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Topic: am I doing this right?  (Read 2228 times)
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bigeyes
« on: July 15, 2007 12:45:30 PM »

I bought some poly clay molds, and I have been dusting them with baby powder to get the clay to pop out.

Is that the right way to do it, or is there a better way?

Also, I'm frustrated with my attempts to cover a frame with clay.  If I wrap it to the back side, no matter how I trim it, it looks 'homemade.'

But if I try to trim it level with the edge, is shrinks just enough to show.

Should I give up and paint the darn things, or completely cover it front and back?
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SupernovaDesigns
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2007 11:47:54 PM »

Corn starch is supposed to be easier to rinse off of the clay than talc based powders, like baby powder. it's probably cheaper too ^_^

I've only ever covered one large item with clay. I'll wait for Diane B to chime in on this one.
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Diane B.
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« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2007 09:35:20 AM »

Quote
I have been dusting them with baby powder to get the clay to pop out.
Is that the right way to do it, or is there a better way?

As Supernova mentioned, cornstarch (or other vegetable starches) is easier to rinse off the clay than real talcum powder (otoh, these days most "baby powders" are pure cornstarch since it's been discovered that finely-ground "rock powder" that gets into the air stays in babys' lungs  Roll Eyes ).
It's good to apply cornstarch with a fluffy brush, or even in a "pounce bag," to avoid getting excess amounts of it in the tiny crevices of a mold.
Another type of powder that works well, if it fits with your design, is Pearl Ex or other mica or real metal powders... or actually even chalk or any type of powder --those will definitely color the clay though.

Depending on which brand of clay you're using though, plain old water is another good release (not for the Fimos though because they have an additive that can absorb water and get a bit sticky).  You can mist the mold (or the clay), or you can wipe the mold with a damp cloth, etc. (some clayers have even been known to lick their molds in a pinch).  Water is fine on the outside of clay, but not inside it, so just dry the clay off if necessary if you want to put a powder or something on the clay before baking it.

Other things that can be used as releases in for molds or for "forms" btw are ArmorAll (nothing sticks to silicone though, so don't use this if you plan to glaze the clay later or add anything else where the ArmorAll was), glycerin, Vaseline, Kato's Repel Gel or another ca debonder, and physical separators just as metallic leaf or even paper for non-dimensional surfaces.  There's much more info on possible releases, and how to use them with clay on this page, if you want to check them out:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/molds.htm
(... click on Releases...)

Quote
I'm frustrated with my attempts to cover a frame with clay.
As for the frame, there's a page at my site that discusses various ways of covering frames (and even for making them entirely from clay):
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/frames-mirrors.htm
(The size frame you're making will matter in several ways though, and you don't mention what size you're dealing with.)

Quote
If I wrap it to the back side, no matter how I trim it, it looks 'homemade.'

Do you mean that even if you trim it so the back isn't covered at all, just the front and side, it looks homemade?  If so, why?  Are you not making the cuts straight enough, or what exactly is the problem?

Quote
But if I try to trim it level with the edge, is shrinks just enough to show.

Shrinkage is only a problem with polymer clay when it's a sufficiently large, flat expanse of clay.  Here's something from my Frames page that talks about that:

shrinkage (noticeable usually only in larger pieces)
....I did a piece which was supposed to have exactly 6" square tiles. 54 of them.  After the first 18 didn't fit quite perfectly in their places, I got wise!!  Anyway: All brands of clay can shrink. The ratio can be from 1% to 5%.
I found it depends on the softness/stickiness of the clay--how much solvent and plasticizer is present
.. thus, leached clay will shrink less than fresh clay.
...the thickness of the sheet seems to have an inverse relationship to shrinkage... so a thinner #4 or 5 sheet will shrink more than a # 1 sheet... I suppose this is some factor of resistance and "stretch"; ie. the thicker piece has more body to resist the force of inward shrinkage.
If what you are doing needs to be precise, I would suggest you either do a test piece and calculate your final cuts based on the shrinkage you find.
.... Or cut your piece slightly larger than what is needed and trim or sand down to fit after baking. Patti Kimle
. . . someone also said their tiles didn't shrink when sandwiched between two bathroom tiles (while baking, I assume)...


Another possibility, especially if your frame is flat,  is to create the clay sheet and bake it alone, then "veneer" it onto the frame with glue  (... it could be rebaked after the initial baking if you needed that, without further shrinkage, I think).  If the frame isn't flat, it could still be done, would just be more fiddly and you'd want to cool the clay before removing it from the frame to bake.
(for more info on "veneering" polymer clay, check out the Covering page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/covering.htm
(... click on Veneer Sheets near the bottom of the list at the top of the page...)


Quote
Should I give up and paint the darn things, or completely cover it front and back?

Large frames aren't the simplest things to do with polymer clay, but you can definitely do them in various ways if you're just aware of a few caveats.
(One of the lessons on my Frames & Mirrors page is for making a large thick frame, all clay front and back, but it's pretty darned complicated so I wouldn't advise that one for sure!)

(If you have questions not covered by that Frames page, let us know.)


Diane B.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2007 09:39:54 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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bigeyes
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2007 11:59:42 AM »

I'm cutting it even with the edge and then it shrinks just enough to show the frame through once it's baked.

so if I cut it  little large, when it's done I can just trim it off ?

That sounds about the easiest to me.  The inner edge is tricky because if it goes too far the glass piece won't fit on the ledge, but it isn't big enough the wooden part shows through.

The frames are just curved enough that I can't bake it flat and attach it later.  The first one that burned was so close to perfect it was dumb luck I guess.

I can't figure out if a template would work better than what I am doing.  I've been just putting a rectangle of clay over a section of the frame and trimming away the excess.

I can't find the information on leaching the clay.  I looked in the index under L and P (plasticizers)   

I'm thinking leaching some of the plasticizers out could help if i can just figure out how to do it.  Can I just roll it out and let it sit between  pieces of typing paper for a while?




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« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2007 09:28:45 AM »

Quote
.  .so if I cut it  little large, when it's done I can just trim it off ? That sounds about the easiest to me
. . . I've been just putting a rectangle of clay over a section of the frame and trimming away the excess.

You can cut the excess baked clay off while it's still warm (or make it warm again to do it... the softer clays may be more brittle even when warm, but don't know).  In this case, depending on how much excess is sticking out after baking and how thick it is, you'd probably use a pointed Xacto (using the edge as a guide) to make the cut, or a long but fairly rigid blade like a wallpaper scraper blade.  You can then sand the edge down to make it perfectly smooth and even, if it's not already, or you can just sand all the excess off in the first place. 
If you don't know about sanding (and possibly also buffing), and how to get rid of a whitish area after sanding, check out this page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/sanding_tumbling.htm
and maybe this one:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/buffing.htm

However, I'm wondering if you're using a layer of white glue underneath the clay (or a coat of acrylic paint).  The tacky glue (and the acrylic paint) helps the wood have more "tooth" for grabbing onto the raw clay, but it also acts as a heat buffer while baking (so that could help with the shrinking... but not sure).
(You can look on the Covering page for basic info on successfully covering all kinds of materials --wood, metal, glass, plastic, etc., too:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/covering.htm

Quote
The frames are just curved enough that I can't bake it flat and attach it later.


Well, you could do as I suggested before though and form the clay on the curved frame (perhaps with a release between them like paper or aluminum foil, or even cornstarch, etc.), cool it in the frig/freezer a while, then carefully remove and bake separately on something which will support the curve while baking (polyester stuffing, wads of tissues, pile of baking soda, etc.).  Then just glue it back on the frame later.

Quote
The first one that burned was so close to perfect it was dumb luck I guess.

If you were using the same brand and softness of clay, preheating and baking the same way (surface, oven, position, etc.), then it may have been luck... but being of scientific mind, I'm betting there was some factor that was different.   Smiley

Quote
I'm thinking leaching some of the plasticizers out could help if i can just figure out how to do it.


If you are now using a really soft clay like Sculpey or FimoSoft, then yes you'd probably get a much better result using a stiffer clay (FimoClassic, Kato, or even Premo --though if even one of those were an especially soft bar, it could be good to leach it too).  Most clayers I know don't use the softer/weaker clays, and haven't heard of many problems when covering frames (or things that weren't really large and flat), so that may turn out to be the main difference. (You still haven't mentioned the size of the frame you're trying to cover, so I still don't know how large we're talking about.)

Quote
I can't find the information on leaching the clay.  I looked in the index under L and P (plasticizers) 

 
If you mean at my site, the navigation bar there isn't really a true "index" (an index of my site in alphabetical order would be really-really long, and I've wanted to spend my time doing other things at the site instead). 

The alphabetical buttons on the left side of every page you're referring to function only as an alphabetical navigation bar.  The navigation bar lists all of the individual pages (90 or so) at the site only by their basic titles
However, if you don't already know which page a topic is discussed on, it's best to use the Table of Contents page instead (there's a button for it at the top of every alphabetical navigation bar).  The Table of Contents page lists not only every page at the site, but every sub-category on every one of those 90+ pages.
 
So ....you can browse the general topics on the Table of Contents page to see where a particular thing might be discussed.
Or better in many cases, you can use the Ctrl + f ("find") keyboard command, along with the word you're looking for, while you're on the  TOC page.  . . doing that will automatically take you to every spot on the page where the term is used. 
For example, if you held down Ctrl then pressed the F key, and entered the word leach or leaching in the little search box that comes up, and clicked "Find Next," you'd be immediately taken to the a subcategory with the word leaching in it under the Characteristics of Clay page listing; so you'd then know you'd need to click on the Characteristics page from the alphabetical navigation bar to actually go to the page and read the info. 
(In this case though, leaching is discussed most fully on the Conditioning page --which you'd have been taken to if you'd clicked "Find Next" a second time (...you might have had to check both pages to see which was better, but I'm just letting you know here that the Conditioning page is where you'll most likely get what you want... so click on it under C in the alphabetical nav. bar on the left side of the page).

(Doing a Google "Site Search" should work to find every use of a particular term on my site too, but Google doesn't crawl to the bottom of really long pages, and also the "Cached" version offered by Google of my site doesn't appear to be working right now  Cry.)



HTH,

Diane B.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2007 09:42:39 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
bigeyes
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2007 11:12:28 AM »

I actually followed the directions I got from your site. Smiley


It's a 5x7 wooden frame.  I used sculpey III because I liked the color selection.  It looks like I may have to switch to Kato or fimo and mix my own colors.  Nobody in my immediate area stocks it, so I have to mail order everything, and being a newbie I ordered the brand that had the best color selection.  Sad

Does Kato make a pearl, or am I going to have to mix mica in to make pearl shades?

I was wondering if there was any advantage to making things from white clay and painting them instead of sculpting from the colors? 

Also, I was mitering the corners on the frame, but if I'm putting little fish, mermaids, seaweed, etc. over it, is it really necessary to miter?  couldn't I just cut out a rectangle with another rectangle cutout in the center?  Are the 4 diagonal lines necessary at the corners? 

Now I'm wondering if I could just make a flat rectangle, decorate it, and glue it to the face of the frame....and that is totally NOT where I was going with that question! 

And I'm getting either an oval or a teardrop shaped cutter to make the scales for fish and mermaid tails, btw, after researching online the various ways to make scales.

diane, thanks for all your help!  I also have found that your site is so much easier to navigate when I switch over to evil internet explorer from mozilla.
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« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2007 11:10:09 AM »

Quote
I actually followed the directions I got from your site.


There are many-many directions on my site --even just on the Frames-Mirrors page -- so could you tell me exactly which directions you're referring to?  That would make discussing this a lot easier and more focused. 
Just copy and paste a bit of the exact text from those directions at my site into your next message so that I can find the specific thing you're following.

Quote
  I used sculpey III because I liked the color selection.  It looks like I may have to switch to Kato or fimo and mix my own colors.  Nobody in my immediate area stocks it, so I have to mail order everything, and being a newbie I ordered the brand that had the best color selection. 


Do you have any other craft or hobby stores in your area?  Or do you have any art supply stores in your area?  You might want to check those to see if you can find something other than Sculpey III.
Sculpey III is very soft as well as being brittle after baking when thin so it's doubly not suitable for making coverings on frames because they're necessarily thin. 
FimoSoft would be as soft, but somewhat stronger. 
Premo would be less soft, but very strong. 
FimoClassic and Kato Polyclay would be the least soft, and also very strong.

As for having the "best color selection," Sculpey III does have some nice colors, but many people prefer FimoClassic's colors, or the many "purer" colors offered by Premo or Kato (since the purest colors allow for the most possible mixes of new colors). 

Quote
Does Kato make a pearl, or am I going to have to mix mica in to make pearl shades?

Kato Polyclay actually makes their mica clays with the most mica in them of all the brands... for that reason, they can also sometimes be a bit stiff  (they carry a plain Pearl, as well as a Gold, Silver, and Copper in the line). 

Quote
I was wondering if there was any advantage to making things from white clay and painting them instead of sculpting from the colors? 


It all depends on what you want to accomplish.  You can certainly paint on top of white or other polymer clay, but then all the pattern and surface technique options possible with polymer clay will be severely limited.  Most clayers who really get into clay don't paint opaquely over all the clay (although they may use paints and inks and other colorants on top of, or inside, the clay in many ways), but it's totally up to you and what you want the final thing to look like.

Quote
. . I was mitering the corners on the frame, but if I'm putting little fish, mermaids, seaweed, etc. over it, is it really necessary to miter?  . . . Are the 4 diagonal lines necessary at the corners? 


Most clay-covered frames I've seen don't have mitered corners, so it's definitely not necessary.  Again it would be helpful to see which instructions you're following so I could see why mitering might even have been suggested. 
When "covering" a frame, generally the corners are covered completely with clay, then onlays, etc., are added... or they're covered with square canes butted side by side which are not mitered.

Quote
couldn't I just cut out a rectangle with another rectangle cutout in the center?
 

Sure... you could do that as a freestanding frame if it were thick enough, or put it on a backing like an acrylic sheet frame, or even to cover a cardstock matte frame, etc.

Quote
Now I'm wondering if I could just make a flat rectangle, decorate it, and glue it to the face of the frame....and that is totally NOT where I was going with that question! 


You can do that if it will fit the frame you're using whenever  you're "covering a frame" ...that was one of the suggestions in one of my previous posts, I think, but you'd said your frame wasn't flat so you couldn't do that (so I suggested you could do it if you cooled the curved clay covering, removed it and baked it separately, then glued it back onto the frame).


Quote
I also have found that your site is so much easier to navigate when I switch over to evil internet explorer from mozilla.


I'm very curious about this ... could you tell me what kinds of things happened when you used Mozilla, and what happened when you used IE instead??  That could possibly help me with designing or changing the site.


TIA,

Diane B.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2007 11:22:49 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
bigeyes
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2007 04:41:15 PM »


Just copy and paste a bit of the exact text from those directions at my site into your next message so that I can find the specific thing you're following.
from your site:
When covering unfinished or raw wood items, you must heat the wood for about 15 min. at 250-275 degrees (soft woods?) to dry them out completely. . . this will help prevent the moisture present in unfinished wood from expanding during the later baking and causing bubbling or cracking in the clay covering.

Did that.

From your site and another one I got the idea to then coat the frame with white glue and mod podge respectively, and I tried each one on a different frame.

The first frame did not shrink but it did burn.  It was the one that I goofed up the setting on the toaster oven.  The second one I did in the toaster oven but I covered the pan with foil.  It didn't burn, but it shrunk too much and after it cooled it cracked.  Same brand of clay.
Do you have any other craft or hobby stores in your area?  Or do you have any art supply stores in your area?  You might want to check those to see if you can find something other than Sculpey III.
Sculpey III is very soft as well as being brittle after baking when thin so it's doubly not suitable for making coverings on frames because they're necessarily thin. 
FimoSoft would be as soft, but somewhat stronger. 
Premo would be less soft, but very strong. 
FimoClassic and Kato Polyclay would be the least soft, and also very strong.

As for having the "best color selection," Sculpey III does have some nice colors, but many people prefer FimoClassic's colors, or the many "purer" colors offered by Premo or Kato (since the purest colors allow for the most possible mixes of new colors). 
I live in Hawaii.  I have to find 1) a store that will ship here. 2) a store that will ship US Mail as UPS is often more than the cost of the merchandise. 

There is one arts and crafts store on my side of the island, and it sucks.  Wal mart has a few things but they are not often restocked and their clay selection sucks.  On the other side of the island there is a wal mart with the same problems, a ben franklin and a stained glass store.  It is a 2 hour drive and we never get over there for any reason, so I have not gone there yet, and it's easier to just order it than to be disappointed after making a trip.
Mail order is my only option.  I'm thinking it's going to be kato polyclay either from polymer clay superstore or fire mountain gems.




Quote


I'm very curious about this ... could you tell me what kinds of things happened when you used Mozilla, and what happened when you used IE instead??  That could possibly help me with designing or changing the site.

 
On mozilla half the page was cut off on the left side and there was no way to move over.  My arrow wouldn't take me any further over.  I switched to explorer and could move over just fine.  I have no idea what causes that.  I could go all the way to the right, but not left.

I think I'm going to play with the glue on thing, maybe make the outer edge a little thicker and see if it will work.  I think the mitering thing was actually from another site and I mixed them up in my head.  I only looked at a gazillion sites while I was trying to figure out how to do this.  I have some cardboard frames I can play with also.

I tried to glaze a piece with future and it came out really shiny, but had all these little bubbles on it.  It's apparently been too long since I had an art class. Sad

Sigh.............................


So, now what can I do with all this clay until I can get the kato?

8(
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« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2007 01:46:36 PM »

Quote
from your site:
When covering unfinished or raw wood items, you must heat the wood for about 15 min. at 250-275 degrees (soft woods?) to dry them out completely
Quote
Did that.

So you are using a bare-wood frame??

Quote
From your site and another one I got the idea to then coat the frame with white glue and mod podge respectively, and I tried each one on a different frame.
The first frame did not shrink but it did burn (it was the one that I goofed up the setting on the toaster oven).
The second one I did in the toaster oven but I covered the pan with foil.  It didn't burn, but it shrunk too much, and after it cooled it cracked.  Same brand of clay.

Okay, so the only one that you baked at the correct temp was the one covered with ModPodge, right? 
We usually recommend plain white glue (permanent), but don't know if it would have made a difference from ModPodge.   ModPodge is basically a thinned-down white glue (perhaps the extra water in it would make a difference?), and it may also have some additives that make it not work as well... don't know though.  Could have been one of the other factors.

Are you letting the white glue dry awhile to get tacky before trying to add your raw clay?

Are you using Sculpey III?

Quote
and after it cooled it cracked. 


Hmmmm.... are you sure it didn't crack while heating?... only after it had cooled?  That's a bit more of a mystery, but again it could have something to do with the fact that you're using a brand of clay which when thin will tend to break or crack more easily just because it's more brittle than other brands. 
Can't really guess more without knowing more detail . . .for example, exactly where did the clay crack, what size were the cracks, and how many cracks were there?

Quote
I live in Hawaii.  I have to find 1) a store that will ship here. 2) a store that will ship US Mail as UPS is often more than the cost of the merchandise. 
There is one arts and crafts store on my side of the island, and it sucks.  Wal mart has a few things but they are not often restocked and their clay selection sucks. 
On the other side of the island there is a wal mart with the same problems, a ben franklin and a stained glass store.

So the arts and crafts store near you carries no polymer clay at all?  And you don't have any art supply stores or "hobby" stores near you (which also might carry polymer clay)?  I think Ben Franklin probably carries polymer clay, but don't know brands; I assume you'd want to call them for brands and colors in stock before going that far.

Quote
Mail order is my only option.  I'm thinking it's going to be kato polyclay either from polymer clay superstore or fire mountain gems.
 

Well, I don't see that the (yahoostore) Polymer Clay Superstore carries Kato Polyclay brand at all, though it does carry Premo, which is also a strong clay. 
And I didn't check the prices at FireMountainGems, but I bet they would be higher than if you ordered from either:

Donna Kato herself:

Prairie Craft: http://www.prairiecraft.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=KP
(800) 779-0615... Kato Polyclay + tools, materials
..."the most economic way to ship most items is via U.S. Postal Priority Mail for domestic orders... as low as $4.95; less than 20 lbs the rate is as low as $8.95 (good for US territories, Hawaii, PR and APO addresses). ...We do not wish to make money on shipping and handling. When shipping exceeds more than $2.00 over the postal rates we will credit your account that amount."
. . . "In the summer heat, Prairie Craft will now rotate its Kato Polyclay stock through our refrigerator and ship in an insulated carton at no additional cost... We do, however, recommend 3 day shipping." (still true?)
(ask what she and Vernon are doing about mailing in "summer heat" these days... this info could be dated)

Of if you ordered from Polymer Clay Your Way (California)
...http://www.polymerclayyourway.com   which may be even cheaper. 

It's always good to order polymer clay from a distributor who's also a polymer clayer, if you can,  because you'll always be assured of getting fresh clay, and you'll also generally have one person who's really willing to help you out (with shipping, info, etc.) much more than a huge company would or could.  Clayer-distributors will also know a lot more about polymer clay products than places like Fire Mountain Gems, etc.


You could also ask some of the other individual clayers in Hawaii, or some of the groups that seem to be interested in polymer clay in Hawaii, for ideas about where they get their clay and supplies.  Here's are some possible contacts (some of this info may be out of date though):

http://tinyurl.com/349y9x 
scroll down to "Hawaii" for individuals in Hawaii who are looking for clay contacts in Hawaii

Hawaii:
There is a group of clayers that meets at Fort Shafter I believe on Sundays and they get together and share their polymer clay ideas and techniques.  Sometimes Darlene Richardson teaches stuff she learns on the mainland.
....There is also a Bead Society which meets on the 4th Wednesday of every month at Linekona Art Academy at 7:00 p.m (Oahu?). Sarah from Honolulu
...Also, the Hawaii Stitchery and Fibre Arts Guild has brought in several polymer clay artists. Our guild meets at the HMA building on Beretania Street at 7:00 p.m. Meetings are usually help on the first Wednesday evening at 7:00at Linekona Art Academy (across Thomas Square) and are free and open to the public.
...Svetlana Vovina has taught at Bead It and the Honolulu Academy of Arts in Honolulu (polymer clay teacher--no supplies)
http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2001/Jun/04/il/il01a.html



Quote
I tried to glaze a piece with future and it came out really shiny, but had all these little bubbles on it.


You might want to read the tips about various ways of applying the thinner finishes like Future, as well as avoiding bubbles when using thicker finishes, etc., on this page of my site:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/finishes.htm
(... click on General Info & Uses, under Future
... and also on Applying--bubbles,brushes,brushmarks, under Varathane, for more tips)


Quote
So, now what can I do with all this clay until I can get the kato?

There are loads of ways to use the weaker clays.   
First of all, if you're making rounded items, or many small items without thin areas or projections, or anything which won't receive much stress, you can use it for all those --just nothing that will be thin or have projections which will be later stressed.
That should include a lot of beads, figures, objects, miniatures, etc., etc.  You can also make clay molds of all kinds (as long as they're reasonably thick), make canes with reasonably sharp delineations (but put the slices onto rounded or thick clay items, or onto other materials, which will give them more strength), draw on it with colored pencils/etc. or do transfers onto it (again preferably on a stronger clay underneath), use it as an armature, practice mixing colors together, try out various types of fauxs, make mosaics or mosaic tiles or other inlays or onlays, etc., etc.


HTH,

Diane B.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2007 02:00:01 PM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
bigeyes
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2007 10:01:24 PM »

Cool, I'll. try prairie craft!

Honolulu is on another island.  We on the big island are the poor stepchild. Sad    We have Kialua Kona, Hilo, and Captain Cook as the most well known cities.  Captain Cook is really just a blink of the eye, not much there. Kona has one lousy craft store that carries very little and at very high prices, and the wal mart that rarely re stocks what little they carry.  Hilo has a stained glass place, a wal mart that has the same stocking problem, and a ben franklin I have not been to yet because we just haven't found any reason to use up a half tank of gas on the off chance that they might have what I'm looking for.  I haven't been to hilo in months, we just haven't had a reason to go.
Everyone I know ships in their supplies.  My nail lady used to ship in all of her clay from fire mountain, I found out.

The second one baked at the proper temp was the white glue one, and it didn't crack until it cooled. 

I'm thinking kato is the way to go.  The good news is, I got 2 round cake decorating tips at a chef supply and I am bending one into an oval, so now I can cut out round and oval scales for my fish and mermaids.  Smiley

I just realized I haven't worked with clay in almost 30 years, so I should probably expect a few glitches.  I'm just having a bit of island fever this week.  A lot of frustrations with getting craft supplies, shipping, delays, and such.  Several places I've done business with for years just don't ship here at all.   I have been googling and making phone calls for weeks, and finding out that the clay I got is the 'wrong' kind just adds to the frustration.

I'm frustrated that I have so much premo to use up, I don't know what it will be good for.  I have a bunch of palm trees and banana trees, and various tropical fish that I guess I'll glue onto some painted frames later.  Maybe I can use this stuff up that way.

sigh..........

THIS ROCKS   Logged

if you can't lie no better than that......you might as well tell the truth.
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