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Topic: tips for sewing tshirt material?  (Read 2220 times)
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gwenluvy
« on: May 30, 2006 01:17:29 PM »

is it called jersey or is that something else entirely? do I use a straight or zigzag stitch? do i need anything special, like a particular thread. needle, or foot? how do i know what tension to use and if it's too high/low?

I'm sorry about all the questions but I'm totally clueless and I need to sew like mad.
I used to work in promotions at a local venue and i have probably 30 too big tees from all the shows there (atreyu, calico system, punchline, emery, hellogoodbye, hopesfall, etc... i don't necessarily like all those bands but they had cute merch, haha) that are in desperate need of reconstruction.  Also, all my favorite tees need fake "layered" bottoms bc they all show my belly and now that i've had a baby and am covered with stretch marks, I have the good sense to know that it's not cute anymore Tongue

I don't need patterns but rather just instructions/tips/tricks... I know there's gotta be something different with stretchy material, i just want to avoid ruining my neat shirts in the process of figuring it out.

thanks in advance!
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« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2006 01:21:40 PM »

walking foot
stretch needle
poly/cotton thread

and my favorite:

STARCH.

not the spray kind, the liquid kind.  use it liberally and often.
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« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2006 02:34:49 PM »

Rostitchery..you have a magic box full of tips.. Cheesy
Starch?!!
Oy vey! I had no idea you can use that. How do you use? Do you wash the piece? Can you use our regular "pantry starch?
Do you mind telling the hows to?
Thank you
Perach
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« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2006 04:06:23 PM »

that's right, i just make my own using ordinary cornstarch.

i start a pot of water to boil, and while that is heating up i whisk some cornstarch into some ice cold water.  when the pot is boiling, i whisk the cold water/cornstarch mixture into the boiling water, and keep whisking until the mix clarifies. 

i use this mix directly in the rinse cycle of the washing machine, but i air-dry the fabric because that makes it stiffer.

you can also dilute this and put it in a spray bottle, or you can even dip your piece in it.  i have sometimes painted it on just the edge of some fabric when i needed to make a hem.

and you can use it to paste stuff to the wall--i put fabric on my walls in london using starch and it stayed up until i left almost 6 years later.  all i had to do was pull the fabric down and wash the walls--just like new!
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« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2006 02:02:53 PM »

Omg that sticking to the walls thing sounds so neat. I'll hae to keep it in mind and see if I can do that to my dorm in a year.
Yeah, I don't really have any tips.
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britknit
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2006 02:20:48 PM »

Rostichery is that like cornstarch as in cornflour?

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low_budget_diva
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2006 02:34:29 PM »

Rostichery is that like cornstarch as in cornflour?


Corn starch is a thickening agent you might keep on hand for making pies, for example, when you need to thicken up the fruit mixture so it doesn't get so runny that the pie crust is a soggy mess. I think the same principle is being applied for fabric--the softness of the jersey is being kept in check by the starch.

Just make sure that what you are using isn't corn meal, which looks like flour and is used for making cornbread and such.
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katie_ramone9
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2006 02:51:04 PM »

if its t-shirt-like material then its either knit or jersey. my sewing teacher just told me that when sewing a strech material like knit or jersey you should strech the material out as it goes through the machine that way when you go to put the item on and as you strech it to put your arms through and whatnot the thread doesnt snap. and a zig zag stich would strech with the material.  there are special needles to use when working with knit and on the backs of the packs of machine needles it usually has the needles color coded as to what theyre used for. and if you have a serger you could do the four thread mock safety stich and that streches. if you dont have a serger then ignore that last sentence.  but i would highly reccomend a serger. you can get them for around as much as a sewing machine. i bought mine refurbished for $150.
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« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2006 03:15:03 PM »

I thought if you stretch the material the edge will look like a lettuce leaf. So, don't stretch it, but don't bunch it, I guess.
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britknit
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2006 04:26:46 PM »

Rostichery is that like cornstarch as in cornflour?


Corn starch is a thickening agent you might keep on hand for making pies, for example, when you need to thicken up the fruit mixture so it doesn't get so runny that the pie crust is a soggy mess. I think the same principle is being applied for fabric--the softness of the jersey is being kept in check by the starch.

Just make sure that what you are using isn't corn meal, which looks like flour and is used for making cornbread and such.

Yup that sounds like what we UK-ers call cornflour...cool thanks!
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