A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Cookie Policy | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
News from Internet Brands:
Closing the Craftster Community on December 19, 2019.
Read the details here.
Total Members: 318,835
Currently Running With Scissors:
386 Guests and 10 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides


Pages: [1]
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Fimo Christmas Ornaments - including Futurama Santa  (Read 10172 times)
Tags for this thread: futurama , tv  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit  
soxymoron
« on: November 30, 2008 11:52:21 AM »

I'm still VERY new at polymer clay so any feedback is welcome. These need threading and they'll be ready to put on the tree. For scale they're leaning against a dvd box (edge on).

A penguin



Robot santa from Futurama



His belt buckle is a bit humongous.

Hopefully more to come. Let me know what you think.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Diane B.
Offline Offline

Posts: 5067
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2008 02:26:05 PM »

..
Very cute!

Quote
I'm still VERY new at polymer clay so any feedback is welcome.

What are you "threading" them on?  I don't see any connectors are the top of the sculpts.  If you don't already know some ways of putting loops and U's at the top of things you want to "dangle," there are various ways discussed on this page of my polymer clay "encyclopedia" site:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/pendants_cording.htm
...click on Top Loops

If they turn out to be a little heavy for the tree, you can always make future ones over an armature of tightly-wadded aluminum foil or with Sculpey's Ultralight clay for less weight (not Sculpey, SuperSculpey-flesh, or Sculpey III though anyway since there are thin and/or projecting areas on these which would easily get broken off using those clays).

Be sure and post more!

Diane B.

P.S.  Love your screen name!  Grin
« Last Edit: November 30, 2008 02:28:25 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
soxymoron
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2008 01:50:53 AM »

I just cocktail sticked a hole through the hats when they were still soft, planning to thread thread through there. After reading that though I might find some wire hooks to use instead, I think they would look better. These are small enough to not weigh too much but if I was doing anything much bigger I would definately use a tin foil base. I'm thinking about varnishing these, do you think that's a good idea? And if so what should I use? I was thinking of PVA. I was also thinking of getting normal baubles and adding bits to them, would they be okay in the oven? Thanks.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Diane B.
Offline Offline

Posts: 5067
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2008 12:26:07 PM »

Quote
I just cocktail sticked a hole through the hats when they were still soft, planning to thread thread through there. After reading that though I might find some wire hooks to use instead, I think they would look better.

Oh, I see (or rather, I couldn't see...lol). 
Generally holes are made in the clay by pushing/drilling a pointed toothpick or needletool, etc., into the clay while it's raw, but polymer clay does soften when heated so what you did works too in many situations. (Holes can also be made after the clay is cool, but then usually a drill bit, reamer, or red-hot pin is used, etc.)

Using a top loop (an eye pin, etc., or even an eye screw) or an upside-down U shape (like the clipped-off end of a paperclip, or other wire) instead of a hole might also allow the figures to hang a little straighter when the ornament hook is added, depending on where you've made your holes, and using those would also avoid the problem of the baked clay breaking around the hole if you use a weaker brand of polymer clay (Sculpey III, SuperSculpey-flesh, orig. Sculpey).

(The section on Loops & Holes on the page I linked to before also has info on several ways of making holes in already-baked clay to insert eyepins, U's, etc.)

Quote
I'm thinking about varnishing these, do you think that's a good idea? And if so what should I use? I was thinking of PVA.

Polymer clay doesn't need sealing at all, but if you just want to give the surface or a part of the surface a glossy finish (and don't want to "sand and buff" to do that), you can use certain types of acrylic sealer. 
PVA (or permanent white glue) is fine but will be a bit more scratchable than a polyurethane or the cyanoacrylate floor polishes (Future-Pledge, etc) that are most often used by clayers for that glossing or sealing things on that might tarnish or fall off. 
We do have to be careful not to use petroluem-solvent based finishes and paints directly on polymer clay though. 
Other kinds of clear finishes that are fine are the few sold expressly for polymer clay (more expensive, and sometimes not better), clear acrylic fingernail polish, and more scratchable things like acyrlic mediums and clear embossing powders, as well as epoxy resins.

You can read all about the finishes used on polymer clay in these previous threads:
https://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=190875.msg2005953#msg2005953
https://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=273974.msg3096293#msg3096293
And much more re all the possibilities, application methods, etc., on the Finishes page at my site:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/finishes.htm

Quote
I was also thinking of getting normal baubles and adding bits to them, would they be okay in the oven?

Not sure what you mean by "normal baubles" but the basic rules for using polymer clay with other materials are heat-related and solvent-related. 
In other words, anything baked with the clay has to be able to tolerate the temps we use for curing polymer clay (some plastics are borderline, but can often be used if the temp is stringently moderated). Otherwise, those onlays, etc. can be pressed into the clay to create an exact impression, then be glued back into the impression after the clay is baked.  Materials like metal, glass, ceramic, wood, paper, most fabrics, leather, etc. are fine at our temps though...(some) plastics are mostly the problem, though even some clear acrylic sprays will have the wrong kind of solvent only in their propellants and cause problems.
The other issue has to do with the fact that polymer clay is a plastic itself, so substances that dissolve plastics can't be used directly on it (like "enamel" paints, clear finishes that clean up with paint-thinner, etc.).

There's loads of info on both the heat and the solvent-contact issues on these pages, if you want more info (or ask any specific question you want over the in the Polymer Clay Discussions & Questions board):
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/covering.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/finishes.htm (same page as above)
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/paints.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/storage.htm (this pg has more on the issue of direct contact since we also have to be careful what materials we store raw clay next to)

And if by baubles, you mean glass ball ornaments or any other ornaments made from glass or metal, etc., though, we do "cover" and/or embellish the balls with polymer clay all the time and it works well.
 If you want to check out many of those, and how they're done, look on this page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/Christmas.htm (click on Glass Ball Ornaments)
(as well as on the "Covering" page above, under the Glass category)


HTH,

Diane B.

P.S.  Another tip would be to be careful of thin, unsupported bits of clay like the arms on your Santa since after baking those could easily break off if stressed.  Even if you used a strong clay, you may not have a strong enough join, and you'd probably want to use a wire/etc. armature underneath anyway.  The arms on your penguin are fine though even though they're thin because they're pressed to the body so not projecting.
You may want to check out this category at my site too for making good joins in polymer clay, etc.:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/glues-Diluent.htm
(...click on Some Bonding Techniques)

.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2008 12:34:41 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
soxymoron
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2008 01:15:58 PM »

Thanks for all your help. I'll try making them shiny with some nail varnish - I'll let you know how it goes. Glass baubles were exactly what I meant, and those are some great examples, so I'll definately be trying some of those in the future too.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Diane B.
Offline Offline

Posts: 5067
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2008 03:11:35 PM »

Quote
I'll try making them shiny with some nail varnish . . .

Just remember that only acrylic nail polishes are okay to use on polymer clay. 
The other kind (sometimes called "enamel," or just not marked with a type) will eat into the clay making it sticky even up to six months later. 

The kind for acrylic fingernails should work though, and a few more are listed on my Finishes page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/finishes.htm
...click on the subcategory called Fingernail Polish, under the Other Acrylic-Water-Based Finishes category

Fingernail polishes won't go a long way on sculpts though unfortunately unless they're real miniatures.

Have fun!

Diane B.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2008 03:12:52 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
Gali
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2008 06:53:41 AM »

Aw, they're so cute!
I really liked the penguin, but if you look on his white belly, you'll see it has a little red stain on it.
Remember to always wash your hands thoroughly before working with fimo, because if you don't, all the little things you never know you had on your palm will stick to the pretty white fimo. (Happens to me all the time, unfortunately  Sad )
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Diane B.
Offline Offline

Posts: 5067
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2008 08:32:35 AM »

Quote
on his white belly, you'll see it has a little red stain . . . .

Or just sand that little bit of red off with fine-grit sandpaper or steel wool (then hand-buff a bit) when preventive measures** haven't been enough. Grin

Diane B.


** http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/sculpture.htm (click on White or Any Clay--Keeping Clean)

.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2008 08:34:35 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
soxymoron
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2008 10:08:50 AM »

Yeah I was having a bit of a problem with unwanted colour mixing - you can see a speck of gold on the santa where it should be red too. I'll try and sand them off, and just remember to keep things more seperated and cleaner. You can't really tell but I think most of the white is ever so slightly pink, not good.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search
Crafting Ideas
Crafting How-Tos
Crafting Ideas
Crafting Topics



Latest Blog Articles
Meal Prep Monday: Black Eyed Pea and Squash Soup
Craftster Featured Projects - Dedicated to the People Who Made It
Tute Tuesday: Paper Tree



Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Privacy Policy | Cookie Policy | Terms | Site Map

Copyright ©2003-2017, Craftster.org, © 2009-2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands