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JEWELRY AND TRINKETS => Trinkets and Jewelry: Discussion and Questions => Topic started by: sparrow on July 28, 2004 10:56:51 AM



Title: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: sparrow on July 28, 2004 10:56:51 AM
I'd like to find out more about PMC (Precious Metal Clay)...Has anybody tried it? It seems a little intimidating. I'm considering buying a starter kit, but they're a wee bit pricey and some come with torches, some come with mini hot pot kilny things, and they say you can also use your gas stovetop (is that safe?) Which is the best method? Am I going to blow up my house? Am I going to burst into flames?
I'd like to take a class, but there aren't any in my area of NJ. Hmmmm.....So any advice would be helpful, so I don't feel so daunted.  ???


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: halfjapanezegrl on August 06, 2004 11:57:52 PM
Although I have not yet taken the class, we offer a PMC course where I work (on the opposite coast from NJ, sorry!).  The produced pieces are awesome!  We order our clay and supplies through Rio Grande www.riogrande.com  Even though it costs more, we recommend buying the PMC+ or PMC3 because the shrinking rate after firing is so much lower than the orignal.  For more info check out http://www.riogrande.com/PMC/pmc.htm
We don't have a specific kiln for PMC, but instead use a small glass bead annealing kiln.  Maybe there's a local glass artist or ceramist who has a kiln you could borrow from time to time? 
Seems like it could become an expensive but rewarding hobby; good luck!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: sparrow on August 09, 2004 10:21:41 AM
Thanks! I'll have to check Rio Grande.
I agree with the expensive part....however, apparently there are alternate firing methods (butane torch and gas stovetop) which might make it more reasonable. It just seems like a great simple way to make silver jewelry, as opposed to traditional methods, which seem to require a lot of skill and tools. 
www.PMCSupply.com has a starter kit...I might have to convince my fiance to get it for my upcoming birthday.

 


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Rebel on August 10, 2004 07:45:48 AM

 I've made a few things with the PMC. The key is to keep the clay moist while you are working with it. I use olive oil on my hands so that it doesn't stick to your skin and end up wasting it!

 I fire my pieces at a local store where they make fused glass and lampworked beads. Sometimes a pottery place or a craft guild will fire pieces for you too. If you use stones in your work then you have to have it fired in a kiln because the stones crack with the other methods. The stones need the kiln to cool them down slowly.

There are tons of websites that will get you going.

I never did buy a kit, I found it cheaper to buy things separately and some things you can get at the hardware store.

Good luck with it.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: VoodooToaster on August 11, 2004 11:35:42 AM
I've always wanted to work with this stuff too - is it real wet though, like paper clay?  I never could work really well with that stuff, I'm more used to polymer clay.

What's the texture/consistency like?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: maize on August 16, 2004 10:25:59 AM
I'm a fulltime PMC artist and certified instructor.  Please check out www.pmcguild.com for more info on PMC and classes in your area.

Compared to silversmithing, PMC is the cheapest way to make your own silver pieces.  And, yes, you can fire it with a butane torch--the PMC 3 and PMC+, not the regular PMC (which I use).  PMC 3 & PMC+ can be rather sticky on the hands. Work quickly because it does dry fast.  It has less binder in it than regular PMC and fires in 10 minutes.

Good luck! 


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: VoodooToaster on August 16, 2004 11:23:40 AM
So it IS wet and squishy, like paper clay?  That's disappointing.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: gombey on October 10, 2004 12:27:28 PM
I (like Sparrow) would like to know more about using PMC.  I have been designing jewelry with semi-precious stones for about 8 months now and would like to incorporate doing silver jewelry as well.  Does anyone have any advice to get started?  I can't afford a Kiln but I can work with a blow torch!!!   ;D
What sort of PMC should I use? :-[

Thanks


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: maize on October 10, 2004 06:14:53 PM
Use PMC3 or PMC+ which can be fired with a butane torch.  Make sure you have some sort of fire brick or tile below the piece you are firing so you don't start your worksurface on fire. 

The standard PMC feels most like regular clay.  PMC3 and PMC+ are rather sticky.  I would use PMC+ if firing with a torch.  There are several books out regarding PMC which you can check out from your library or peruse at the bookstore.  As I've said before, go to www.pmcguild.com for info about PMC.  Rio Grande also has some information in their catalog about PMC.

You can always email me at [email protected] with any questions.  I'll try and answer all your questions the best I can. 



Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: madebykris on October 13, 2004 08:03:25 PM
I've fired it with a torch and on the stove, the torch worked better.  I wish I were better with clay so my pieces were cooler, sigh.  Get a proper fire brick to use the torch with (available at home improvment stores).  I thought I could improvise with a heavy clay tiie, and I was wrong.  As I was firing it exploded, splitting down the center, and each half shooting out horizontally and falling to the ground on either side of the table.  I laughed hysterically for about an hour  :D  My mom was in the room, talking on the phone to my dad, who heard the explosion.  He asked what it was, my mom said "Oh, it's just Kris blowing things up with a torch," and he said "okay," and they changed topics.  How much does that say about me?   ;)  The upside is, you can also use your torch to carmalize the top of creme brulee.  That works really well, too.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: maize on October 14, 2004 06:04:34 PM
When firing a piece with a torch, it's a good idea to set the piece on a wire shelf.  So...what is a wire shelf?  Home Depot or other hardware stores carry a type of wire fencing in rolls, sort of like chicken wire but the holes are square.  It's very sturdy.  Cut a piece and bend it on both sides/like a table so to speak.  Put your piece on top of the wire shelf when your firing so you can avoid blowing up your tile.

Fire safe tiles can be found at pottery supply stores also for less than a dollar.  I use these as shelves in my kiln.  Seattle Pottery carries them and they also have a mail order business in case you'd like to order from them. 



Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: wispily on December 19, 2004 07:12:54 PM
I guess this might be a dumb question, but can anyone give me a rough estimate of what you can make with how much PMC?--e.g. how many grams does a ring take, etc.  Does it shrink after firing?  On firemountaingems.com they sell it in 10, 20, and 50 gram packs, which seems like not that much for how much it costs (okay, so it's not that expensive, but I am a huge cheapskate).

I can figure out using my 100g microbeads pack ( :P ) how much 50g is, sort of, but I don't want to miscalculate!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: maize on December 20, 2004 09:09:20 AM
The shrinkage rate depends on what type of PMC you're using.  Standard PMC shrinks about 30-40%.  PMC+ and PMC3 shrink about 10%.  I use the PMC 3 for teaching my class because the shrinkage rate is small and can be fired in 10 minutes.  My designs use standard PMC because I like the texture and can get quite a bit more pieces out of one lump of clay.

When my students use PMC3 and PMC+ (which I haven't decided what the difference is yet) of the 28 gram package, they can make about 5-6 pieces.  Of course, this depends on the thickness and size.  You should easily be able to make 2-3 rings from a package--again depending on the thickness and size of the ring.  Once fired you can also pound or drill the silver because it is now in a metal state.  So, a ring for example, could be put on a mandrel and pounded into shape and you can gain a bit in size by doing this also.

Hope that helps!

Cheers!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: wispily on December 21, 2004 10:27:46 PM
Thank you very much!  I am glad you helped out because I thought I could get a lot less stuff out of one package.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Valoir on December 22, 2004 09:37:10 AM
I also am certified in PMC and Art Clay Silver products and I design and teach lots of classes. 
We usually use the 20 gram packages of PMC+
I think it is better to start with PMC+ because it stays moist a little longer and it is easier to reconstitute with water (if the clay starts to dry out, add a drop of water and work it in) but the PMC3 tends to get a wet paper consistency if you add water, never getting back to a smooth clay.

Anyway, if you go to this page (a page from my former website) http://www2.bitstream.net/~cumelat/student%20gallery.html, you will see some photos called workshop results and those were all done with either a 20 gram or 28 gram package of clay - usually my students are able to make 2 pairs of earrings and 2 pendants in the workshop from the 20 gram package.

Have fun.  Always remember safety first.  Especially if you have no training in a jewelry studio.  You should have a fire extinguisher near by if you are using a torch.  Tie back long hair and wear safety glasses.  This is no joke.

Valerie/Valoir


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: madebykris on December 22, 2004 06:50:10 PM
Put your piece on top of the wire shelf when your firing so you can avoid blowing up your tile.

Yeah, I knew better, but I was excited to try it and was improvising.  I didn't think it through very well.  Don't do that.  Or if you do, I think there's at least one thread about crafty injuries...


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Lothruin on December 22, 2004 08:41:15 PM
How does one get certified in things like this?  I did professional goldsmithing for 3 years and can't say I'm a certified anything.  :(

*Never mind, I just read the PMC Certification thing on the Rio website.  Interesting.

I've never used PMC, but I've been dreaming about it for as long as I've gotten the Rio Grande catalog.  In fact, I remember when Rio Grande first started carrying PMC, so I've been dreaming about it for a VERY long time.  My biggest reason against trying it was the lack of a kiln.  I think I knew you could fire it with a torch, which I have, but I really wanted an excuse to buy a kiln so I could also do lost-wax castings.  Hah!  See how far THAT got me.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay & Art Clay Silver
Post by: craftsurge on January 06, 2005 06:42:02 AM
Hi-
I have been playing with the Art Clay Silver formula and have made a few rings and pendants. I am loving, LOVING this stuff! Anyone who has had a dream of creating their own piece of jewelry should try this out.
I want to get certified and I am having a big problem - I can't find an Art Clay class in my area. (and I live in Los Angeles!!)
Can a PMC certification count as an Art Clay Certification? Are they the same thing? The products are different so I am not sure. Also, if anyone in the LA area knows of a store I can buy some supplies at that would be amazing, ordering online is kind of a buzzkill when you have Veruca Salt syndrome. (I want it now, Daddy!!)
Also, any tips on poilishing would be greatly appreciated. I know I need better tools to start, but I have been using the steel brush and my dremmel with a felt bit and some fabulustre compound. This seems to get the pieces nice and shiny but doesn't really smooth it out much. I tried using a burnisher and I think I used it wrong because I ended up scratching my piece even more.
anyway, I am happy to see this thread!

oh, and for beginners- if you don't want to take a class first (like me) try creating your piece first in polymer clay- it will save you in the long run, just remember to wipe all our tools off with alcohol before embarking on the real stuff so you don't taint your clay with polymer residue.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: beadgirl on January 06, 2005 08:39:11 AM
I want to try this so bad!  I FINALLY got my sewing machine after 4 years of whinning and crying so maybe if I start on my husband now for a kiln I'll have one in a few years!  :D 


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on January 06, 2005 09:47:52 AM
the cool thing about this stuff is you don't need a kiln for a lot of projects. You can use a gas torch or even a gas stovetop!
I hope you get a kiln, that is a dream of mine too!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: maize on January 06, 2005 01:24:33 PM
Art Clay and PMC are two different companies.  Each offer certification for their product.  You can check the PMC Guild's website at www.pmcguild.com.  All classes are listed there.  If you don't see a certification class listed, email them and they'll let you know when the next one is.  There should be several PMC certification classes in the LA area.  The artist who certified me is from Santa Barbara.

Tips on polishing:  Buy a tumbler and some stainless steel shot.  Shot is the stuff they put in shotgun shell bullets.  Lortone is a good tumbler (about $30) and most silversmith supply shops such as Alpha Supply 1-800-257-4211 carry them and the stainless steel shot.  The shot is rather expensive, about $25 a pound, but you can use it over and over and it doesn't rust.  Don't buy the cheap shot because it will rust and can leave rust spots on your pieces.  Simply put the shot in the tumbler, fill it to about an inch from the top with water and use some liquid soap--don't use Dial antibacterial because it peels the rubber off of the tumber and can leave a weird sheen to your pieces.  I know this from trial and error!!

You can tumble your pieces without having to use the wire brush after they are fired.  Let them tumble for an hour or so.  If they aren't shiny enough for you, tumble until they are.  I've found about an hour or so works best.  You'll also want to have a colander (with small holes or use a screen) nearby when you dump the tumbler out.  You don't want to lose all your shot or your pieces down the drain.

Hope that helps!

Cheers!

 


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on January 06, 2005 02:15:34 PM
Thanks for the info maize... I saw the tumbler and thought how cool, I guess I will have to make the investment. I saw the shot for sale at the supply store for $6 a pound, its probably the cheap stuff....
So, if I want to get certified in Art Clay it is a totally speerate certification from PMC, correct?
What are your thoughts on PMC vs. Art Clay?
You are great! Thanks and  hopefully I will post some pics of my humble beginings soon!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: maize on January 06, 2005 04:39:32 PM
PMC and Art Clay are exactly the same product only sold under different names.  There really isn't much of a difference in certification from what I can tell.  I suppose Art Clay may have different projects that you have to complete than the PMC projects, but I'm sure they're all the same techniques.

Yes, the shot you mention is the cheap stuff and I guarantee you it will rust.  The stainless steel shot is worth the investment because you'll have it forever.

Good luck!



Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Valoir on January 11, 2005 12:14:21 PM
The company you decide to certify with does make a big difference.  There are three silver clay certification programs.  PMC Connection, Rio Rewards and Art Clay Silver.  I suggest you do some asking around and aim for what suits you and your goals best.  First, the certification is nearly $400, so that is a big investment.  Second, you will earn a discount, but only with that company. Third, the programs focus on different skills and techniques, PMC Connection is less rigid with the projects, whereas in Rio Rewards and Art Clay, you replicate the sample projects.

I got certified first with PMC Connection. 
Then I did a cross-over class with Art Clay Silver (it was one day, as opposed to three, since I was already certified with another company).

After doing all that, for personal reasons, I still want to be certified under the Rio Rewards program, and hope to do that in the year 2005. 

I know there is a lot going on in the LA area for silver clay - look for Carl Stanley and he can probably direct you to others. 

Feel free to IM me with more questions.
Valerie/Valoir

P.S. Although the products are only slightly different, Art Clay Silver does offer some products that you cannot get in the PMC form. 


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on February 10, 2005 06:45:51 AM
I thought I would post my newbie pics.... you can see I still need a tumbler.  This is a stamped pendant that I oxidised and a ring with a manufactured ruby.




I found someone to certify me in Art Clay. I am going to do a private session and get all my projects done in one day. I think that is probably best since I am already working with the clay and have a good feel for the basics. I really like working with this stuff.

 


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: catherine625 on February 10, 2005 07:27:44 AM
I was watching crafters coast to coast yesterday and one of the guys was using PMC like a slip and brushing it onto the design of the pot he was making. It was really neato.  then he fired it like normal on the pot during the glaze firing.   I would assume that he was using the PMC, not pmc+ or 3...?  If you have a kiln, how high do you fire it, because it looked like he was using white earthenware, and that fires to about 1800.  It seems like it would leave a lot nicer texture than say a luster (a precious metal chloride, ie silver chloride).

http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/cr_clay_pottery/article/0,1789,HGTV_3240_3351233,00.html


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: krazigal72 on February 10, 2005 07:58:39 AM
craftsurge...that is an awesome ring!! the pendant is really cool too, but i love the ring


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Rylizbeth on February 16, 2005 01:26:59 PM
craftsurge,

Did you use a kiln or a torch?

I love the ring!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on February 16, 2005 09:18:51 PM
I used a torch, I wish I had a kiln. But the torch works great for the smaller projects I have done.
Thanks for the kinds words, the ring was pretty easy, but I recommend practicing in Sculpey first.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Rylizbeth on February 17, 2005 07:24:45 AM
I used a torch, I wish I had a kiln. But the torch works great for the smaller projects I have done.
Thanks for the kinds words, the ring was pretty easy, but I recommend practicing in Sculpey first.


That's encouraging. I'm not lucky enough to have a kiln either. I assume you used PMC3? Manufactured ruby = man made?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on February 17, 2005 05:07:01 PM
I used the Art Clay version of PMC3 It is Art Clay 650. It has a lower firing temperature like the PMC3.
Yes the ruby was man made. They were like $.20 each- so I bought a bunch. I am going to take a ring class ina week or so, I will let you know how it turns out.



Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: krazigal72 on February 17, 2005 05:09:19 PM
craftsurge...where did you get the clay?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on February 17, 2005 05:20:00 PM
I got my starter kit from dickblick.com. I know they sell almost all the varieties.  You can also purchase Art Clay from ArtClayWorld.com.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: krazigal72 on February 17, 2005 05:20:51 PM
thanks :)


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on February 21, 2005 05:50:12 PM
This is my latest creation.... Any opinions on whether I should oxidize it??



Made with Art Clay Silver.

thanks!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: krazigal72 on February 22, 2005 03:42:26 PM
i like it as is


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: mols on February 25, 2005 06:59:35 AM
I gave up on the idea of PMC when I decided I couldn't afford to buy any more equipment.  The idea that it can be torch fired makes me all giddy and ready to jump for joy a little.
Could someone either give me a basic description of how you torch fired your pieces or point me in the direction of a web site that will tell me?

*skip* *hop*  ::)


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: maize on February 25, 2005 08:31:28 AM
Go to www.firemountaingems.com.  They have a new catalog out in which they are selling Art Clay and all the tools you need to work with it, including butane torches, fire brick to fire the piece on etc.  Although I've never worked with Art Clay (I'm a diehard PMC certified teacher and artist) I hear it's similar to PMC.  You can also go to the PMC Guild website located at www.pmcguild.com and can access other artists, teachers and information about using PMC.


Title: Has anyone tried Precious Metal Clay?
Post by: Dallas Alice on March 09, 2005 12:10:35 PM
This stuff looks SO cool-- it's silver metal powder mixed with a pliable clay. Form it, fire it in a kiln, and the clay dissolves, leaving you with a piece that's 99.9% silver! FireMountainGems.com seems to have a "beginner" kit (including butane torch for firing) for about $140, but is there any cheaper way for me to try it first? Is it as easy as it looks?
Thanks!


Title: Re: Has anyone tried Precious Metal Clay?
Post by: hollyjones on March 10, 2005 10:01:30 AM
I'm really interested in trying this too! I'm going to the library over the weekend to check out a book on it.
My friend told me I could use my gas oven instead of a torch.


Title: Re: Has anyone tried Precious Metal Clay?
Post by: krazigal72 on March 10, 2005 11:08:51 AM
check out this thread....
https://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=10148.0

fyi...try doing a search before posting a question :)


Title: Re: Has anyone tried Precious Metal Clay?
Post by: Lothruin on March 12, 2005 06:54:09 AM
It looks like Fire Mountain Gems sells "Art Clay" which is similar to PMC, but not the same.  The kit looks useful.  My Rio Grande catalot sells actual PMC, and their starter kit is only $90, but it doesn't include all the tools.  It's got a 28gm block of PMC+ (8 more grams than the Art Clay kit), plus 1gm of PMC, 1 sheet of PMC paper and a 9gm syringe of PMC3 slip, plus video and instruction booklets.  It's another $75 for a torch and firing block.  Anyway, that $90 buys you a TON of clay.  The Art Clay kit is obviously an attempt to outfit you with most of the tools you'll need as well, which is probably why you'll pay more.  Even so, out of Rio, if you add a 28gm block of PMC for $32 to the $75 for the torch kit, and then fairly minimal $$ for the files and such, you can get pretty close to the same tool kit for about the same price, plus an additional 8gm of clay.  The only thing you couldn't afford to throw in for the same price would be the ring sizers. 

I was just thinking last night about trying the PMC for the first time. I want to make a penannular brooch for a friend of mine.  But I think I've decided on hammered 6 gauge wire instead.  And maybe a bit of the etching process someone posted about over in the "art" section a while back.  I just can't afford to try new things right now.  :D


Title: Re: Has anyone tried Precious Metal Clay?
Post by: Ayn on March 12, 2005 09:36:05 AM
Hi all ...
Sorry no I've never tried it & don't intend to.  First, from what I've seen of the finished stuff so far,I just plain don't care for the 'look' of it. ('course I have no idea what brand of clay was used for the items I've seen, nor whether the pieces were finished properly, etc etc etc -- -- but if it's all that complicated to get the stuff to look better, ok nevvver mind ... lol ... ... And second, I truly do not have either the time or the patience to start fussin around with any more ditsy stuff, especially not any more 'expensive' ditsy stuff like a kiln.  Like Lochuin, think maybe I'll just stick to real sterling for the time being!


Title: Re: Has anyone tried Precious Metal Clay?
Post by: Lothruin on March 12, 2005 12:07:30 PM
Ayn, the thing about the PMC is it turns out very nearly pure silver, rather than sterling.  It CAN be finished just like any fabricated or cast piece of silver.  Files, a flexshaft and a polishing tool will allow the finished product to be finished identically to any other piece of silver, and perhaps even easier than sterling because it is softer, being pure silver.  (Which, of course, has it's drawbacks as well.)  Most people who use the silver clay rather like the more natural and "artsy" look it gets without all the finishing.  It looks more like a clay piece, only in silver, which is part of its appeal.  But if you want to finish it, you can.

Here, if you scroll through, you can see the winners of the 2004 Saul Bell design awards for PMC.  I don't think any of them really look like most of the silver clay pieces I've seen.
http://www.saulbellaward.com/winners2004.htm


Title: Re: Has anyone tried Precious Metal Clay?
Post by: Ayn on March 14, 2005 09:10:27 AM

Hi Lothruin! and thanks. Guess what I shoulda said was I'll just stick to metal in the first place.  Not too fond of the idea of goin' through all that fuss & expense just to end up with metal anyway ... lol but then I'm just a plain ole beadstringer not a particularly artistic or crafts-clever person.


Title: Re: Has anyone tried Precious Metal Clay?
Post by: Lothruin on March 14, 2005 11:40:15 AM
I agree, Ayn.  It's something I've thought about trying, but in the end I can just use plain ol' metal for a lot of what I do.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Rylizbeth on March 16, 2005 07:25:27 AM
I got my info here.
 ;D
http://www.pmcsupply.com/tech.html


Title: Re: Has anyone tried Precious Metal Clay?
Post by: Anna D. on April 05, 2005 03:27:58 PM
I've wanted to try the Artclay silver......I figure someday when I can afford lampworking supplies I will get some and use the torch to fire whatever I make. I love clay so I look forward to trying it. :)


Title: Re: Has anyone tried Precious Metal Clay?
Post by: Diane B. on April 06, 2005 10:08:21 AM
Metal clays are fun, but not cheap to play with!  The expense is in the basic tools as well as in the price of the clay itself. 

I don't use it myself, but have collected some info on the two brands, and how to get more info on metal clay, on my website if you want to check it out:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/Characteristics.htm
(....click on "Metal Clays"in the list at the top of the page...)


HTH,

Diane B.


Title: Re: Has anyone tried Precious Metal Clay?
Post by: shes crafty on April 07, 2005 02:31:46 AM
Hi, I've used Art Clay (different from Precious Metal Clay) and it's okay.  I've taken 2 classes and made about 5-6 items.  I'm trying (damn school and loans and stuff) to become a jeweler and wanted to try it...It dries very fast and is definately not cheap.  You don't necessarily have to have a kiln, you can have a torch, but a kiln heats more evenly.
I think I prefer to skip the clay aspect, leaving that to pottery, and just stick to regular metalsmithing techniques. But this is just me...


Title: help! paranoid about patina/PMC!
Post by: wine_slut on April 15, 2005 11:30:11 AM
newbie here, and did search to see if there were any specific discussions about this before hand.

:takes a deep breath:

I'm about to embark on my first time PMC project, and I'm afraid I've read so many (too many?) explanations of how to patina. Can anyone help shed some light?

1. I bought liver of sulfur, but I bought it as a liquid solution. Most of the explanations I've read only talk about using the dry form. Is the 331-031 solution I have very strong? (I'd like to use a very dilute form, as per everything I've read). If it's strong, should I cut it with what--water? Something else?

2. Can anyone explain the relationship of LOS vs. ammonia to me? Some patina explanations mix ammonia WITH the LOS , other explanations suggest you use the amonia seperately. Is amonia only for irridescent effects? What works best with your experience?

And does the ammonia have to be clear, or can it be the sudsy type I found in the grocery store?

3. How important is warm/cold with this process? Most accounts I've read suggest that the piece (or the LOS) should be warm, but then are you also supposed to shock the piece in a cold water bath after each dip?

thanks for all of your advice!

<edited to thank whomever moved this to a more appropiate location>


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Valoir on May 03, 2005 12:22:59 PM
I used that pre-mixed solution, but I cannot remember if I diluted it with water.  It should say on the package. 

Sometimes people recommend adding a few drops of ammonia to a cup or two of solution, theoretically it brings out the colors.  I use the clear ammonia which shouldn't be difficult to find. 

I do think that heating the solution it to a warm temperature works best.  I warm it in the microwave, or if I am adding water, add warm water.

The other thing I noticed about the solution was that the unused solution (still in the container) went bad after about 6 months - it just turned things brown rather than getting the nice colors.  That's when I switched back to the lump form, because LOS works a lot better as a fresh solution. 

Just remember that it is totally unpredicatable and that depending on whether the piece is clean or has oils on it, the temperature, the freshness, etc. you will get different results.  You may also look at the ganoksin.com website.  Tons of jeweler-created questions and answers. 

Valerie/Valoir
www.valoirdesigns.com


Title: Art Clay?
Post by: tcap on May 11, 2005 11:37:16 AM
Has anyone tried making silver jewelry using Art Clay? Here's a link:

http://www.firemountaingems.com/artclay.asp

I'm intrigued because it seems much easier to do than lost wax method, but I wonder if the finished result REALLY looks like silver. I'd hate to invest all the money in the starter kit and butane torch and then not really like the result.


Title: Re: Art Clay?
Post by: craftsurge on May 17, 2005 02:00:45 PM
Hi tcap

I have been using Art Clay for 6 months or so now and I really am liking it. here is a link to a similar thread:

https://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=32157.0

You can get a mirror finish from art clay, here is one of my certification pieces:



It is not even fully buffed yet! This center of the pendant is a piece of dichroic glass. This was a real easy project and took only an hour or so!
Good luck! I hope you enjoy experimenting with it!


Title: Re: Art Clay?
Post by: Rylizbeth on May 18, 2005 07:28:26 AM
Hi tcap

I have been using Art Clay for 6 months or so now and I really am liking it. here is a link to a similar thread:

https://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=32157.0

You can get a mirror finish from art clay, here is one of my certification pieces:



It is not even fully buffed yet! This center of the pendant is a piece of dichroic glass. This was a real easy project and took only an hour or so!
Good luck! I hope you enjoy experimenting with it!


How did you achieve such a beautifully smooth finish?


Title: Re: Art Clay?
Post by: craftsurge on May 18, 2005 10:45:22 AM





How did you achieve such a beautifully smooth finish?

Thanks!
This is a trick i learned from my instructor. You can use "Wet Ones" wet wipes to smooth the surface during the green stage (before it is fired). This really helps get it smooth.


Title: Re: Art Clay?
Post by: Rylizbeth on May 18, 2005 12:03:31 PM





How did you achieve such a beautifully smooth finish?

Thanks!
This is a trick i learned from my instructor. You can use "Wet Ones" wet wipes to smooth the surface during the green stage (before it is fired). This really helps get it smooth.

Thanks!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on July 30, 2005 11:27:55 AM
I thought I read somewhere that it's necessary to tumble PMC pieces after they're fired to harden the metal.  Is this true?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: ClassyLassy on August 04, 2005 09:47:58 PM
nope, it's not necessary but it does help, regardless the end result from pmc tends to be softer than using sheet metal, so anything to make it stronger does help. i've notice with using it though, that i've only had problems with deforming or breaking when i either made something extremely thin or made rings. the thinner rings tended to form to the shape of my finger after A LOT of wear, but i didn't think it was necessarily a bad thing. but it's nothing to worry about if you're using it for something like a pendant or earrings where it won't have a lot of stress on it. the main reason i typically tumble my finished pieces is to speed up polishing. it makes quite a difference and is a lot less frustrating than sitting and rubbing and scratching at the piece! (i appreciate anything that keeps the blood pressure down) hope that helped some!  ;)


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Tuff on August 05, 2005 07:55:44 AM
I fire mine in a kiln, but my friend bought a Hot Pot and it is awesome. I think it was $35, and the fluid is pretty inexpensive. There is no judgement involved, just light it and 10 or so minutes it is done. It takes me a few hours in my kiln from start to finish. With the torch you have to watch and there is very little forgiving. I think I'm going to buyn a hot pot even though I have a kiln.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: ClassyLassy on August 05, 2005 08:54:59 AM
i've been using a small kiln and torch too..how much are the hot pot's??


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Tuff on August 05, 2005 10:12:17 AM
Just checked...........They are up to $45 at PMC Connection. I remember my friend paying like $35 a little while ago.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Rylizbeth on August 05, 2005 11:01:13 AM
I use a torch now too, and I have screwed up a couple of things.  :( I may have to invest in a hot pot.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: ClassyLassy on August 05, 2005 12:17:08 PM
wow, that is so much cheaper than my kiln was..i think i'm going to have to do some research and possibly invest in one too.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on August 05, 2005 11:43:52 PM
nope, it's not necessary but it does help, regardless the end result from pmc tends to be softer than using sheet metal, so anything to make it stronger does help. i've notice with using it though, that i've only had problems with deforming or breaking when i either made something extremely thin or made rings. the thinner rings tended to form to the shape of my finger after A LOT of wear, but i didn't think it was necessarily a bad thing. but it's nothing to worry about if you're using it for something like a pendant or earrings where it won't have a lot of stress on it. the main reason i typically tumble my finished pieces is to speed up polishing. it makes quite a difference and is a lot less frustrating than sitting and rubbing and scratching at the piece! (i appreciate anything that keeps the blood pressure down) hope that helped some!  ;)

That does help a lot.  Thanks very much!  I may just try using a mallet to make my pieces stronger.... for the meantime anyway.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Tuff on August 10, 2005 05:19:26 AM
I didn't have time to go thru all the posts to see if someone recommended it, but I would NEVER try to harden my PMC with a mallet, it is much more brittle than sheet metal silver.


Title: Art Clay
Post by: millipede on August 15, 2005 12:36:45 PM
Have any of you worked with Art Clay? Tell me about it. I thinking about getting some to try out but I'd like to hear about your experiences using it.

http://www.artclayworld.com/


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: ClassyLassy on August 15, 2005 07:00:02 PM
i've used it before, but i'll have to go look through my notes and projects to remember how it worked out before i reply. just want to make sure i give the right info rather than accidentally talking about another kind...


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Valoir on August 16, 2005 06:38:50 AM
I am certified artisan with both companies (PMC and ACS).  The differences are very subtle - kind of like Pepsi versus Coke.  They do offer a few different products (ACS has an oil paste that you can paint on glazed porcelain).  The skills you would learn working with one brand of silver clay would be the same skills to use the other.  They fire at relatively the same temperatures, etc. 
Have fun!
Valerie
www.valoirdesigns.com


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on August 16, 2005 08:31:28 AM
Have any of you worked with Art Clay? Tell me about it. I thinking about getting some to try out but I'd like to hear about your experiences using it.

http://www.artclayworld.com/

I recently completed my level 1 certification with Art clay. I am not sure if PMC has this yet, but Art Clay offers a low fire "slow dry" clay that enables you a lot more working time with the clay. I have used all the varieties and like this one the best.  Since it is low fire you can still fire it with a torch.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Tuff on August 16, 2005 08:44:32 AM
Oddly enough, most of the serious jewelry designers that I know use art clay as opposed to PMC. Not sure if it because it has been around longer or not. I use PMC because it has nicer colors on the package.  :-\


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: smokingmonkey on August 18, 2005 04:48:24 PM
I just bought a PMC3 Hot Pot Kit with tools and clay to make a ring. I haven't tried it yet as I need to get some sculpey first to practice.

My question is - has anyone tried firing Art Clay in the Hot Pot? Since the two products are so similar?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Tuff on August 19, 2005 05:21:00 AM
What temp does art clay say to fire at? Off hand I think PMC is 1675, for like 20 minutes, someone might want to confirm that.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: goose on the Loose on August 19, 2005 03:24:58 PM
Art Clay is actually different from PMC on a molecular level in that the microscopic particles are smaller.  For that reason, Art Clay silver does indeed fire at a lower temp.  Off the top of my head I think it's like 1490f for about a half hour.  I've fired the standard and slow dry standard at 1650 - it's not recommended to do this for more than five minutes.  I prefer the standard series to the low fire because it is less expensive and I'm more interested in sculpture than working with glass which is where the low fire is really important. 
In my experience Art Clay Silver IS better than PMC for a number of reasons...
1. ACS is made with recycled rather than newly mined silver.
2. It is more 'refined' - you can burnish & smooth ACS in it's green state (pre fired but bone dry) - It actually LOOKS like silver before you fire it and depending on the type of piece I've actually had ACS smooth almost shiny right out of the kiln.
I know it sounds crazy - you just have to try both PMC & ACS to see for yourself. 
3. Although ACS is discontinuing the 'Standard Series' argh - I LOVE SLOW DRY!  It's not pasty & doesn't 'pull' or snag on instruments at any stage of drying. 
4.  ACS doesn't break (ring shanks for instance) in the green state which is great for me because I love carving it.  I guess that because the molecules are smaller the bond is stronger from the beginning.
Hope this helps - I don't mean to sound like a nancy know it all - I've worked with both products for a couple of years now & have made many mistakes & many really cool discoveries.
J


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Valoir on August 22, 2005 02:32:38 PM
I work with both clays as well and it sounds like Goose on the Loose has presented you the ACS marketing lines.  I advise people to try both brands of clay and decide which they think is "better" based on how they work with the clay. 

The clays are very similar, and you work with them the same ways.  You do want to fire it for the time and temperature listed on the package.  The low temperature Art Clay Silver should work in the hotpot, since it roughly corresponds to the temperatures of the PMC3 product. 

Another trick to making PMC dry more slowly is to add a drop of glycerin, work it in and let the clay rest for about 30 minutes.  It makes the clay not try out as fast. 

Keep in mind that there is trial and error involved with creating with the silver clays.  But it is really fun.




Title: metal clay - would you like to know more about it?
Post by: Kaku on September 11, 2005 09:50:35 AM
What is metal clay?  It is a wonderful form of fine silver (or pure gold) mixed with an organic binder and water.  This form allows you to mold and texture the metal, then when it is fired in a kiln, the binder burns away leaving just pure silver or gold.  I teach metal clay classes in Colorado and just finished a book, Metal Clay Magic, published by Kalmbach (same folks who do Bead and Button  and Art Jewelry magazines).  You can see more info at tonnbodesign.com or examples at nanajewelry.com Theres a bunch of links in there leading you to other interesting metal clay sites.  I really enjoy introducing this medium to beaders and artists who want to add a touch of original silver pieces without taking a whole silversmitihing course.  Hope this inspires you to try it!  Kaku


Title: Re: metal clay - would you like to know more about it?
Post by: Kaku on September 11, 2005 10:59:01 AM
I got a message which may be of interest to others - kaku

I found your website from the posting on Craftster. I'm wondering whether it is realistic for a beginner to order metal clay and make pieces out of it. How complicated is the process?
And do you sell it?
 
 Thanks,
 
C. Metrycki

Try reading some of the books on metal first and if you are willing to make some mistakes, try it!  I usually teach my beginners in one afternoon to make a finished piece. A good beginner project is the textured heart pin in my book. My book, Metal Clay Magic, is sold through my website tonnbodesign.com. Read the intro, sections on supplies, technical tips and select an easy project.  Get the little portable kiln "Hot Pot" or if you don't mind playing with fire, use a butane torch (read about it in the book).  It is easier than it sounds. If you can get a friend to try it with you it is more fun.  I do have some basic supplies listed on my website and there is a list of suppliers' websites in the book, too. Pick a day you have the kitchen to yourself, pour a glass of wine (to drink) and go for it!   



Title: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: vermontkindgoods on September 27, 2005 08:04:15 AM
Never Mind! Didn't realize there was a big thread about it already!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Valoir on September 27, 2005 09:08:13 AM
I work with it all the time.  I do have a kiln and find that to give me more consistent results than torch firing.  I also have metalsmith training and worked as a jewelry designer for a custom jewelry.  I only mention that because I think all of the knowledge adds to getting good results with the silver clay. 
Check my website: www.valoirdesigns.com.  I was also on crafters-coast to coast - the episode just repeated last week, if you can get ahold of that it shows how to set a gemstone and torch firing.

Here are some images of my first creations, from about 3 years ago:



Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on October 09, 2005 07:52:38 PM
I bought PMC3 a little while back and just opened it up tonight.  I was expecting a clay like substance, but it's so wet I can't even pick it up.  Is there something wrong with it? Should I return it?  Could I have done something to make it the way it is or is it suppose to be that way?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Valoir on October 10, 2005 02:20:11 PM
Sounds like you got a package of the paste form, rather than the clay form.  Did it come in a little jar? 


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on October 10, 2005 03:02:42 PM
Ah you're right... it says it on the top of the package... hard to see.   Of course they did not mention that it was paste on the site I bought it from at all.  Think I should complain?  Lots of the product got wasted because it stuck to the plastic I was working with/ my hands, etc.

http://www.lacytools.ca/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/13050


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Valoir on October 11, 2005 12:10:40 PM
If you let the stuff dry on the plastic, you can scrape it off and put it back into the slip jar - (this is before firing, of course).
It is probably worth telling the place you ordered from that their website really lacks the proper description for this product.
You should probably order from a place that has PMC as their focus, you can get some discount prices, too!   have had good luck ordering from Whole lotta whimsy and PMC123.com also Rio Grande and PMC Connection are ok.
Good luck. 


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: samba on October 13, 2005 12:22:58 PM
Hi everyone, just wanted to post some of my pmc (Precious Metal Clay) creations.
I've been only doing this for about 6mos.   Hope you like. (New pictures)




Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on October 14, 2005 06:08:14 AM
WOW! These are amazing! The middle necklace in the third picture is my favorite! very nice!!

Hi everyone, just wanted to post some of my pmc (Precious Metal Clay) creations.
I've been only doing this for about 6mos. (I know... lighting's bad).  Hope you like.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: argentice on October 25, 2005 09:09:15 AM
I bought PMC3 a little while back and just opened it up tonight.  I was expecting a clay like substance, but it's so wet I can't even pick it up.  Is there something wrong with it? Should I return it?  Could I have done something to make it the way it is or is it suppose to be that way?

Yes, it does sound like this is the paste (slip).

Don't let it go to waste.  Paint 3 or 4 coats of it on the back of small leaf, leaving it to dry each time.  The back of a leaf if usually more textured than the front.  You  should have a nice leafy shaped pendant/brooch/earrings after you fire it.


Title: specific PMC question
Post by: nikita on November 15, 2005 11:48:59 AM
for you PMC smarties...

do you if it's possible to combine glass and PMC in a piece?  the research i've done seems to indicate that PMC3, which has the lowest firing temp (?) could maybe work, but the examples i've come across all seem to incorporate fancy fused glass which i think is a lot stronger than what i want to work with.

the basic question is: can i take a picture, copper tape/solder it between two pieces of thin glass (or a piece of glass and a piece of something else) and put PMC around it?  or is that just a recipe for an explosion?  i'm afraid it might be.

did any of that make sense?  thanks much for any assistance.

xo
n


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Valoir on November 18, 2005 06:47:43 AM
Well, anything like paper is going to ignite at about 700 degrees.  Copper doesn't work too well either, because it is a "dirty" metal and oxidizes (turns black and crusty) when it is heated to the temperature you need to fire PMC3 at.  I fires PMC3 at 1200 for 35 minutes. Also, glass that isn't made for kiln work is very touchy and tempermental when you heat it.  You may know that glass is actually a liquid, it only acts like a solid at room temperature.  When they make glass for fusing or kiln work, they process it in a way to make the molecules more uniform and predictable in the heating and cooling process.

All that said, lots of people use PMC to make mini picture frame things.  You should look at the website of Sherri Haab - www.sherrihaab.com - she makes the frame first out of silver clay, then adds a photo and epoxy over it. 

for more info on glass in the kiln, check out www.warmglass.com
Good luck!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: nikita on November 18, 2005 12:04:49 PM
Valoir -

Thank you SO incredibly much. The Sherri Haab stuff is *exactly* what I was hoping to do...and I was going to reply, saying "do you think she'd mind if I tried to do something similar myself or is she very protective of her technique, etc. etc." and then I saw she's posted a blessed tutorial on how to do it. 

You totally made my day!

xo
n


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: lovemylabs on November 18, 2005 07:51:54 PM
Hi everyone, just wanted to post some of my pmc (Precious Metal Clay) creations.
I've been only doing this for about 6mos.   Hope you like. (New pictures)

WOW!  Those are awesome!  I bought a starter kit from Rings-Things.com over a month ago and still have yet to make anything.  I'm too scared I'll mess it up!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on November 28, 2005 06:42:46 PM
Thanks to Valoir and argentice for the advice.  I finally contacted the store that I bought the slip from and told them it would be nice for them to have better descriptions of their products on their website.

You should probably order from a place that has PMC as their focus, you can get some discount prices, too!   have had good luck ordering from Whole lotta whimsy and PMC123.com also Rio Grande and PMC Connection are ok.
Good luck. 

I just ordered some PMC from Whole Lotta Whimsy.  I was worried about the shipping cost being high for an international order, but it was only $5.

edit: Shipping ended up being closer to $15 USD.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: tinybits on January 03, 2006 07:39:36 AM
i've seen PMC3's ads on a jewelery design magazine and i realized that it could be a cool solution for wedding rings. due to our religion men cannot wear any gold so he has to has silver ring matching with the gold one and i really dont like gold at all. so i have been playing with this idea lately and i noticed that the prices are fairly cheap and they say that it is possible to cook it up on fire with a metal frame.

what do you suggest for a ring design? what should i use to shape the ring? it shrinks so it means i have to design bigger?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: meshell on January 13, 2006 02:09:29 PM
I didn't get to read through this whole thread, but it caught my eye because I'm PMC certified and teach workshops in my area.  I love that so many people are interested in PMC!

tinybits, in response to your question about making rings, you're right, you do need to make your ring bigger than the size you ultimately want it to be. 

For ring making, I suggest using PMC+ over standard PMC or PMC3.  Also, the reccommended firing time for PMC+ is 30 minutes at 1470 degrees.  However, if you fire it for 2 hours at 1650 (it will not hurt the metal), the resulting density with be the same as cast fine silver!  The higher density is helpful because rings receive so much handling...it makes the ring a much more durable piece.

As far as forming a ring, you have quite a few options.  If you're good with math, you can calculate the shrinkage rates and determine how much bigger your ring needs to be.  PMC+ shrinks about 12%.  If you're uncomfortable doing the math, you can order ring forms that are sized to account for the shrinkage.  I know www.riogrande.com carries them, and I'm sure other PMC suppliers do as well.  Just make sure you get the ones for PMC+ because standard PMC has a much higher percentage of shrinkage.  Then you can roll out strips or round pieces and simply build around the ring form!

I hope that helps!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: batgirl on January 13, 2006 02:14:00 PM
Valoir, you teach classes in the twin cities, right? Do you have any coming up in the next few months?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: argentice on January 17, 2006 07:40:52 AM
For ring making, I suggest using PMC+ over standard PMC or PMC3.

Hi meshell,

I wondered why you recomended PMC+ over PMC3 for rings?  PMC3 when fired is harder than PMC+, yet had a lower firing temperature.  It has smaller grains of silver and thus bonds more tightly.

I've been wearing a PMC3 ring for about 18 months and it has not deformed yet, so usually I recomend PMC3 for making rings :)

I'm not saying you are wrong  :)  Just like to know why PMC+  ;D


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: meshell on January 17, 2006 08:25:15 AM
Hi argentice,

You are absolutely right about PMC3 firing at a lower temperature, and it is the most dense of all three clays.  And it is great for making rings!

However, in my experiences PMC3 tends to be very sticky, and for someone who is just starting to work with metal clay, PMC+ seems more manageable.  Even at my certification, I recall people having more difficulties with the PMC3.

That said, using a bit of extender in the PMC3 seems to help a lot.  And, of course, there are many great reasons to use PMC3 (lower firing temp/shorter firing time/more possibilities to embed stones/glass...)...

Thanks for pointing out my error.  I should have clarified that there is nothing wrong with using PMC3 for rings...I just think PMC+ is easier for beginners. :)


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: rebeccaks on February 02, 2006 07:50:53 PM
someone mentioned earlier that Art Clay was used with recycled silver, not newly mined silver.
is this true? is this true with any other brand of metal clay?
thanks.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Murky on February 09, 2006 09:37:09 PM
Can anyone tell me how big the space is in the hot pot kiln?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Valoir on February 10, 2006 07:46:19 AM
Regarding the recycled silver question - Yes, Art Clay does make that claim. 
I also spoke with Tim McCreight (the PMC guru) about it, and he said it would be pretty close to impossible to know the exact origins of the silver used, since there are many sources for reclaimed silver from many different industries.  He says PMC has reclaimed silver in it as well. 

As far as the size of the hot pot, I have not used it, but I think the space is about 3 inches diameter. 


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: mamaofsugarbaby on February 27, 2006 05:39:07 PM
I just saw a show about PMC today on HGTV-go to thier website and check out CRAFTERS COAST TO COAST- hope this helps! WWW.HGTV.COM


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: rebeccaks on February 28, 2006 09:46:54 AM
I saw that too. It was Valoir!
I had never seen the show, she mentioned in this thread she was on it, so the first time I saw it, I saw her.

You were great!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Valoir on February 28, 2006 11:52:59 AM
Aww, shucks.  Thanks for noticing me on HGTV. 

And yes, I do teach classes in Minneapolis, and I sometimes go on the road to Wisconsin too.  Feel free to contact me to get on my mailing list.

Valerie/Valoir



Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: batgirl on February 28, 2006 12:05:07 PM
And another Craftster celebrity is born! Congrats, Valoir!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on March 16, 2006 07:53:40 AM
...just wanted to bring some attention to my first (sucessful) PMC pendant.



https://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=84577.0


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: nicegirl512 on March 24, 2006 08:08:09 AM
Can anyone tell me how big the space is in the hot pot kiln?

If you're concerned about the size of the hot pot because you want to make a big/dense piece, you probably need to stick with a kiln.  The hot pot is limited to 30 gr (or something like that) of clay at a time, because it's a relatively short firing time so a larger piece won't get fired all the way.  At least this is what I've read!  I got my starter kit this week, hoping to find some time in my (as ever) overbooked weekend to play with it.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay & Art Clay Silver
Post by: animegirlie on June 13, 2006 01:07:47 PM

I want to get certified and I am having a big problem - I can't find an Art Clay class in my area. (and I live in Los Angeles!!)

I was looking into taking classes and it turns out OTIS has classes!!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on August 03, 2006 08:18:25 PM
ugh, I managed to grow some MOLD on my homemade PMC slip.  haha


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: meshell on August 04, 2006 07:46:15 PM
ugh, I managed to grow some MOLD on my homemade PMC slip.  haha

The mold won't hurt or affect the PMC in anyway, so no worries! :)


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on August 13, 2006 01:44:51 PM
Little experiment...

I tried to include some micro glass beads in a piece and it turned out pretty interesting....

one of these is treated with Liver of sulfer (the one on the right) -
the microbeads were green and came out orange-y yellow from the kiln.
I might try it again and do a better job placing them next time



Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on August 13, 2006 01:55:33 PM
Nice idea! ...and it's interesting to hear about the beads change in colour. I think I prefer the one without the liver of sulpher, personally.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on August 13, 2006 04:15:40 PM
So, I tried this idea again, feeling a bit more confident... I just decorated the outside of a bead I made using a syringe of Art Clay Silver and Dipped it into the microbeads. I tried 2 different colors this time with similar color changing results. I think I am going to test some new colors in a kiln and see what happens to them. I like the way this came out though, it has sort of an olive green hue to it. (hard to tell from the pictures) The first shot is a before shot so you can see what color the beads were before the firing.



Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on October 26, 2006 05:46:32 PM
Does anyone have any suggestions on how to repair cracks in already fired PMC?  I thought I had repaired them before hand but now that my piece has been fired I can see them.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on October 26, 2006 07:52:46 PM
Art Clay Silver sells a product called oil paste that will adhere to already fired metal clay. You can brush it over the cracks, smooth and sand, and then fire the piece again.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on October 26, 2006 08:10:02 PM
Thanks.  I've read about oil paste, but didn't know that it was used for cracks. Do you think that regular slip could be used to repair cracks as well?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: meshell on October 26, 2006 08:37:54 PM
You can use regular slip.  I would paint one coat over the crack, then let it dry, and paint another coat, let it dry...and repeat until the crack is filled.  Then smooth it with sandpaper and refire.

You can also roll a snake of regular clay and use that to fill in the cracking.  Then smooth it with sandpaper and refire.

Hope that helps!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: craftsurge on October 27, 2006 07:12:30 AM
You can use regular slip.  I would paint one coat over the crack, then let it dry, and paint another coat, let it dry...and repeat until the crack is filled.  Then smooth it with sandpaper and refire.

You can also roll a snake of regular clay and use that to fill in the cracking.  Then smooth it with sandpaper and refire.

Hope that helps!

I tried using slip to repair some cracks and after I fired it the layer kind of flaked off.... why do you think that happened? Do you have to sand the surface before you apply the slip? It was a flat surface, so maybe when it shrank in the kiln it just couldn't cover the area and peeled away from it??  I wish I had a picture of it...


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on October 29, 2006 02:12:44 PM
I used slip and then pressed clay into the cracks.  I hope it works!  I will post back after it dries and I refine and refire it.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: tinybits on October 29, 2006 11:15:36 PM
i have a question for those who works with PMC alot.. is it possible to have rings with PMC? my idea is to have our first rings casted with PMC so the design can be unique. but i am not sure about if the PMC is durable enough to have it as something this important.. i would love to be sure that it wont break or something... ::)


Title: Precious Metal Clay (pmc) question ... for those of you who have used it
Post by: babychel on November 03, 2006 10:33:21 AM
Thanks for reading me! 

2 questions -

do you need to have a kiln or can you just bake it in the oven?

and

do you need to have a tumbler to achieve the shiny finish?

Thanks so much!  *kisses!*




Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: meshell on November 03, 2006 07:01:07 PM
Tinybits, it is possible to make rings with PMC, and I have seen some really cool results that are durable.  However, there are many many ways to create a unique design in metal.  Since you mentioned casting, I'm not sure if you might be interested in actually making wax ring models that could be cast in silver.  Cast silver does have a higher density than PMC (and is therefore more durable).

Babychel, regular ovens don't get hot enough to fire pmc, but you may not need a kiln.  Some artists torch fire their pieces or use really small kilns made especially for pmc.  I did a quick search, and you can see the types of kilns here: http://www.silver-clay.com/nmclay-bin/shop1.pl/page=Kilns.htm/SID=PUT_SID_HERE

Tumblers are definitely the easiest way to get a shiny finish on your piece.  But you can also make it shiny by brushing your piece with a steel or brash brush (and soapy water) or burnishing it with a burnishing tool.

Hope that helps!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on November 03, 2006 07:29:15 PM
I'm very low-tech when it comes to pmc, I fire with a torch and burnish by hand. 


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on November 05, 2006 12:39:26 PM
I used slip and then pressed clay into the cracks.  I hope it works!  I will post back after it dries and I refine and refire it.

It worked!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: nicegirl512 on December 30, 2006 02:42:27 PM
I'm very low-tech when it comes to pmc, I fire with a torch and burnish by hand. 

Would a butane torch get hot enough?  Or do you have a fanciness acetylene and oxygen setup?  (And if so I'm jealous.)  I bought my PMC3 stuff ages ago and still am too intidimated to try it.  I'm kind of making it a new year's resolution to do *something* with it this weekend.

Does anyone use the ceramic fire kiln?  The one that uses gel fuel?  I bought that one but wonder how well it works/how precise it is.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neigung on December 30, 2006 06:54:00 PM
Yep! Butane torches get hot enough... that's all I use for PMC at home.


Title: Switching from PMC to Art Clay Silver?
Post by: Neigung on January 07, 2007 02:16:27 PM
The only type of PMC I've used so far is PMC3, which I understand is different from the other types of PMC because it can be fired at a lower temperature. Anyway, I'm thinking about switching over to Art Clay because of the lack of Canadian suppliers of PMC... and I'm assuming that Art Clay 650 is probably the closest match to PMC3, is this right?  Is there any other major differences between the two clays that I should be aware of??


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: norsgoebel on January 08, 2007 07:03:59 PM
I received a starter kit for Christmas and have been slowly getting used to it.  This is my first pendant I made and I also made a letter N key chain for a friend.


I've read that PMC3 can be fired on a gas stove top but have not found any info on that.  Anyone familiar with that technique?  I was also taken aback by how sticky the PMC3 was, it was quite hard to work with.  I usually work with polymer clay and was expecting that kind of consistency I guess.  Do you know if there is a method for leaching the clay , like you can with polymer to make it more firm and manageable? Thanks for all the info, I've read through this whole thread!


Title: Re: Switching from PMC to Art Clay Silver?
Post by: craftsurge on January 08, 2007 07:51:05 PM
The only type of PMC I've used so far is PMC3, which I understand is different from the other types of PMC because it can be fired at a lower temperature. Anyway, I'm thinking about switching over to Art Clay because of the lack of Canadian suppliers of PMC... and I'm assuming that Art Clay 650 is probably the closest match to PMC3, is this right?  Is there any other major differences between the two clays that I should be aware of??
I haven't used PMC3 much.. but I remember it being very similar to the ACS650. I have read on different msg boards that a lot of people find them very similar. I am curious what you think if you end up making the switch

I received a starter kit for Christmas and have been slowly getting used to it.  This is my first pendant I made and I also made a letter N key chain for a friend.

I've read that PMC3 can be fired on a gas stove top but have not found any info on that.  Anyone familiar with that technique?   Do you know if there is a method for leaching the clay , like you can with polymer to make it more firm and manageable? Thanks for all the info, I've read through this whole thread!

I think your pendant is amazing!! I have not fired on a gas stove. I have used a butane torch and a kiln to fire my pieces. As far as the stickiness issue goes - if the clay is very wet it can be too sticky but it will always have a certain amount of stickiness to it. you can use a little bit of olive oil or badger balm on your hands to act as a barrier and that might help the clay from sticking to your hands. you can also rub a small amount of Olive oil on your tools to help with the stickiness. Hope that helps! Have fun experimenting!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: kiwiblue on January 09, 2007 01:02:27 AM
Love the pendant  ...I'm taking A Class I'm March..Ill let ya know if I pick up any tips  about the stickiness  Its suppose to be A really good teacher ....PS: I'm jealous you got my present !! Bad Santa !!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: mirela on January 09, 2007 06:11:35 AM
Super nice! You mean that is not silver?? it looks so alike...

I wish I know how to do this...


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Rylizbeth on January 09, 2007 11:59:00 AM
Yep! Butane torches get hot enough... that's all I use for PMC at home.

I use a Hot Pot. Works fine for me.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: mmd32 on January 09, 2007 01:16:54 PM
Super nice! You mean that is not silver?? it looks so alike...

I wish I know how to do this...

It IS silver...it's just made in a completely new, different way.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: mirela on January 11, 2007 09:46:36 AM
Ohhh I see! I have read some more about this and found that incredible things can be made out of it...
I am brand new to this...so I think i'll practice in regular clay first and then hopefully move to PMC...
I'm loving your pendant and really wish I could do the same!


Title: Re: Switching from PMC to Art Clay Silver?
Post by: Neigung on January 11, 2007 06:06:09 PM
The only type of PMC I've used so far is PMC3, which I understand is different from the other types of PMC because it can be fired at a lower temperature. Anyway, I'm thinking about switching over to Art Clay because of the lack of Canadian suppliers of PMC... and I'm assuming that Art Clay 650 is probably the closest match to PMC3, is this right?  Is there any other major differences between the two clays that I should be aware of??
I haven't used PMC3 much.. but I remember it being very similar to the ACS650. I have read on different msg boards that a lot of people find them very similar. I am curious what you think if you end up making the switch

Thanks for the reply!  I will definitely post back once I try out ACS650.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: PixieDust721 on March 14, 2007 09:16:06 AM
Hi!  I recently purchaced a small kiln specifically to fire pmc (and eventually glass beads when i have more money for a tourch and what not). 

So being the type of person that acts then thinks, i did not do the propper research.  My question is, do i need a kiln shelf when firing?
Is there anything else that can be used instead?  I am having trouble finding a kiln shelf small enough for the kiln (6x6x4.5''), i may have to order one from the company. 

Also is there any tools that are necessary?  So far I am planning on getting a file for before and after and possibley something to polish it.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: meshell on March 14, 2007 01:22:26 PM
Hi!  I recently purchaced a small kiln specifically to fire pmc (and eventually glass beads when i have more money for a tourch and what not). 

So being the type of person that acts then thinks, i did not do the propper research.  My question is, do i need a kiln shelf when firing?
Is there anything else that can be used instead?  I am having trouble finding a kiln shelf small enough for the kiln (6x6x4.5''), i may have to order one from the company. 

Also is there any tools that are necessary?  So far I am planning on getting a file for before and after and possibley something to polish it.

Well, one nice thing about PMC is that you can put it in when the kiln is hot and remove it before the kiln cools down.  If you plan on doing that, you should get the kiln shelf and little ceramic legs for it to stand on...as well as a firing fork.

I'm not sure how much that kiln shelf would cost you, but a cheaper option might be to buy a stainless steel firing rack and put a non-asbestos hot pad on it.  You can fire your PMC directly on top of the hot pad, I do it all the time.  When you get the firing rack, you use pliers to bend each corner to a right angle--that gives it little feet to stand on.

Anyway, Thompson Enamel is a really nice supplier if you are looking for one.  The stuff I mentioned is on this page: http://thompsonenamel.com/products/tools/firing.htm

Hope that helps!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: PixieDust721 on March 14, 2007 03:04:47 PM
...as well as a firing fork....non-asbestos hot pad

Thanks so much for the link and the advice!  I have two more questions for you now though, Does the fork's handle become so hot that are gloves neccessary?  And is the hot pad soft enough to be cut to size?  Thanks again!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: meshell on March 15, 2007 03:16:52 AM
...as well as a firing fork....non-asbestos hot pad

Thanks so much for the link and the advice!  I have two more questions for you now though, Does the fork's handle become so hot that are gloves necessary?  And is the hot pad soft enough to be cut to size?  Thanks again!

No problem! 

The firing fork should have a wooden handle and metal guard on the end and does not get hot.  You might want to make sure that the fork part has a small enough opening to still fit in your kiln!  One reason you might want gloves is if your kiln door gets very hot...sometimes you need a glove to get the door open, depending on how it is insulated.  Just to be certain, your kiln opens to the front, like a microwave or oven, right?

Second, the hot pad is soft, and I believe it could be cut down.  I have never tried it, but I don't see why not.

Third, I would pick up some vermiculite from a garden center.  You can make a small pile of it on top of the hot pad and fire it in the kiln.  I use it to help support curved or round pieces.  The vermiculite changes color after the first firing, but you can use it again and again...

Sorry I'm so wordy!  Let me know if you need clarification.  Also, I wouldn't hesitate to call Thompson to ask questions about the firing materials.  I've called before and talked to them at conferences, and they've always been very helpful.

Good luck!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: fg0d on July 24, 2007 03:16:19 PM
Guys, I need help. I plan on making a necklace with a little baby hand on the end, based on a doll hand. How should I go about it? Should I make a mold, or just cover the item in PMC paste? I'm kinda new to this. I'd like to keep the detail in the fingers, like the creases and finger nails, so it's obviously a child's hand. Any tips are welcome. Thanks.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: PixieDust721 on July 25, 2007 04:59:32 AM
Guys, I need help. I plan on making a necklace with a little baby hand on the end, based on a doll hand. How should I go about it? Should I make a mold, or just cover the item in PMC paste? I'm kinda new to this. I'd like to keep the detail in the fingers, like the creases and finger nails, so it's obviously a child's hand. Any tips are welcome. Thanks.

i'm pretty new my self, but if the hand is made of plastic it would probably melt.  and a ceramic hand might crack, but i am not sure.  I would go with the mold to be safe and to keep the details.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: meshell on July 26, 2007 09:58:28 PM
Guys, I need help. I plan on making a necklace with a little baby hand on the end, based on a doll hand. How should I go about it? Should I make a mold, or just cover the item in PMC paste? I'm kinda new to this. I'd like to keep the detail in the fingers, like the creases and finger nails, so it's obviously a child's hand. Any tips are welcome. Thanks.

PixieDust is right, if you put paste on the hand, the plastic will melt and burn out inside of your kiln.  This is ok if you have proper ventilation, but if not, it will smell bad (not too mention bad for the environment...).  The other problem with painting paste on the outside of the hand is that once it is fired, you will be left with a rather thin hollow form.

I would suggest using a 2-part cold molding silicone to create a mold of the plastic hand.  This is the brand I use (I just did a google search, and it was the first one to come up): http://metalclay.com/rpm-cart/product.phtml?ProdID=BelSil-70g
It sets in 15-25 minutes once you have mixed the two parts together.  Also, the silicone surface is great because PMC will not stick to it.

Another alternative would be to shape a hand out of the lump clay and use tools to put add the creases/nails.  You could practice making some out of sculpey, then try the real one in PMC!

Hope that helps!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Kirrashi on August 05, 2007 01:26:31 PM
Hello! I'm looking into trying PMC/Art Clay Silver and I want to know more about firing it..  I don't particularly want to spend a lot of money on a kiln specifically for it, but I think I would be uncomfortable with a torch.. (Perhaps I could have someone help who isn't though.)

I have a small ceramics kiln in my garage, does anyone know if this would work for pmc/acs? It hasn't been used in a while, so it would probably need to be cleaned and checked to make sure it worked properly but that would definately be less expensive than buying a new one.

One more thing, how much filing/sandoing/buffing is actually needed? Starter kits come with lots of various tools, but how many of them are actually important? Can I use tools that I've been using for polymer clay?

thanks for reading all that! :)


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: meshell on August 08, 2007 09:00:16 AM
Hello! I'm looking into trying PMC/Art Clay Silver and I want to know more about firing it..  I don't particularly want to spend a lot of money on a kiln specifically for it, but I think I would be uncomfortable with a torch.. (Perhaps I could have someone help who isn't though.)

I have a small ceramics kiln in my garage, does anyone know if this would work for pmc/acs? It hasn't been used in a while, so it would probably need to be cleaned and checked to make sure it worked properly but that would definately be less expensive than buying a new one.

One more thing, how much filing/sandoing/buffing is actually needed? Starter kits come with lots of various tools, but how many of them are actually important? Can I use tools that I've been using for polymer clay?

thanks for reading all that! :)

I have never used a ceramics kiln for PMC, but as long as your kiln can achieve the proper firing temp (and hold it there for the necessary time), I think it would work.  I think the main disadvantage is that even a small ceramics kiln is probably a lot larger than a jewelers kiln, thus takes more time and money to heat it...

I think the starter kits are very helpful, but there are definitely other options.  Look at the tools in the starter kit, and see what you have that you could use instead.  Then just experiment!

One thing to remember is that you should do as much finishing as possible before you fire the piece.  It is much easier to sand hardened clay than a fine silver object.  When you are sanding clay, you can use fine sandpapers or emery boards/nail files.  If you find a rough edge after the piece has been fired, you'll need small files and sandpaper to smooth it.

Also, when fired PMC comes out of the kiln, it has a white look to it.  The silver needs to be burnished to look shiney.  Many people do this by tumbling their work, but you can also rub the piece with a burnishing tool.

Good luck--let us know how everything goes!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Kirrashi on August 08, 2007 08:17:22 PM
Thank you! and I will! I think I need to save up a little before I go buy it though. And Figure out how my kiln works and if it will get hot enough. (I'll ask the ceramics teacher ar school, he's awesome.)


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: hallecats on August 12, 2007 02:33:17 PM
Have you tried reading up on PMC?  There are some great books out there!  I love working with polymer clay and have an interest in PMC also.  The results look awesome.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Hippie9 on October 07, 2007 06:25:04 PM
This is a wonderful thread by the way....:-)



Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: dvinedesigns on December 11, 2007 06:59:50 AM
Hi. I just started working in PMC and love it. Im hooked. I will be going for my certification in STOCKTON NJ in April. Anyone else going?

There is a place in Pennington NJ I took my first class with. Its http://artfulbeadstudio.com/    check it out. Really nice bead store too.

Good luck to you. Enjoy it.



Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: princess evangeline on January 15, 2008 08:17:45 AM
QUICK QUESTION - I am looking to purchase the Firebox 8 Kiln by Skutt and was wondering if anyone has ever used this for firing PMC? I want to be able to fire PMC and use for glass fusing...... should work out for both, right?
Thanks!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: spurtiic on March 17, 2008 07:59:12 PM
Oh, man, I dunno...but I just looked at PMC stuff and I'm dying to try it now! Ahh... too. many. crafts. in. one. short. lifetime.  Help!


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Galena on December 07, 2008 03:50:25 AM
YAY! I've been ordered a beginners kit for Christmas. can't wait to have a go, it seems like such a great idea.

the kit comes with a torch, and a probably much needed instruction DVD. hehe.

and I'm sure I'll be in and out of here shouting HEEEEEEEEEEEEEELP! a lot. sorry guys  :D


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Galena on December 28, 2008 10:21:59 AM
told you I'd be back with questions.

do you reckon I could use one of these fingernail shaper/buffer machines to polish it up.

I mean, it can't be that harsh, it's for your nails.

http://www.boots.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10052&productId=121292&callingViewName=&langId=-1&catalogId=11051

just wondering. I'm more likely to use it if it's craft stuff than on my rather neglected nails.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: pixidance on January 21, 2009 12:10:10 PM
Are you talking about a dremel tool for nails?

I use metal burnishers to give my finished pieces a really good shine, and then I use a polishing cloth.  I don't see why a machine would be an issue, but you don't really want to scratch up the surface.  As long as what you're using is smooth and actually meant for polishing, I can't see an issue.

On the unfired pieces, I use an emery board and other sandpaper.  I wouldn't use a machine on the unfired pieces because they can be brittle and I wouldn't want to break them.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Gem_candy on January 21, 2009 12:22:36 PM
I'm going to go to a metal clay jewellery making beginners class.
I can't wait to learn. ;D


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Galena on January 29, 2009 11:09:52 AM
I've actually now found that I really enjoy hand burnishing with metal tools. lovely and shiny, and therapeautic.

I think I might still have a go on some plain pieces, just to see what effects I can come up with from it.


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: surfjewels on February 03, 2009 12:44:27 PM
I've been thinking about this recently too, its just the expence thats holding me back its about one pound for 1g.


The firing doesnt sound too bad, it sounds similar to fimo to work with?!

Hannah.



Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Miss Lisa on March 02, 2009 07:00:59 PM
I have a question about firing. I torch fire my pieces but they tend to curl up at the edges when I fire them this way. Would firing them in a kiln keep them flatter? I am working on convincing my hubby to get me one and this would be a point in a kilns favor! :)


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Galena on March 14, 2009 12:44:22 PM
mine tend to curl, then go flat again.

according to the DVD with the set, that was what to expect.

what are you firing it on? is it one of the blocks that reflects the heat back?

no expert myself, but this might be why. the reflected heat lets it fire evenly.

or something. hey, I don't know what I'm doing, I just play with it.   ;D


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: bead27 on March 27, 2009 03:01:11 AM
All the clay books I've read say that firing is better in a kiln but can be compelted with a hand torch. So I think Galenas post might be right perhaps the heat is too much (?).   The rule I always follow is that you should bring the object to a vibrant, glowing red color and hold it at this temperature for at least two minutes. Rather than look ing at a clock, I prefer to keep my attention focused on the glowing object and guess the time. Err on the side of caution, holding the heat until you are certain that a couple minutes have passed.

Has any one tried Art Clay they seam to advocate using a conventient cooker and even offer a cage to help - is it the same thing as PMC ?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Chibirinoa on April 08, 2009 06:55:17 AM
I'm looking into using PMC to make lacers for a costume I'd like to make. I need about 14 identical pieces that are roughly 1.5x1" and are able to withstand being laced up.

I plan on making one of the lacers out of polymer clay, apprx 12% larger than I need it to be, then making a silicone mold and casting them in the PMC+. Judging by the size of the lacers in the image, would a piece out of PMC be strong enough to function as lacing without the U part of the piece bending out of shape? Would PMC3 be a better choice?

Also, the pieces are fairly large, so would firing with a butane torch be the wrong way to go, since it would be tough to keep the heat even?




Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Hippie9 on June 24, 2009 11:15:14 PM
I have a question about using sea glass with the metal clay. I was told that the firing process would make the glass clear again....and I don't want that! Is there any way to set sea glass into metal clay?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: CraftyLittleLady on February 02, 2010 01:47:04 PM
yeah its always ncie to learn how to do this craft. where can you recommend people can get lessons about it effectively?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: Neurosylum on October 13, 2010 10:20:52 PM
Does anyone have any gold pieces they can share? I could look at these all day (because I can't afford any tools right now for PMC-ing :P).

EDIT:

By the way, if anyone sells their PMC works, how much do you usually sell them for?


Title: Re: Precious Metal Clay
Post by: robinred on November 26, 2010 12:08:56 PM
I took a class in this over the summer...made my own little silver piece! I'd love to get into it more, buuuut I'm also on a budget and kilns are expensive. Siiigh.

But here's the piece I did! Hand sculpted it...which is rather a pain.
Silver dragon necklace (https://www.craftster.org/pictures/showphoto.php?photo=409787)