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POTTERY, CERAMICS, POLYMER CLAY => Polymer Clay: Discussion and Questions => Topic started by: RamenSupernova on March 10, 2009 08:48:46 AM



Title: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: RamenSupernova on March 10, 2009 08:48:46 AM
So I have this book, which is printed in japanese:


In the book are large pictures of the completed objects and small pictures with japanese instructions of the steps to make them. In the step to make the frosting, it LOOKS like they take regular white CAULK and put it into a caulking gun, then squirt it into a piping bag with a star frosting tip and pipe it onto the baked piece from there and then decorate with sprinkles, little cookies, etc.

Also, these is this: http://www.strapya-world.com/products/30821.html (http://www.strapya-world.com/products/30821.html) which also looks like it could be caulk.

Not being the handiest person around the house, I've never used caulk before so I'm not sure if it would really look like that. I think you'd have to put a few layer of glaze or varnish on it.

What do you think? Have you ever heard of caulk being used with polymer clay like this?


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: Diane B. on March 10, 2009 11:14:57 AM
I don't know if the material in that link is actually caulking --or glossy caulking or thinned caulking or perhaps even "acrylic modeling paste" from the art or craft store -- but you could possibly try caulking from the hardware store if you don't want to use the more traditional materials that are used to make frostings for polymer clay. 
Caulking comes in various versions though and some might look or work better than others.

(I used spackling once to make a life-size fake cake, and though it worked really well I don't recommend it because it was brittle after drying and chipped or broke easily)

If you want to read about using various materials to make faux frosting for polymer clay--with or without icing tips-- check out these pages at my site:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/claygun.htm
(...click on Icing Tips, under Small & Medium Extruders)
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/miniatures.htm
(...click on Frostings, Icings, etc.)


HTH,

Diane B.


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: magicbeanbuyer on March 10, 2009 02:31:10 PM
I always thought they used some kind of silicon product for the icings.  I'm not sure though.


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: bhevarri on March 13, 2009 02:35:09 PM
I use 100% silicone caulk for my frosting thingys =)


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: Diane B. on March 14, 2009 09:21:33 AM
Unfortunately though, silicone caulks can't be cleaned up easily with water since they're not water-based (like acrylic caulks); they'll need something like paint thinner (don't know about "latex silicone" caulks).  So silicone caulks would be more work when extruding if not using disposable materials like paper cones, etc (i.e., when using metal or plastic icing tips, etc.).  For only spreading caulk though, various kinds of disposable tools would be easy to find or make.

Diane B.


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: bhevarri on March 16, 2009 12:36:23 AM
Yeah, I have a metal piping tip that I do my best to clean out (soap, hot water, shoving a paper towel into it, or a q-tip) but im sure that plastic disposable pastry tips would be MUCH better!


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: RamenSupernova on March 21, 2009 05:19:35 PM
Would silicone caulk be more durable than acrylic caulks?
Bhevarri, do you find the brittleness to be a problem in your frosting pieces?

Thanks to everyone for all of the help!


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: Diane B. on March 22, 2009 08:07:53 AM
Quote
Would silicone caulk be more durable than acrylic caulks?

Generally, silicone caulks are... just messier to use and clean-up than acrylics.

(I'd assume that the acrylic caulk would be strong enough for making things like this though unless they're getting lots of stress, but don't really know.) 

Diane B.


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: fairchildart on May 23, 2009 07:56:59 AM
The metal piping tips....are they made especially small for miniature work, or are they the metal tips used for decorating real life sized cakes?

lol sorry if this is a silly question (I'm thinking of Betsy Niederer's super tiny piping bags), but the end results are so beautiful I'd love to learn how to do it myself.


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: Diane B. on May 23, 2009 08:10:47 AM
Quote
The metal piping tips....are they made especially small for miniature work, or are they the metal tips used for decorating real life sized cakes?

As far as I know, they're all for decorating regular cakes but there may also be some equipment for miniaturists that I don't know about.  

There are other things that can be used to shape extrusions in various equipment though --e.g., dies in a clay gun (there are a lot of these you may not know about) or dies made by you for a clay gun, cookie presses, things that can be formed into cones and placed on an icing bag, things you can find or make then place into the tubes of various kinds for pressing through, even syringes for liquid polymer clay or highly-thinned solid clay.

You can make "bags" yourself too of various types, sizes.

You can read more about most of those things on this page, if you're interested:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/claygun.htm
...click on the sub-category Icing Tips

Were you looking for a particular size or shape you can't find?

Diane B.


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: fairchildart on May 23, 2009 10:07:16 AM

As far as I know, they're all for decorating regular cakes but there may also be some equipment for miniaturists that I don't know about. 

There are other things that can be used to shape extrusions in various equipment though --e.g., dies in a clay gun (there are a lot of these you may not know about) or dies made by you for a clay gun, cookie presses, things that can be formed into cones and placed on an icing bag, things you can find or make then place into the tubes of various kinds for pressing through, even syringes for liquid polymer clay or highly-thinned solid clay.

You can make "bags" yourself too of various types, sizes.

You can read more about most of those things on this page, if you're interested:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/claygun.htm
...click on the sub-category Icing Tips

Were you looking for a particular size or shape you can't find?

Diane B.

Thank you so much for your help!!

I'm really interested in how these meringues are made:

http://www.cdhm.org/user/lindac5204

They're so tiny!  It looks like you could make them using a piping bag but with what tip I have no clue O_O


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: Diane B. on May 23, 2009 10:47:27 AM
Quote
I'm really interested in how these meringues are made:
http://www.cdhm.org/user/lindac5204
They're so tiny!  It looks like you could make them using a piping bag but with what tip I have no clue

I think those are just made with an ordinary icing tip, though one with a tiny fluted-zigzag opening, pulling the tip straight up after extrusion.

If you can't find a purchased tip that's small enough though, you could make something yourself --especially for using with well-softened clay (or some other really soft material).  

One clayer made herself a tiny zigzag-pattern tip with a short section from one of the serrated metal strips that's glued to boxes of aluminum foil, plastic wrap, etc.  She formed it into a kind of cone as small as she wanted, then wrapped tape around it to hold it to the end of a plastic icing bag (flaring the bottom end of the tip a little to hold it in).  

You could try to make something similar with cuttable metal (even perhaps using stiff aluminum foil or layers of it), which you could then cut serrations of your choice into.
Or you could use another material like a sheet of transparency plastic or tape of some kind (transparent, packing, etc) to form a cone or tube, then cut serrations in it.

You might even be able to make a suitable serrated tip entirely from polymer clay (then bake it).

HTH,

Diane B.

 


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: fairchildart on May 24, 2009 07:24:59 AM
Ohh now that's definitely something I could try, thank you so much again!!  I'm very excited to try it out myself ^_^


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: kittymoon on June 16, 2009 07:25:15 AM
Quote
The metal piping tips....are they made especially small for miniature work, or are they the metal tips used for decorating real life sized cakes?

As far as I know, they're all for decorating regular cakes but there may also be some equipment for miniaturists that I don't know about.  

There are other things that can be used to shape extrusions in various equipment though --e.g., dies in a clay gun (there are a lot of these you may not know about) or dies made by you for a clay gun, cookie presses, things that can be formed into cones and placed on an icing bag, things you can find or make then place into the tubes of various kinds for pressing through, even syringes for liquid polymer clay or highly-thinned solid clay.

You can make "bags" yourself too of various types, sizes.

You can read more about most of those things on this page, if you're interested:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/claygun.htm
...click on the sub-category Icing Tips

Were you looking for a particular size or shape you can't find?

Diane B.

Hi Diane, your tips are really good but your website could do with some pictures. It's a bit hard to read through and it would be really nice to see some things in action. :) Thanks and have a good day  :D


Title: Re: Using caulk to make piped frosting?
Post by: Diane B. on June 16, 2009 11:02:31 AM
Quote
Hi Diane, your tips are really good but your website could do with some pictures. It's a bit hard to read through and it would be really nice to see some things in action.

kittymoon, I always hoped to be able to put photos at the site too, but that's a ginormous undertaking since there are more than 1800 pages of information there in 90 different categories.  That's why all the links are there though... they often go to relevant photos, etc.  (Unfortunately, since I can no longer wrangle the website 8-10 hours a day like I did for many years, I can't even remove or change the 1/3 of links that people have removed or moved at their sites, etc.  :'()
Glad you've found the tips good though, but just use the site in whatever way is worthwhile for you.

Diane B.