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Topic: Project Runway Dress  (Read 32819 times)
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Lil Red Riding Hood
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« Reply #40 on: March 29, 2006 07:10:48 AM »

Has anyone ordered any rayon jersey from a store online that can attest to its softness/slinkyness? I can't find any suitable fabric at JoAnns, and that's the only place around here to even look for it. Online is almost my only option right now, but I am always hesitant to order something that I haven't been able to touch IRL.
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shellybean
« Reply #41 on: March 29, 2006 07:18:50 AM »

Having gotten my jersey from Hancock fabrics, I can attest that the stuff they are selling online is probably the same as in the store and it feels fine to me. Its not especially silky, b/c it is kinda matte, but I think that it will be very comfortable to wear. I will say that the colors shown online look better in person. They also have some interlocked polyester that I considered for the dress that has more color choices that feels pretty good.
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annangela
« Reply #42 on: March 29, 2006 11:29:56 AM »

huh. so after staring some more (i need a more productive hobby :/), i still can't figure out the edging.

could it be possible that she sewed the edging underneath the darker fabric, so the stitch is on the darker color and therefore less noticible? i'm so stumped, and i'm sure it's such an easy answer that i'll be kicking myself later.
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sera_tonin
« Reply #43 on: March 30, 2006 09:18:05 PM »

I drafted my own version of this dress (camera battery's dead so I'm afraid I can't post a picture) last week, so maybe I can help with some questions.

The dress has kimono sleeves which are similar to dolman/batwing sleeve but a bit tighter. It's fairly easy to morph a cap sleeve to a kimono sleeve if you already have a pattern, but want your dress to look exactly like Kara's version. 

The ties for the waist are sewn in the side seams so you'd really want to use a light weight material so as not to create an unsightly bulge.

The "edging" is actually just bands of fabric. Although you could bind the edges by folding the fabric over, it's really not necessary and probably would be more trouble than it's worth. Say you want three inches of the contrast fabric to show: cut a 6 inch wide piece (however long you need to go around the neck and edges of the dress) and fold it in half (wrong sides together). Sew the contrast fabric to the dress with right sides together and raw edges together. When the bands are that wide there's no danger of the raw edges showing, even when I wear the dress open like a robe.

I hope this helps and isn't too confusing.
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kitschycoup
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« Reply #44 on: March 31, 2006 05:22:53 AM »


The "edging" is actually just bands of fabric. Although you could bind the edges by folding the fabric over, it's really not necessary and probably would be more trouble than it's worth. Say you want three inches of the contrast fabric to show: cut a 6 inch wide piece (however long you need to go around the neck and edges of the dress) and fold it in half (wrong sides together). Sew the contrast fabric to the dress with right sides together and raw edges together. When the bands are that wide there's no danger of the raw edges showing, even when I wear the dress open like a robe.

I hope this helps and isn't too confusing.

I _ think_ I know the way you are talking about and I have tried it (pinned) and it just seems like the edging does not lie flat. Or at least not as flat as it appears to lie on the Kara dress. If you could diagram the method you used that would be cool! Any help is really appreciated. Believe me.
I am trying to be super careful with my material on this one because I LOVE the texture / colors / and cheepo$ I paid for it, but I got it at Hell-Mart on the bargain table and there is no way I can get more if I mess up. (THAT is the only drawback to being a remnant whore)
Regarding the fabric buying online - I would imagine that if you _had_ to because you lived in an area with crummy fabric stores, the best defense would be to use the care tags in garments you have at home and use the fabric content on something that is like what you want as your guide. The fabric stores in my area bite it big time, but so far I have been pretty lucky as far as finding something that is ok for whatever project I am working on.
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jaded
« Reply #45 on: March 31, 2006 03:42:29 PM »

First of all, don't underestimate the power of industrial construction and pressing equipment for making things look a certain way.  Surely we've all tried to iron an edge or fold on a resistant fabric and had the edge be less than crisp.  Also remember the manufacturer has access to just the right fabric, eg. one that lends itself to crisp edges. 

Also, the way you tried it might in fact work perfectly, it's just that you need to actually sew it (and iron the crap out of it) vs. only having pinned it.


But in more in the vein of a solution - if you've got thread that matches the main fabric really nicely, I would suggest sewing on the bands the easy way (the doubled band) and then topstitching along the whole thing on the dress side of the seam, through all the layers, including the seam allowance.  If the thread is a good match and you follow the line really closely, it should be barely visible, and will hold the fabric in the right direction.  Then iron, iron, iron [cautiously].

Or, a similar but alternate method that may or may not help, but I thought I'd ramble on - you can set it up like bias tape,
1. Iron your center fold along the band, with the under side of the band a tiny bit deeper than the front.
2. Stitch the front of the band to the front of the dress
3. Fold band away from body and iron seam as flat as you can, iron seam allowance of underside inwards (wrong sides together)
4. Fold over underside, edge should just overlap first seam
5. Stitch, on right side, just a hair over from the first seam so that stitching line is hidden in the seam.
6. Iron, iron, iron.


And the sleeves shouldn't be too hard, just angle them out around 45 degrees or something (use a long sleeved shirt as a guide) rather than straight out, so you don't get too much bunching when your arm is down and stretching when your arm is out.  I'm too lazy to read the whole thread properly, so I'm just going to assume your fabric is stretchy enough.


Hope some of that was helpful.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2006 03:44:26 PM by jaded » THIS ROCKS   Logged
kitschycoup
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« Reply #46 on: March 31, 2006 06:25:49 PM »

I am laughing my butt off about "Iron the crap out of it". and I do not think anyone who advocates so much ironing could ever be called "lazy".  Wink
That does make sense though. I will print out these tips and keep it on the table to pick up when I start again. Thanks!
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"Being cool is not a competition - It's a cause!!" ~ me

The universe is shaped exactly like the earth. If you go straight long enough you'll end up where you were.
jaded
« Reply #47 on: March 31, 2006 06:51:08 PM »

Happy to have amused you : )

I'm only an advocate or ironing because I know what a difference it can make, not because I always follow my own advice : P  There's a lot of quiet grumbling involved whenever I have to stop sewing to iron a seam, ha ha.

Look forward to seeing how your dress turns out, good luck.
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sera_tonin
« Reply #48 on: March 31, 2006 08:51:22 PM »


The "edging" is actually just bands of fabric. Although you could bind the edges by folding the fabric over, it's really not necessary and probably would be more trouble than it's worth. Say you want three inches of the contrast fabric to show: cut a 6 inch wide piece (however long you need to go around the neck and edges of the dress) and fold it in half (wrong sides together). Sew the contrast fabric to the dress with right sides together and raw edges together. When the bands are that wide there's no danger of the raw edges showing, even when I wear the dress open like a robe.

I hope this helps and isn't too confusing.

I _ think_ I know the way you are talking about and I have tried it (pinned) and it just seems like the edging does not lie flat. Or at least not as flat as it appears to lie on the Kara dress. If you could diagram the method you used that would be cool! Any help is really appreciated. Believe me.


I guess I left out an important step: whether you decide to bind the contrast fabric or just sew it right on, the part that goes around the back of your neck must be curved. You can cut the bands to fit the curve or cut a separate curved piece to go around the back of the neck (this would give you more control but would also create two more seams). If you do that the rest of the dress should lie flat, although it couldn't hurt to stretch the bands a wee bit as you sew them to the dress. If you don't want to sacrifice your fabric just yet, try pinning the binding on and then pinning out darts at the shoulder seams and back of the neck to see how it looks on you.   
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skye691
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« Reply #49 on: April 08, 2006 10:32:06 PM »

Have you guys seen Vogue 7820? It's VERY similar to that dress..

Here's a link http://store.sewingtoday.com/cgi-bin/voguepatterns/shop.cgi?s.item.V7820=x&TI=20002&page=6

It's not a true wrap... but you could sure as hell modify it to make it look like one.
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