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Purses, Bags, Wallets Tutorials

Browse free product instructions and tutorials from the Craftster community. For more crafting fun visit the Purses, Bags, Wallets Forum.

June 12, 2007 07:33:41 PM by chezlin
Views: 6170 | Comments: 20
I made this a while ago, for my little sister.  Sorry for the blurry pics...

Here is the front.


The back.


Look inside... oh.. there's something in here, what could it be?


The bag unfolds into a towel!  Here's everything unfolded out of the bag.  (Minus my cat, Ewok.. he decided to be a camera whore while I was taking pictures, he was never inside of the bag Wink)


It's basically made in the same fashion as a quillow.(quilt/pillow.. my grandma used to make those for me)  It's made so you can have it in bag form and shove all of the things that you need at the pool or beach, sunscreen, sunglasses, magazines, etc.  Then after you've had a good time in the pool, unfold the towel and dry off.  Once you're ready to leave, pack everything back inside of itself and go!

November 04, 2014 05:37:01 PM by Calabaza
Views: 9739 | Comments: 3
I’ve always wanted a bag based off a paper bag. I really like paper bags. They’re such a good size for so many things! I also really like popcorn. This Halloween I wanted to join the circus, so I got off my duff and made this:


(More on the whole outfit is here.)

It was fun to make once I stopped making things more complicated than they needed to be Tongue It’s a habit I’m trying to break.

I used:
A paper lunch bag
Fabric for the outside (and fabric paint to paint the stripes on the muslin. Masking tape and a sponge brush were also involved)
Lining fabric (Cut 2 pieces as long as the top edge of your bag + 1/2” seam allowance and as tall as 1/2 of the finished bag width + 2” seam allowance so it can close in the middle.)
Drawstring closure fabric (I used unpainted muslin)
Interfacing (I used some cheap, light-weight stuff to give it a lunch bag personality)
Cord
General sewing supplies like scissors, sewing machine, pins, etc.

After settling on a plan of action, I snagged a paper bag from the pantry and cut it open like this to use as my pattern:



Next time, I will square it up before cutting Roll Eyes

I just added 1/2” for the seam allowance by measuring that far away all around the bag except for the top (I wanted mine a smidgen shorter, so I didn’t add any on the straight parts there.) Draw where you want the seam allowance to be for the curved cut-outs at the top of the bag. Cut like this for the outside and lining.

Make and attach pockets if desired. (I just had one inside to hold my ID and such. Don’t forget to allow for the gusset and top seam when positioning.)

Take outer body piece and fold in half right-sides together so the edges of the small rectangles meet and the long edges are even. Sew. Repeat with other side. Repeat with lining, leaving an opening to turn bag through (or not. As long as the stitch length isn’t on teeny-tiny, the seam ripper is my friend. And it sure helps with pressing to sew it all closed)

Press open side seams. Trim to 1/4” if you want.

Take 1 body piece and open out a small rectangle so that the edges meet in 1 line, with the side-seam in the center of 1 side. Sew right-sides together with your seam allowance. Repeat with the other side and with the lining.




Iron in folds (like a paper bag!)

Sew closure pieces right sides together along short sides. Press open seams. Fold seam allowances under so the edges meet the seam like this…

…and iron.
Sew seam allowances down close to the edge, like hems.

Press.

Press top edge of closure under 1/4”. Press under another 3/4”. Sew close to the edge.

With seam ripper open the side seams sewn into the hem. Slipstitch the inside side and the bottom 1/4” or so of the outside closed so the opening is only on the outside and the 1/4” raw edge inside is covered. These will be the openings for the drawstrings.


Time to put it all together!


Slip closure piece on the outside piece, aligning edges and side seams, right side facing right side of outer. Slip lining piece on, right side facing wrong side of closure, aligning edges and side seams. Sew around top edge using your seam allowance. Turn through lining and press, poking the rounds (and everything else) into shape!




Top stitch around top edge 3/4” away from the top edge with the closure tucked down inside.

Slipstitch lining opening closed.

Insert string for 1 side of drawstring in and out through 1 side. Knot. Repeat, going in and out through other side.

Your fabric paper bag bag is complete! Yay!



September 13, 2014 07:14:39 AM by Melladh
Views: 10995 | Comments: 7
My boyfriend has been taking a sandwich to work for an afternoon snack each day, spending plastic bags like they're infinite... so I bought some cheap waterproof table cloth fabric and made these sandwich wraps, with that and some quilting fabric!



(too cheap btw... buy something better than i did, mine is overly sensitive to piercing, and splits a bit)

And a small tutorial - I know there have been others, but it's been a while since I did progress photos, so I wanted to play with that again Cheesy

I started with making a circle template, by measuring out a 30cm (12'') square of freezer paper, then folding it in half, and half again, and then corner-to-corner, always preserving the center of the original square as a point. Then cutting it off. And tracing the template onto one piece of quilting fabric and one piece of waterproof fabric.



Since the waterproof fabric will remain pierced if you pierce it, you shouldn't pin them together. If you use a large seam allowance and you're fine with some sloppy edges (my quilting fabric folded over on every one of these) you can just tape them together a couple of times, right sides together. For better stability, using hair pins supposedly works well.



Sew around, leaving a large hand's width to turn



Turn right side out, and squeeze out the edges. Fold your opening together, and stitch all around the circle, to both sew the opening shut and prevent the thicker fabric to push out the light quilting fabric.



As shown above, take a squareish piece of velcro (the spiky side) and sew to the waterproof side of your wrap, at one edge. You start to see the result as you fold in the sides, one third each. Then you can fold up the bottom one third, and measure out the soft velcro to match your spiky one - this will attach on the quilting fabric side, but be longer so you can accomodate for different size sandwiches.



Once you've got your last piece of velcro attached, you've got a sandwich wrap ready to use!



Now remember to wash off your waterproof fabric with some soap to get rid of that outer layer of stray chemicals, so you don't get it in your sandwich! Cheesy I did that after sewing, and they're now hanging to dry. Mine isn't machine washable, but I'm pretty sure you can get some better fabric than I did which will hold up for throwing them in the wash when you need to!

Craft Tutorials in Purses, Bags, Wallets



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