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Topic: Old Rusty Horse Shoe-basic tut  (Read 2423 times)
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barbwire
« on: March 23, 2006 11:59:02 AM »

When we were in Italy, there were these chocolate shops that had all kinds of very real looking rusty tools molded in chocolate.  I bought a horse shoe for my daughter.  I had to come up with something for a fund raiser for a horse club she is in, so I copied the horse shoe.  I didn't think it would be too hard.

Here is the original shoe (from my horse Spiffy) and the mold I made.  To prepare the shoe I scrubbed it with a brush, put it in the dishwasher and sealed it with clear acrylic spray.  I brushed it with flour before I pushed it in the clay.  The mold was made from the Sculpy clay that stays bendy when it is done.  I pushed the shoe into the clay, the white clay I added in because the bottom wasn't quite right, next time I wouldn't add any because it made a ridge, but wasn't bad in the final result so I left it alone, not knowing how many times I could use the mold anyway.  The mold was too thick & stiff at first so I took the trusty exacto knife and whittled it away so it was softer than the chocolate.  Th first shoe broke coming out, so the mold needs to be thin.  

All the stuff I used, melted chips, the dark looks better but the milk will get sold.  It takes 1/3 cup chips in the microwave 1:20 to melt.  Brush some cocoa (unsweetened) in the mold so the chocolate releases.  Drop melted chips in the mold then refridgerate until the chocolate is completely dull.  I use the tip of a dull knife to push all the way around the mold to release it from the shoe, peel it out, brush again with cocoa and you have a rusty shoe!



real rusty shoe

So far the mold has made about 10 shoes and is starting to crack a little, it doesn't affect the look and has made it easier to remove, but I am sure it won't last a heck of a lot longer.


Barbara
« Last Edit: June 29, 2010 11:02:13 AM by jungrrl - Reason: fixed picture(s) » THIS ROCKS   Logged
javastain
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« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2006 12:10:21 PM »

That is SWEET!!! Pun intended! I love it! I can't wait to figure out how I can do a mold of something and make it fit the sitation so well (horse shoe for the horse event)... Thanks for sharing!
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I'd love to send you some hand spun for a poppet!

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Ezri_B
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2006 12:47:48 PM »

Is sculpy food safe?  I have been looking for a medium to use to make candy molds, but I haven't been able to find some that are food safe.

Your horse-shoes look awesome!
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barbwire
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2006 12:55:07 PM »

Is sculpy food safe?  I have been looking for a medium to use to make candy molds, but I haven't been able to find some that are food safe.

Your horse-shoes look awesome!

Well, the pacage says non-toxic and had no warnings in anything I looked up about it.  The chocolate is not hot enough to melt it. 

B
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Diane B.
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« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2006 04:19:59 PM »

Properly cured polymer clay is probably safe for food, but in general polymer clayers try to avoid using clay when it will be in contact with food. Dogs seem to love it and eat it all the time =technicolor poop, but mostly it seems to be a lifetime load thing like so many other things these days.
You can read much more about all that on this page if you're interested:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/safety_health_cleaning.htm
(...click on "Plasticizers, etc."...)

However, if you want to make a really good mold for food, which will last practically forever (and be flexible and not generally not require a release, to boot), check out 2-pt silicone molding materials.  

There are a number of brands, and they can vary somewhat in characteristics, degree of heat resistance --though they're all higher than you'd need-- absolute smoothness, color, and cost.  But most should be fine for what you want.

You'd just need enough that when mixed it would fit around the horse shoe as you've done with the clay above... silicone is more expensive, but not too bad if you want to make a lot of casts from the same mold, and it makes a great, detailed, flexible. mold.  
There's lots of info on these molds on this page at my site, including 2-pt silicone ones (and polymer clay ones):
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/molds.htm
(Making Molds Yourself > Silicone > brands)
(and btw, one brand in particular calls itself "food safe," but I believe they're all more or less food safe)



Diane B.

If you want an all-polymer clay board here at craftster, vote here!
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=72141.msg813624#msg813624
« Last Edit: June 29, 2010 11:03:19 AM by jungrrl » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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kacarrol
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2006 09:17:28 PM »

I don't know if you have seen the show but I used to be a religious follower of Art Attack, it was an art show that played for about 20 minutes each day.

Once on that show they made chocolate hands, they used almond paste (you can get it at bulk food stores) as the mold material. It is perfectly food safe and soft enough not to break the chocolate, you may have to remold each time though.

Hope that helps.
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Ezri_B
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2006 05:06:24 AM »

Thank you Diane B. I will have to look into using silicone, thanks for all the info though.

Thank you also kacarrol. I think most of the things I am interested in doing would be more multiple items, however, for birthdays and such the almond paste thing might be just what I would need. Thanks alot!
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radal16
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2006 07:59:35 AM »

Your chocolate horse-shoes are great, I would eat one!  Hope it works out with the silicone.  If it does, I might have to try it- I know a few farriers who might like one...
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moondeela
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« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2006 08:27:48 AM »

barbwire - you ROCK! 

I see that you are in the AK - where are you selling these fabulous chocolate shoes??  I need a dozen or so.  Smiley
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Diane B.
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« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2006 09:19:59 AM »

Here's another one from my site (some has to do with liquid clay, but the techniques are also used for liquid chocolate):


(making a mold for liquid clay with flour is similar to) a technique used by some chocolatiers

(lesson):
-- place flour (reg. baking flour) in a shallow pan (or box lid?), (I used small, aluminum pie tins).
--GENTLY pack it down with a flat bottomed glass or another flat object
(--make an impression with something)
--carefully fill the impression with a squeeze bottle full of TLS (or liquid chocolate).... you have much more control of the flow and it is less likely to disturb the impression
--bake liquid clay (at 300 degrees)
-- After baking, remove the object ... wash, sand, and finish. Jan R.

I completely filled the impression (probably a range from 1/8" to 1/2") It depends on the object I use to make the impression..but you can end up with items you can use as pins, pendants etc..
... To do this, I started out with plain liquid clayand used the back of a measuring spoon to make the impressions. The results was a perfect cabochon shape.
....I next used a brass charm, rubber stamp and various objects..with perfect results!

Some of the other experiments were as follows (could also be done in any mold):
-- lightly sprinkle PearlEX into the impression, then add a small amount of TLS, more Pearl Ex and more TLS..and bake
--Add tiny, holeless glass beads (beadz) to the tls and fill the impression (see Mixing Media > Seed Beads, etc.)
--Use various colors of TLS (colored with Pearl Ex etc) and mix tiny drops with the plain TLS for a gorgeous opal effect.
--Add tiny flecks of (metallic) leaf.
--I made an impression using a Kokopelli pendant, then used a toothpick and added tiny amounts of acrylic paint to the TLS that was already in the impression..and VERY gently swirled it... lovely marble effect!

....It's really very simple..and the only thing I'd suggest is to be careful when moving the pan to the oven. The flour is much more stable than you might think..but care is needed so you don't disturb the mix.

....The flour can be reused ..though some of it clumped a bit..so I just tossed it out.
 
(...Btw...the same thing can be done using tempered chocolate. You can use flour or cocoa powder to make the impression...and eat the results! ) Jan R.




Diane B.

If you want an all-polymer clay board here at craftster, vote here!
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=72141.msg813624#msg813624



« Last Edit: June 29, 2010 11:03:44 AM by jungrrl » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
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