A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Cookie Policy | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Curious if a project is for sale, or if someone wants to do a private swap with you?  Please Personal Message the member rather than posting on the thread.
Total Members: 314,693
Currently Running With Scissors:
196 Guests and 5 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1] 2 3  All
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Seaming looks... funny  (Read 3281 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit
1+
 
nemka
Offline Offline

Posts: 128
Joined: 06-Nov-2004

Tell Guu your problems. Guu will buy you a drink.


View Profile WWW
« on: March 17, 2007 08:03:06 AM »

Right now, the battery on my camera is charging, so I can't post a picture of this quite yet.

I do have a question, however: I'm seaming up a sweater, and it seam edge looks kind of funny, and I am wondering if I am doing something wrong.  The sleeve itself was worked from the wrist up, and required increases every 10th or so row.  I seamed it up using the mattress stitch, but at each increase, I have a weird slight gap at the seam.  It makes the finished product look rather sloppy, and so I'm wondering if there's anything I can do to alleviate that, and give it a more polished look.

Picture:

Thanks!
« Last Edit: March 17, 2007 09:10:06 AM by nemka » THIS ROCKS   Logged
AWynkoop
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2007 09:08:40 AM »

are you having a problem with your increases lining up? if so before you seam, line up the increases and pin them together that way they always match.

how many stitches between the increase and the edge of your knitting?  If there is only 1 you might try picking up in the center of the edge stitch (instead of between the edge stitch and the increase stitch) that way you have a little more fabric between the increase and the seam.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

I would like to swap my knits (or amigurumi stuffies) for your handmade journal...pm me!

The pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. The optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.~Winston Churchill
Lothruin
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 4628
Joined: 23-Jan-2004

I eat seakittens.


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2007 09:54:39 AM »

Yeah, it looks to me like the problem is that your increases are too close to the edge.  The increase puts a little give in the fabric, so if your increase is right on the seam edge, it can cause little holes like that.  I always make my increases two stitches in from the edge on seamed garments, so that there is a seam stitch and then a "real" stitch and THEN the increase.  Even when I'm using a pattern, I always alter it to put my increases 2 stitches in if the pattern is written otherwise.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Sometimes I post at Lothruin.com!

Find me on Ravelry as Lothruin! Actually, really, find me almost everywhere as Lothruin!
clicksticks
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2007 09:57:34 AM »

I also find that my seaming looks better if I make my increases 2 or more stitches in from the edge, so that I have a nice continuous line of stitches at the edge and don't have to seam through the increases.

And I've noticed that alot of these little imperfections seem to work themselves out with time and blocking...
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Studio Marlowe  Knitting patterns, etc.
nemka
Offline Offline

Posts: 128
Joined: 06-Nov-2004

Tell Guu your problems. Guu will buy you a drink.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2007 09:58:09 AM »

Yeah, it looks to me like the problem is that your increases are too close to the edge.  The increase puts a little give in the fabric, so if your increase is right on the seam edge, it can cause little holes like that.  I always make my increases two stitches in from the edge on seamed garments, so that there is a seam stitch and then a "real" stitch and THEN the increase.  Even when I'm using a pattern, I always alter it to put my increases 2 stitches in if the pattern is written otherwise.

That makes perfect sense.  Knit and learn!

Thanks!
THIS ROCKS   Logged
nemka
Offline Offline

Posts: 128
Joined: 06-Nov-2004

Tell Guu your problems. Guu will buy you a drink.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2007 09:59:58 AM »

are you having a problem with your increases lining up? if so before you seam, line up the increases and pin them together that way they always match.

how many stitches between the increase and the edge of your knitting?  If there is only 1 you might try picking up in the center of the edge stitch (instead of between the edge stitch and the increase stitch) that way you have a little more fabric between the increase and the seam.

Yeah, I think my increases were too close to the edge.  D'oh!
THIS ROCKS   Logged
nemka
Offline Offline

Posts: 128
Joined: 06-Nov-2004

Tell Guu your problems. Guu will buy you a drink.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2007 10:00:58 AM »

I also find that my seaming looks better if I make my increases 2 or more stitches in from the edge, so that I have a nice continuous line of stitches at the edge and don't have to seam through the increases.

And I've noticed that alot of these little imperfections seem to work themselves out with time and blocking...

What kind of increase do you suggest?

Also: it's good to hear that these little imperfections might eventually straighten themselves out.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
bijou_raoul
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2007 10:24:28 AM »

I normally use a m1 increase at least 2 stitches in from the edge so you have a little bit neater edge that's easier to work with. My first seams were pretty wonky too (though yours actually look like you've got a better handle on it than I did), and it's something that gets better with practice.

Another tip, if you start seaming from the wrist up, then if you end up with one side not quite matching up and you have to fudge it a little, the not-so-neat parts will be hidden in the armpit and not so noticeable (same with side seams, start from the hip and work up toward the armhole. I read that somewhere and now I do that for all my sweaters.

Hope that helps  Smiley
« Last Edit: March 17, 2007 10:26:35 AM by bijou_raoul » THIS ROCKS   Logged

fyberduck
the quacking fiber addict
Offline Offline

Posts: 1233
Joined: 21-Oct-2005

I reject your reality and substitute my own


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2007 07:41:04 PM »

I normally use a m1 increase at least 2 stitches in from the edge so you have a little bit neater edge that's easier to work with. My first seams were pretty wonky too (though yours actually look like you've got a better handle on it than I did), and it's something that gets better with practice.

Another tip, if you start seaming from the wrist up, then if you end up with one side not quite matching up and you have to fudge it a little, the not-so-neat parts will be hidden in the armpit and not so noticeable (same with side seams, start from the hip and work up toward the armhole. I read that somewhere and now I do that for all my sweaters.

Hope that helps  Smiley

Exactement.  My first, like, two sweaters had the increases too close to the sleeve seams (after the first one, I tried inc'ing one stitch in and... blech).  And I've had to help friends seam sleeves that were a bit wonky.  Always start at the wrists, just in case.  I also love to use the M1 (right or left) just because it blends in so well Cheesy 
THIS ROCKS   Logged

the qfa:
unequivocally proving that knitting is not an intelligence test

Got a tape measurer?
redwitch
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2007 12:21:38 AM »

It's easy for us to say the fix is to place your increases differently but yours is already knitted! I would research blocking online (there's a great knitty article about an old aran sweater that was fixed with blocking!). You might also want to see knitty articles on seaming, perhaps you could undo the seams, block to identical sizes along that seamed edge, then pin the sleeve edges thoroughly, matching up the increases and ends well. Your cuff edges look the tiniest bit offset? Lots of pins or even basting to line the sleeves up well, then seaming again with very careful tension.
I know lots of people hate seaming but it is really worth the time to get a finished product looking good! After x hours of knitting you don't want to rush the seaming to have it look sloppy... so if this bothers you, put in lots of time to show off the great fabric you have made. Your LYS may also be able to help you, some even have professional finishers that will assemble a garment for you!
Unless you want to unravel the sleeves and reknit them with different increases...
Sarah
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] 2 3  All Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



Latest Blog Articles
@Home This Weekend: Plastic Bottle Lanterns
October 17, 2018 Featured Projects
Tute Tuesday: Magic Wands



Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Privacy Policy | Cookie Policy | Terms | Site Map

Copyright ©2003-2017, Craftster.org, © 2009-2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands