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MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS => Discussion and Questions => Topic started by: jenna rose on November 28, 2007 09:33:14 AM



Title: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: jenna rose on November 28, 2007 09:33:14 AM
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Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: SpottedFrog on November 28, 2007 06:25:41 PM
I actually have a Craftsman from Sears, but it's fully compatible with all Dremel brand bits & doodads. I've had it for more than ten years and acquired a lot of accesories in that time. I don't recall exactly which ones came with it originally but I did get it in a tool box type case with a pull out drawer for allllllll the extras : ) Mine is a variable speed type which I love.

My dad was given a Riobi tool of similar make- he hated it, it was rather wimpy.

If you intend on jewelry & will be doing metal work you want one with higher torqe & horsepower, cordless usually desn't have enough to drill silver. Besides, when working in a small area, like when you do jewelry, a cord isn't too much bother : ) Now getting into nooks on a chair, it can be cumbersome.

Hope that helps.


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: naturalcreation on December 19, 2007 03:06:24 AM
Dremel Multi-Pro with the flex-shaft and a slew of 40-grit cutters here. I love that thing, but it scares me. I'm afraid of flying debris or loose bits when that thing gets to over say 12000 rpm. Big wuss here :)
It works very well though! Highly recommended.


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: HSG on December 19, 2007 04:30:16 AM
The Dremel I have is the first one you listed.

I've used it for everything from cutting metal (computer case mods), to wood. It has not let me down once.

The only Dremel I don't recommend is the cordless. It's my understanding that they can sometimes let you down without enough power.

MMmmmmm....power tools!!! ;)


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: vinnie451 on December 22, 2007 01:29:26 AM
The only Dremel I don't recommend is the cordless. It's my understanding that they can sometimes let you down without enough power.

Definatley get something with a cord. Batterie life is crap and you have about half the power of a plug in model.

My hus band bought the newest biggest one he could find. Its Dremel brand and we have like ever accessory for it and use it for soooooo many things. I love the flex shaft attachment. It is easier to hold than the big main unit so it reduces fatigue if you are using it for long periods of time. It also helps you get into tight places if you need to.


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: balkandina on January 01, 2008 06:25:38 PM
So I just got a Dremel Multipro 2855-01 for Christmas and I'm at a complete loss...it doesn't have particularly user friendly instructions and I find the website confusing. Am I just Dremel impaired? I am very familiar with using full sizedpower drills and sanders, but this is making me feel very dumb. I mainly want to be able to drill and sand metal and wood and possibly etch glass. Any suggestions or guidance? What accoutrements should I get?


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: SpottedFrog on January 01, 2008 06:33:48 PM
I do a lot of trial & error :/ when I bought most of my bits I had a specific task in mind & bought accordingly...but now all those packages and labels are gone, so I fiddle around.

The sandpaper ones are pretty straight forward, they are sand paper equivalents.

The wire brush type ones I've only used once or twice, but you may have a lot of use for with metals :)

The rubbery bits I've never used successfully, or was trying to use them for the wrong thing.

The thin little disks that sorta seem ceramic are the dense cut off wheels, they are great on a lot of things but really brittle, that's why they sell them by the dozen.

Grab an assortment of materials & your goggles & go play :)


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: balkandina on January 01, 2008 06:56:53 PM
Thanks, Penlowe. My 13 year old daughter just figured it out for me ::) and I managed to find my way around the website. I guess I was just so excited at getting it that I let it intimidate me :P
Now I can't wait to dig under the snow for some of the tin and copper I left outside to age  ;)
Sorry for all the smileys, but I'm loving the New Year's hats they're wearing today ;D ;D


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: vinnie451 on January 02, 2008 02:36:42 AM
If you are working with metal I suggest not just goggles but long sleves and good gloves. Metal spliners are not fun and the peice you are working on can get supper hot from all the friction.

Also make sure you have the whole set of the silver peice that holds the bits. Drill bits are smaller and need a differant adapter than sand paper bits etc. If you don't already have you may also want to get a few good clampy things to hold your stuff steady and free you hands.


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: balkandina on January 02, 2008 05:51:57 PM
I tend to not use gloves in my metal work-I know, I know, you're supposed to, but I have a hard time controlling tin snips,etc...when I wear them. I have a high tolerance for pain, very little vanity about beat up hands and an up-to- date tetanus shot ;D
I was wondering if there are any super-secret ways people use to cool down the tool/metal from high friction?


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: SpottedFrog on January 02, 2008 06:48:13 PM
I had a really nice pair of work gloves that fit beautifully (and I have small hands), all leather and were tough. I got them at a farm & ranch supply, a little mom & pop type, in a very small town- wish I still had them! Someone actually stole them from me...  were fairly cheap too, under $15.


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: schtickl on January 06, 2008 10:21:49 PM
HEELLLLLLPPPP!!! lol IM FRUSTRATED!!

MY DILEMMA:    I have a stylus that i purchased a few days ago and am considering returning it. I have just recently heard that the corded ones have a LOT more power than the lithium ions and I want to drill into metals, resin, wood, glass, and really want to get into carving bone.

    I REALLY love how the stylus is made as far as the grip and precision/detail goes but i dont want to have a tool that, when i move onto tougher items such as rocks and bones and metal, wont have the torque to be useful.  I relaly dont know what to do - no one seems to be able to help me. I was thinking, since precision is a BIG issue for me, of getting a flex shaft but i really dont know how comparable it is and how comfortable it is. I would REALLY appreciate some imput - THANKS SO MUCH! ^.^


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: HSG on January 07, 2008 04:47:07 AM
If you have a cordless Dremel it will not have the power or torque to do the things you mention.

The one I have have came with the flex shaft, in addition to loads of attachment pieces. It was and is the best money I've spent on a power tool to date.

If you have in mind to really use the tool, and use it for the things you mentioned I would spend the money on the one Dremel that will do the job.

This is the one I have: http://www.dremel.com/en-us/tools/kit-detail.htm?H=188091&G=66981&I=69673&KI=66217


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: schtickl on January 07, 2008 10:17:51 AM
Thanks SO much!!! I really do appreciate the input! Is the flex shaft just as comfortable as a stylus?? I DEFINITLY need precision! Where can i get that kit from?


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: HSG on January 07, 2008 10:26:06 AM
The flex shaft is great for small detailed work. It is light weight and does not tax you hand or wrist.

The kit I got with my Dremel in one package, but I expect any Lowe's or home improvement place would also have something similar.

However, getting the attachments that suit your needs are probably just as cost effective as the whole case. Then you don't have extras sitting around unused.

Glad I could help. :)


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: schtickl on January 07, 2008 04:44:59 PM
Thanks! *sigh* i guess im back to Lowe's :S
So which is better - the 400 kit w/ flex OR the 400 alone + just the pieces i need? + flex shaft?


and where can i get the best prices? Lowe's prices are pretty normal but id like to get the best deal possible.


Title: Re: Choosing a Dremel - what do you have?
Post by: HSG on January 07, 2008 06:09:48 PM
Think you get the better deal with the whole package since that is what you need. Most likely you can catch a sale this time of year, too.