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Topic: Llamas, a hand spindel, and a HOME MADE WHEEL!  (Read 4609 times)
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LilySnape
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Joined: 27-Apr-2009

"One psychopath per TARDIS, don't you think?"


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« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2010 03:27:19 AM »

That wheel is amazing!!!  And I love the pink hat.  Smiley 
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"I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high functioning sociopath. Do your research." - Sherlock
angorarabbit
« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2011 09:13:43 AM »

that wheel came out beautifully! Perhaps instructions are in order... :-D PLEASE! lol!
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"You know, drug dealers and you fiber people deal in the same lexicon.  You're all buying pounds to sell by the ounce." -- My Husband
ClothoYarns
« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2011 09:03:50 AM »

4) Is a Navajo ply yarn always so...bumpy?
i can only say from my own yarn, but yes, it always has those little irregular places where you chain it at, but i don't notice them at all when i'm crocheting or knitting, and with practice you can get them smaller and smaller!
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nykohchyn
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2011 12:39:51 AM »

Wheel How-To:

Lumber:
a large, round medallion (it is not perfectly round and we DO need to fix that but it suffices),
2x4 about 3 feet tall
one 1x2 about 6 feet long
dowels both round and square, the square about .75 inches to an inch
2 1x4's about 4 feet long each
two or three packages of those little wooden disks about 3 inches wide from the wood working section of the craft store (I missed the center, cracked them drilling too fast, made the hole in the center too big...get extra for mistakes. Use the remainder and a dowel to make a spindle!) and two packages of the 2.75 inch ones that are a little thicker

Hardware:
wood screws
2 heavy-duty hinges
large washers...we ended up needing a total of 9.
Two weird bolts that I don't know the name for...it is about 6.5 inches long, and it is smooth to maybe the last inch, where it is threaded. It is about as thick as my pinkie finger (one about...5/16 inch? the other about 1/4 inch) We had to file these smooth...they will be used as an axle, so be sure you have VERY straight ones with very very few bumpy bits and file and polish them as smooth as you can. THIS IS IMPORTANT.
a bearing stolen from a skateboard wheel
cup hooks and other small hooks
another smaller, shorter bolt, only needs to be long enough to go through the footman and into the wheel and maybe a couple of washers for spacing
some nylon tubing
fishing wire
drive band (I found it best to just buy a real spinning wheel drive band)

Instructions:
He cut the 1x4s into two pieces about 18 inches long, and three about 12 inches...was not reeeeaaally scientific about it, just made sure that matching pieces were the same. These he assembled into a shape like this: |_| 
He put the second 1x4x12 on the back, top of this base, as a place to put the back post, supporting it with two small pieces of the 2x4 (reinforcing yay!).

He put this in front of me and measured the back post to a height I liked and cut it there.

I found the approximate center of the wheel, and he drilled a big hole in it and stuck the bearing from the skateboard wheel inside. Drilled a hole in the back post, and stuck the long bolt through with washers: bolt, washer, wheel, washer, washer, post, washer, washer, nut.
At this point comes the first tricky part: We used a dremel to cut a groove in the side of the wheel, wide and deep enough to seat the drive band. BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL WITH THIS PART. If it isn't perfect, your band will throw.

The mother-of-all was hard, too. It is a |__| shape with the far side a little taller than the other, with a little divot carved into the short side (the orifice sits here) and a hole drilled in the taller side (the back of the flyer axle rests in this hole and needs to spin freely). Mount this on top of the back post. It is fiddly...we had to adjust and fidget and remake the mother of all and the flyer about six times. I will take pictures and post them, I can NOT explain it well enough. This is pretty exacting and complicated and it took us almost 3 weeks to get it right.

We used a Bic pen with the ends cut off (remove the ink FIRST! Haha) and the little wooden disks to make the bobbin. Make sure it rotates freely on the "axle" bolt for the flyer assembly. I also used a straw, to make a second bobbin. VERY VERY CAREFULLY dremel a tiiiiny groove in the side of one of the disks on the end. This will be for the tension band. IT MUST BE PERFECT; again, it will throw if it is not. We used a little spring attached to a little eye bolt on the left hand side of the mother-of-all, and tied fishing wire to this. Another eye bolt attaches to either side of the mother-of-all further back, under the end of the bobbin, so it lines up with the groove, and the fishing wire goes through the first, over the bobbin, and through the second. Wrap it around a cup hook for tension.

To make the flyer whorl, we drilled a hole in the center of one of the 2.75 inch disks, and shoved a nut in the hole, then sandwiched that between two of the 3 inch disks with super glue (looks sort of like a wooden Oreo). That way it screws onto the end of the flyer, and the drive band sits in the groove created by the smaller disk in the center.

The flyer itself is a little strip of wood with two dowels shoved in, and the axle (glued!) through the center so it looks like a trident. Little hooks (make sure there are no snaggy bits on them) screwed into one of the dowel-arms guide the yarn onto the bobbin. MAKE SURE THE DOWELS ARE SHORTER THAN THE AXLE and slightly shorter than the bobbin. Makes a mess if it isn't. Big mess. Much cussing happened. Ha. The orifice is a little piece of PVC pipe, about an inch long, with a hole drilled in the side of it. This is attached to the head of the bolt you are using for the axle...just wedge it on there and glue it in place. Bent paper clips (straighten them out then bend them into a u) hold it down on the shorter end of the mother-of-all, in the divot, so the hole in the side is BEHIND the post. Oil evvvvvrrrrryyyyythhiiinnngg that moves. Then oil it again.

The treadle assembly was pretty easy. Cut the 1x1 square dowel to fit inside the base, so that it sort of wedges in there...use it to complete the fourth side of the base, so it makes a rectangle. Reinforce with extra little pieces so it is sturdy. Use a piece of the 1x2 to make the footman...needs to be about 12-inches-ish. Mount the third 1x4x12 on this with the hinges (open ends facing INTO the wheel). Attach a little piece of the nylon tubing to this, and join it with the footman. Screw the footman off-center on the wheel, so it moves the wheel when you push the treadle down!

Did I miss anything? Pictures to come as soon as I find the stupid cord for the stupid camera...stupid ferrets keep stealing stuff. It only HAPPILY spins one direction (clockwise), but it can be talked into spinning the other way. It isn't perfect, and it makes a "whoosh-brush-squeak" noise when it is spinning, but the sound is somehow reminiscent of the noise my Mom's sewing machine used to make and it is soothing to me. Everything took lots of fiddling and adjusting and every piece on it has been redone at least twice. The basic instructions are easy, and the initial build time was about 9 hours including the hardware store trip. Finished product, capable of making yarn, took us...not kidding...SIX WEEKS of working on it ALL of our spare time, which admittedly was not much spare time...probably total 100 hours of work? give or take a little.
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nykohchyn
« Reply #14 on: February 01, 2011 01:22:49 AM »

Photos post one:













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