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HOME SWEET HOME => Exterior Decorating / Yard Art / Gardening: Discussion and Questions => Topic started by: Fried Gold on August 22, 2017 10:17:13 AM



Title: HELP! Freaking mint, Moving bulbs, Preparing garden for fall
Post by: Fried Gold on August 22, 2017 10:17:13 AM
I know it's a little early, but I figured I'm better off knowing what I'm in for.

I need help. We moved into a new house last October. The side garden has some beautiful irises and gladiolus, as well as a cute rose bush. However, the former owners planted mint in the same little plot. I'd like to keep the bulb flowers and the bush and get rid of the plague that is the mint, but I'm not really sure how to go about it. If I was going to rip up the bulbs, would I do it now? Wait till later? Do I have to plant them in the fall? I assume they're hardy as they survived the winter.

Otherwise, I have no problem digging up and suffocating that freaking mint.  >:(

Thanks in advance!


Title: Re: HELP! Freaking mint, Moving bulbs, Preparing garden for fall
Post by: Onyxnox on August 23, 2017 04:34:40 PM
Warning - that mint will come back and come back and come back if you leave even just a miniscule microspec of it behind.  I had a mint plant that busted through the the pot that held the pot it came in and I thought I got rid of it after three years of pulling, digging, etc - but this year, two years after I thought I finally got rid of it, it is growing through my patio.

Otherwise, dig up and move the bulbs after everything has died down - gladiolus, in my zone in Southern Canada (6a), are not winter hardy, so I would have to dig them up before the frost and store them - the occasional forgotten bulb survives a winter, but generally not winter hardy here.  The irises are hardy - I have taken some that people have been wanting to throw out and planted them throughout the summer and they come back.  It's actually good to dig the rhizomes up and trim the rot, and split them up regularly - just make sure to not plant them too deep, and not make too small a chunk as then it may not bloom for a couple of seasons