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Topic: Hand-dyed silk scarf-Now with tutorial!!  (Read 4925 times)
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706Designs
"To live a creative life, we must lose our fear of being wrong" -Joseph Chilton Pearce
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« on: July 25, 2004 10:26:33 AM »

Hello.  I recently learned how to dye silk scarves using natural elements.  My first scarf (shown here) was dyed using red cabbage, poppies, iris, cranberries, wine, and salts.

The first picture is the scarf stewing...I let it sit for about 2 weeks



Here is a picture of the scarf after its been washed



I finally had an occasion to wear it to last night.  Yeah!

Tutorial:
Crumble up or fold Habotai silk scarf.  It doesn't really matter how you lay it out, play with it and have fun.

Scatter organic ingredients on the scarf.  I used cranberries, purple cabbage, poppy leaves, and black geranium.  You can use any plant material that you'd like.  If you aren't sure of the colors, think of what they look like when dried.  A white or light color plant is generally not a good choice.

Lightly spritz your scarf with balsamic vinegar or red wine.  You don't need very much.  Just make it lightly damp. You don't need as much liquid as you might think. If you are using wet materials, such as cranberries, you will need less.

Sprinkle a pinch of salt and a pinch of Allum (can be found in the spice area of a grocery store) onto the scarf.

Bunch up the scarf and put into a baggie. Seal.  If you'd like, wack it with a hammer a couple of times to release the juices.   If baggie breaks, don't worry, leave it in the broken baggie and put it into another.

Wrap rubber bands around the baggie.  Put the baggie in a sunny spot, like a window or outside.  If you put it outside, make sure you place the baggie in a jar, otherwise wild animals might eat it!

Now here is the hard part, let it sit for as long as possible!!  The longer it sits, the stronger the color will be.  I waited about 2 weeks.  You can open up the package if you want to peak and check the moistness.

When you are ready, open up the package outside and shake.  Yes, it will be a bit stinky, but its worth it!

Hand wash with gentle detergent and hang to dry.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2011 06:43:18 PM by Belladune - Reason: to add tutorial to first post » THIS ROCKS   Logged
dani24
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« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2004 10:36:22 AM »

That's really neat.   Grin  How exactly do you do that?  You said you let it sit for two weeks?  Do you put it in the fridge?  Is there any risk of the food elements becoming rancid/moldy/spoiled?  I'd hate to pull out the scarf and have it smell ike mold.   Sad  But, I'm assuming there's a way around this.  Post a tutorial!
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shanola2789
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« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2004 11:14:56 AM »

Wow I really like that.. I have a new thing for scarves and if I could make my own that'd be wonderful.  Where'd you get the silk scarf?
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Goddess
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2004 11:18:26 AM »

that is lovely. what color was the scarf before you dyed it?
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i_have_a_knack
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« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2004 02:29:53 PM »

absolutely beautiful! I love and collect silk scarves. I have never seen one done with vegetable dyes. Do you know how they would respond to resist?
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706Designs
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« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2004 06:52:40 PM »

Thank-you so much for all of the kind comments.  Actually I took 2 hr class from a professor at a nearby university.  She gave us white silk scarfs (I'll get back to you on the actual type of silk).  She buys hers online at orientalsilks.com, I believe.  Too bad there is a $100 minimum order.  I'm sure there are other places online where you can purchase a smaller order.  I will have to "dig up" the tutorial.  I'll post it as soon as I find it.

Dani24, to answer  your questions.  Its better to put the scarf in a sunny location.  If it is put outside, it should be placed in a sealed container, so animals won't get into it.  Yes, it was stinky when I opened up the package.  Obviously, I shook it outside.  Don't worry too much about the mold.  The combination of the wine/vinegar and salts help keep the mold away.

Our instructor sells scarves such as these for $75-95 apiece.  Her work is absolutely beautiful!!!  She said that the longer you can wait to open up the scarf, the better it will turn out.  Some people let the scarf stew for months, even up to a year.  I can't wait that long!

i have a knack- I'm not familiar w/resist, although I feel I should be.  Could you provide more information?
« Last Edit: July 26, 2004 06:55:06 PM by 706Designs » THIS ROCKS   Logged
yogamomma
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2004 07:09:19 PM »

You can buy silk scarf blanks from Dharma Trading Company.  Their prices seem very reasonable and I don't believe there is any minimum purchase requirement.

http://www.dharmatrading.com/

You can also dye silk with Kool-Aid.

Rebecca

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706Designs
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« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2004 08:00:49 PM »

I just remembered that you use Habotai.  She stated that other types of silk doesn't hold up as well.

Have you dyed scarves w/Kool aid, yogamomma?  Does it hold up well?
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verbminx
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2004 01:21:16 AM »

Some art supply stores will also sell single white silk scarves packaged to be handpainted or dyed. I don't remember which craft company was doing this, but I've seen it. The scarves came in a couple of different sizes and were marketed with a line of either paints or dyes to decorate them with. It wasn't at a mainstream place like Michaels or JoAnn, but the Michaels in the town I lived in when I saw it was small, and I haven't really looked for it at JoAnn. The place I saw it was kind of like an indie Blick, but the company actually marketing them was one that most craftsters would recognize. (If I could remember it.)  Huh

Anyway, my point is, look around, you may not need to do a special order.
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706Designs
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« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2004 08:32:35 PM »

It appears that I have misplaced the actual directions.  I'm pretty sure I remember all the steps.

Crumble up or fold Habotai silk scarf.  It doesn't really matter how you lay it out, play with it and have fun.

Scatter organic ingredients on the scarf.  I used cranberries, purple cabbage, poppy leaves, and black geranium.  You can use any plant material that you'd like.  If you aren't sure of the colors, think of what they look like when dried.  A white or light color plant is generally not a good choice.

Lightly spritz your scarf with balsamic vinegar or red wine.  You don't need very much.  Just make it lightly damp. You don't need as much liquid as you might think. If you are using wet materials, such as cranberries, you will need less.

Sprinkle a pinch of salt and a pinch of Allum (can be found in the spice area of a grocery store) onto the scarf.

Bunch up the scarf and put into a baggie. Seal.  If you'd like, wack it with a hammer a couple of times to release the juices.   If baggie breaks, don't worry, leave it in the broken baggie and put it into another.

Wrap rubber bands around the baggie.  Put the baggie in a sunny spot, like a window or outside.  If you put it outside, make sure you place the baggie in a jar, otherwise wild animals might eat it!

Now here is the hard part, let it sit for as long as possible!!  The longer it sits, the stronger the color will be.  I waited about 2 weeks.  You can open up the package if you want to peak and check the moistness.

When you are ready, open up the package outside and shake.  Yes, it will be a bit stinky, but its worth it!

Hand wash with gentle detergent and hang to dry.


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