:

Round 4: 1 2-3 4 (where stitch 2 and 3 are made into the same stitch, as indicated by the dash) 6 times

Round 5 could be: 1 2 3 4-5 (6 times)

Round 6 could be: 1 2-3 4 5 6 (6 times)

Round 7 could be: 1 2 3 4 5-6-7 (6 times)

I say "could be" because I'm not actually making a circle right now, so I'm only guessing where the increases will go.  What I do, while making it, after round 4, is to look at where I'm putting the next group of stitches.  Where can I put the increase so that it's not on top of the last?  Once you have that figured out for the first group, you can do the same pattern of regular stitches and increases 5 more times.

I really do count the stitches that way, too... say "one two three four-five".  If you think you won't be able to remember this as you go (I had problems with remembering when I first tried this... and almost always on really big rounds), you can always write it down.

My short hand might be:

Round 32: 12-13

Meaning, on round 32 (where there are 32 stitches before you repeat), stitches 12 and 13 are made into the same stitch.

Hopefully this isn't too confusing!
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