A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: When you post a project, remember that you can always click the Modify button to edit the post and add additional information.
Total Members: 297,467
Currently Running With Scissors:
480 Guests and 19 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1]
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Antiquing/oxidizing *gold* colored, plated, etc findings  (Read 954 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
FerretNose
Offline Offline

Posts: 267
Joined: 04-Oct-2004

Shine on, you crazy diamond...


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« on: April 23, 2006 12:51:47 PM »

I am completely stuck on a jewelry project- I need wire or headpins that are antique gold, dark gold colored, not bright gold. Does anyone know of a way to oxidize bright gold wire or headpins, such as those you get at walmart or hobby lobby? I have tried wiping and soaking them in polish remover. I have tried holding them in a flame, then wiping off the char. It either completely takes off the gold, turing it black, or does nothing at all. I know there are oxidizing solutions out there, but they work only on brass and silver. And i can't find any readymade antique gold colored headpins or wire- not even at Fire Mountain.

Bright gold would look ridiculous on my project. So, if you know of a way to do this, or even a place that sells what I'm looking for, I'd be much obliged if you could tell me. Thanks!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

I wanna trade ATC's!

My Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ferretnose/
TimelessBarbara
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2008 02:23:16 PM »

I am completely stuck on a jewelry project- I need wire or headpins that are antique gold, dark gold colored, not bright gold. Does anyone know of a way to oxidize bright gold wire or headpins, such as those you get at walmart or hobby lobby? I have tried wiping and soaking them in polish remover. I have tried holding them in a flame, then wiping off the char. It either completely takes off the gold, turing it black, or does nothing at all. I know there are oxidizing solutions out there, but they work only on brass and silver. And i can't find any readymade antique gold colored headpins or wire- not even at Fire Mountain.

Bright gold would look ridiculous on my project. So, if you know of a way to do this, or even a place that sells what I'm looking for, I'd be much obliged if you could tell me. Thanks!

I came here looking for this info, too, for silvery tone, I want a antique looking old silver not that shiny new silver...anyone HELP???
THIS ROCKS   Logged
High Strung
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2008 03:43:58 PM »

Ferret,

Have you tried looking under antique brass?  I was able to find antique brass (gold-toned) at Joann.  I'm not sure if Wal-mart has them, but the chains like Michael's, Joann and Hobby Lobby do.

Hope this helps =)
THIS ROCKS   Logged

High Strung Design Etsy
High Strung Design ArtFire (testing)

"Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success. If you love what you are doing, you will be successful - Albert Schweitze
Bionic Dingo
Cunning Artificer
Offline Offline

Posts: 299
Joined: 13-Jul-2007


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2008 10:31:32 PM »

Ferret: Look for brass, it's probably your best bet. Gold doesn't really tarnish, that's one of the reasons it's popular for jewellery.

Timeless: any idea what the metal is? Is it sterling silver plate or something diffirent?
THIS ROCKS   Logged

<< I'm on Etsy!  www.magpiehouse.etsy.com >>
TimelessBarbara
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2008 02:39:08 PM »

Ferret: Look for brass, it's probably your best bet. Gold doesn't really tarnish, that's one of the reasons it's popular for jewellery.

Timeless: any idea what the metal is? Is it sterling silver plate or something diffirent?

It is cheapo Michael's "buy by the yard" silver tone chain?
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Bionic Dingo
Cunning Artificer
Offline Offline

Posts: 299
Joined: 13-Jul-2007


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2008 08:35:38 PM »

Natch. Could be tricky. I got no idea what they coat that stuff with.

hmm. well, I know for silver and nickle the yolks of a couple of hard-boiled eggs in a plastic bag with it can do the trick. (Takes a few days, though) So maybe try that?
THIS ROCKS   Logged

<< I'm on Etsy!  www.magpiehouse.etsy.com >>
Tamarama
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2008 03:44:11 PM »

I agree, brass or antique brass headpins would work best.  If you're really in a pinch you might want to try this:

It may not be super permanent but it's an old trick that works pretty well.  I definitely wouldn't use this on real silver or gold.  Wink 

To antique 'silver', I use black oil paint.  To antique 'gold' components, you might try dark brown oil paint, like burnt umber. 

Take an old artist's paint brush that you want to trash anyway and give your metal pieces a thin coating of paint. Just kind of 'pounce' it on with a brush that has a minimal amount of paint on it, like you are stencilling.  Really get the paint down into any crevices.  You want it to look darker than your final result.
 

Let it dry until it is mostly dry but still a little bit tacky, at least several hours or so.  Wipe off the surface gently with a soft cloth until it looks the way you want. 

It's easier to do the individal components before you put your jewelry together.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2008 04:47:30 PM by Tamarama » THIS ROCKS   Logged
TimelessBarbara
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2008 03:28:37 AM »

I agree, brass or antique brass headpins would work best.  If you're really in a pinch you might want to try this:

It may not be super permanent but it's an old trick that works pretty well.  I definitely wouldn't use this on real silver or gold.  Wink 

To antique 'silver', I use black oil paint.  To antique 'gold' components, you might try dark brown oil paint, like burnt umber. 

Take an old artist's paint brush that you want to trash anyway and give your metal pieces a thin coating of paint. Just kind of 'pounce' it on with a brush that has a minimal amount of paint on it, like you are stencilling.  Really get the paint down into any crevices.  You want it to look darker than your final result.
 

Let it dry until it is mostly dry but still a little bit tacky, at least several hours or so.  Wipe off the surface gently with a soft cloth until it looks the way you want. 

It's easier to do the individal components before you put your jewelry together.
Excellent idea, thank you!
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
How to Crochet a Beanie Hat Part 17/26
How to Crochet a Beanie Hat Part 21/26
How to Crochet a Beanie Hat Part 26/26
How to Crochet a Beanie Hat Part 1/26
How to Crochet a Beanie Hat Part 10/26
Latest Blog Articles
Tute Tuesday: Sandwich Wrap
Falling Leaves
Meatless Monday: Provencal Inspired Quiche

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.