A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Cookie Policy | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Jingle bells, jingle bells, it's time to show off your TREE!  Show off your flocking and garland with us this year.
Total Members: 319,835
Currently Running With Scissors:
271 Guests and 6 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop
  Show Images
Pages: 1 2 [3]
21  Tube-style baby sling *TUTORIAL* Like New Native or Maya Pouch in Purses, Bags, Wallets: Completed Projects: General by sedrasmom on: June 18, 2005 01:38:44 AM
Here's some pics of a tube style sling in the making. Look familiar, afianto?  Wink  This is my first try at using photobucket, so I really hope this works. I had problems posting photos from my Kodak gallery, some people said they could not see the pictures. Others said they could see them but only after they right-clicked and chose "show photo". Please let me know if these pictures don't load for you. I really hope this works OK. I hope it is not a crazy Mac thing or something. Undecided



Basically, this style sling is just a long piece of fabric with the long edges hemmed (the sides of the sling), and you fold it over and cut a curve along the open end that you then sew together (see the "frenching" technique for reinforcing this seam below). I prefer using medium-heavy weight cotton or cotton blend fabrics. Flannel works great, I've made many of these out of old top sheets. Regular sheets would work too.

I lost the notes I was jotting down when I made this, but I'm pretty sure I started with a strip of fabric that was 29 inches when folded over, and curved it in 2 inches, so the center of the curve is 29" and the shorter outside edges are 27". This is tall or very petite, then add or subtract 2 inches from this and it should work. It should be pretty snug on you when you wear it, because the baby's weight will make it sag a little, and you don't want it swing so low it's in front of your knees. It should be just above waist level.

Hem the long side edges first, then fold the piece in half like in the first picture and cut a curve across it. Sew the curve with a "frenched" seam to make it extra secure...to "french" the seam,  first you sew across the curve with the RIGHT sides facing OUT (not in, like you would normally think you'd do). Use about a .25 seam allowance. The reason you do this is so you can then turn it inside out and sew it with the right sides together encasing the edges of the first seam you sewed, this time sewing with maybe a .5 seam allowance, so the edges are completely inside this second seam. This produces a little flappy piece, that you then squash down to either side and sew down flat. This is what I mean by a flap:


To use it, you fold it skinny-wise, so both open side edges are together facing up when you wear it sash-style. The seam goes in front of you, it is a little wider there because of the curve, so that's where the baby goes.



By the way, basically wherever the butt goes, the baby follows. So aim the butt for the seam of the sling, and the baby will be cradled perfectly. The same thing goes for if you're wearing an older baby/toddler, you put the butt in and let the legs hang down. They say the first few times you try putting the baby in, you should stand over the bed just in case, not that you'll really drop your baby, but just to give you peace of mind. The first time you put them in, it's good to take a little walk right away. Walking helps them get used to it, and you'll feel more confident too. If you're right handed, wear the sling on your right shoulder so your left hand will be available to lightly hold the baby, and your right hand will be the one that's freer to do  other things. Vice-versa for lefties, of course.

If you use an infant carseat/carrier these slings make a great cozy to put over the baby when you're walking to/from the car, because you can wrap it around a baby and leave a little breathing hole. I live in WI where we'd use those fleecy carseat cozies with the flap--if you live where there's cold winters, you'll know what I'm talking about. But...an even better option is to wear the baby in the sling under a coat that is big enough for you both! Just leave the carseat in the car and put the baby in the sling! I figured this out fast because Sedra was born in September (a Labor Day labor) just before it started getting cold, and I had a nasty labor/c-section and didn't have the strength to carry the baby and the bucket both. One time I tried, and slipped on the ice and fell and could barely get up. That's the last time our carseat went anywhere with us. It was really a lot easier having her on my person. I was able to wear her in a sling until she was about 3 years old/around 35 lbs. Of course by then it was just for if we were out somewhere all day and her legs got tired or she needed to nap, to help save me from sack-of-potatoes syndrome.

Please let me know if you have any questions/comments/suggestions. I'm very glad to be able to share what I know about babywearing, breastfeeding, or other crunchy parenting notions!

Enjoy your baby!

Monica
Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
22  Re: Maki Sushi TP Cozy (knit version tutorial) in Knitting: Completed Projects by sedrasmom on: June 05, 2005 07:57:30 PM
Here's the crocheted version I made for my mom for Mother's Day, very fitting since we are Japanese! I did not use the pattern, I just winged it, then added makeshift yarn embroidery. Thanks so much for sharing this idea!

Monica

Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
23  Re: My Strawberry-Licious Strawberry Skirt - Yum!! (w/ Tutorial!!) in Clothing: Completed Projects: General by sedrasmom on: June 05, 2005 07:39:10 PM
Here's Sedra in an easy elastic waist version. I also made her a purse to match but she dropped it down too far that you can't see it, oh well. Thanks for sharing such a clever idea!

Monica

Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
24  Let me make your craft 3 gallery in The Swap Gallery by sedrasmom on: June 05, 2005 06:21:26 PM
Here's the enormous lot of neat stuff LiquidScissors sent to me! There were trinkets en masse - beads, jewelry stuff, hair stuff, lite brite pegs, bottle caps, kids' sunglasses, also some neat old record albums, lots of pretty paper, some yarn, felt, and much, much more!

And here's Sedra with all the really fun stuff!
Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
25  Re: Make A Statement Swap Gallery in The Swap Gallery by sedrasmom on: June 05, 2005 01:22:19 AM


Elizasmom sent me a fantastic big roomy tote bag!  The bag has a quote ironed on to a lighter fabric panel, pinned onto the bag. The quote on the bag said, "Women do not have to sacrifice personhood if they are mothers. They do not have to sacrifice motherhood in order to be persons.  Liberation was meant to expand women's opportunities, not to limit them.  The self-esteem that has been found in new pursuits can also be found in mothering. Elaine Heffner." Well, that got me balling, it was so absolutely in line with who I am, it was as if someone had snuck into my soul while I wasn't looking and brought my beliefs out front and center. Well, I opened the bag, and found a huge stack of more than a dozen more interchangeable statement squares - quotes on parenting, feminism, and motherhood, all that suit me perfectly. While I read them all, I had tears rolling down my face because she was so dead-on in manifesting my sentiment, I was a complete blubbering fool! Tears aside, I could not be happier. Thanks, Leila, for the thought and effort that went into crafting such a wonderful gift. It is so comfy and the perfect size to hold those bulky oversized artsy things that I carry in addition to my overstuffed purse. Thank you so much!!!

Monica
Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
26  Re: Voulez Vous Crochet Avec Moi? Call for submissions for next SnB book in Projects from the Stitch 'N B**ch Books by Debbie Stoller by sedrasmom on: June 02, 2005 06:34:52 PM
I found a better example, in the door of my fridge of all places....

Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
27  Re: Voulez Vous Crochet Avec Moi? Call for submissions for next SnB book in Projects from the Stitch 'N B**ch Books by Debbie Stoller by sedrasmom on: June 01, 2005 11:06:58 AM
Shit, I came across this thread way late or I would've submitted my dish fish.

Monica
i want to see your dish fish!

     

This guy's pretty well-worn but he's the only one who was clean in the kitchen towel drawer. I just work in rounds increasing then decreasing, then squash it flat and add the fins/eye/tail, so it's a two-ply acrylic yarn scrubbie. These are great for washing dishes, and I also make bigger ones for in the bath.

Monica
Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
28  One Piece DIY Cloth Menstrual Pads *Tutorial* in Bath and Beauty: Completed Projects by sedrasmom on: May 03, 2005 12:07:02 PM
One piece cloth pads are super easy to make and use. They're basically a towel sewn between two outer layers of flannel, with wrap-around flaps for attaching them to underwear. To wear them, you fold the pad in thirds and snap them on. Because they unfold flat, they don't take too long to dry. These work great alone, or as a backup to a menstrual cup or sponge (both excellent tampon alternatives) or for those "maybe I'll start my period today" days  because unlike disposable pads, they can be worn all day (they're just fabric, after all). They are soft and comfy, and, needless to say, because they are reusable they are both economically and ecologically sound!



To make a one piece pad, start by cutting two 9x9 inch squares of flannel and one of terrycloth (I use old towels). Sew them together very close to the edge (I use the edge of my presser foot as a guide) with the right sides of the flannel facing each other, and the towel on top. Leave a little opening for turning the whole thing right-side out. Turn it so the flannel is on the outside, then stitch the opening closed. I sew all the way around just so it looks consistent, but you could just sew the opening if you wanted to.

*VARIATIONS* If you want to make longer pads, use a 9 inch width but increase the length to 12 or 13 inches or whatever suits you. If you want to make lighter-duty pads, you could just cut a 3 inch strip of terrycloth and sew it onto the middle of one of the flannel pieces rather than using a towel as big as the whole pad. You could also use other fabric to for the flaps if you don't want to use your decorative flannel. I sometimes use denim from old blue jeans.



Cut two sets of little  flaps, about 2 1/2 by 3 inches with rounded corners. Sew them and turn them right-side out.



Facing inward towards the center of the pad, overlap the pad flaps a little, and pin them smack dab to the center of the top of the pad. If you pin them to the center of the pad, there's no way you could sew them on incorrectly. Fold the pad in thirds, turn the raw edges of the pad flaps under,and pin them in place right where the pad is folded. Unfold the pad and sew the flaps down securely (I sew 2-3 rows for reinforcement).



Attach snaps to the flaps (or velcro, or another fastener of your choice).



That's all there is to it! Now you can sit back and marvel at your creative feat of menstrual self-sufficiency!

Happy Crafting!!!
 Cheesy
[/color]
Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
29  Re: Making Crochet Hooks from Chopsticks in Crochet: Completed Projects by sedrasmom on: April 27, 2005 12:57:29 AM
I drew a rough sketch of the cuts to make, but the instructions came out too small to read when I saved it small enough for uploading to craftster's picture hosting.


This is what I'm getting at - from left to right -

1 - Cut the stick to desired length
2 - Cut a little off the full length of the handle and cut the neck swoop. Extend the neck swoop cut a little past where you want the point of the hook to be. (Actually you could probably get by without trimming the whole handle if you wanted. It wouldn't make that much difference.)
3 - Cut an upward notch - forming the hook part - to meet the cut you made in step 2 for the neck swoop.
4 - cut a little off the top to make it pointy. optionally, trim a handle swoop for a comfy grip area.
5 - (This is supposed to represent the front view....) Trim the other corners of the top to make them pointy, like in the last step. Trim a little off the sides by the neck so that part is skinnier than the handle.

After that, file all the points down to shape it the way you want, then sand it down smooth. Follow with the waxing method of your choice.

Happy hooking!
Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
30  Making Homemade Crochet Hooks from Chopsticks in Crochet: Completed Projects by sedrasmom on: April 24, 2005 12:19:07 AM
I loved the one wooden crochet hook I had, but I misplaced it somehow. When I couldn't find it, I decided to try making one for myself. Turns out it's super easy! I made the rough cuts using a scroll saw (you could just use a knife or hacksaw for this if you don't have a scroll saw) then I did a lot of shaping using a large file, followed by coarse then fine sandpaper. To help the yarn glide, I waxed the hooks by rubbing them against a candle. I have no idea exactly what size any of these are, but I don't use patterns, so for me, gauge is unimportant. I made the biggest hook in this picture from a wider scrap of dowel because my daughter asked me to make one for her. She fancied it up with markers, and did the candle rubbing by herself, then we glued a big bead onto the end of it. I think it only took me about 10-15 minutes to make one, except the first one which took longer because I had to think more. I tried them out and they work fine, so I'm thrilled with how these turned out. And, besides, I had way too many chopsticks. Cheesy



Edited to insert tutorial:
I drew a rough sketch of the cuts to make, but the instructions came out too small to read when I saved it small enough for uploading to craftster's picture hosting.


This is what I'm getting at - from left to right -

1 - Cut the stick to desired length
2 - Cut a little off the full length of the handle and cut the neck swoop. Extend the neck swoop cut a little past where you want the point of the hook to be. (Actually you could probably get by without trimming the whole handle if you wanted. It wouldn't make that much difference.)
3 - Cut an upward notch - forming the hook part - to meet the cut you made in step 2 for the neck swoop.
4 - cut a little off the top to make it pointy. optionally, trim a handle swoop for a comfy grip area.
5 - (This is supposed to represent the front view....) Trim the other corners of the top to make them pointy, like in the last step. Trim a little off the sides by the neck so that part is skinnier than the handle.

After that, file all the points down to shape it the way you want, then sand it down smooth. Follow with the waxing method of your choice.

Happy hooking!
Report to moderator  THIS ROCKS  
Pages: 1 2 [3]


FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



Latest Blog Articles
Handmade Holiday Gift Guide 2017: Mini Heart Pinata
Oh, deer!
@Home This Weekend: Stylish Jacket For Your Pooch



Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2017, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.