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Topic: crochet hook descriptions??  (Read 1062 times)
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crafty mama
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« on: February 16, 2006 12:22:25 PM »

The company that I work for (www.soysilk.com) has a line of knitting needles and crochet hooks. I'm primarily a knitter, still found it hard to describe the degree of pointiness on the needles. But I managed to get through it. However, when I got to the crochet hooks I was pretty much at a loss. I found this chart of crochet hook terms  - http://crochet.org/hook/hooktype.html 

But that is about as far as I got. Most online stores describe their hooks by color and not much else. So, how do you guys describe your hooks? What do you look for in a hook? What quality is especially wonderful (besides color)? Thanks.
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hooklady
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2006 03:09:38 AM »

I would look for the shape of the hook ,the length of the shank and material. Some people like an inline hook, short shank hook like this http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c259/hooklady/Bates2402388.jpg . These are sold by Coats & Clark under the name of Susan Bates, Red Heart or Lion Brand. These are aluminum and plastic (for yarn) and steelite (for thread). They also make a silicon coated hook sold under the name Susan Bates Quicksilver.

The other predominant hook shape is sold by Wright's under the name Boye http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c259/hooklady/Boye2635444.jpg. These have a long shank. They are also made in aluminum and steel. The plastic ones they make are sold as Boye Baleen hooks which simulates bone (these are my personal favorites for yarn). Another company Clover also sells hooks with similar head shape.

Then there's wood and bamboo. Manufactured and hand carved... So... I could go on and on.

What I would suggest is that you buy an individual hook of each type and try it. It should fit comfortably in your hand and the movement to make the stitches should be smooth. Also when you get your hook be sure to prepare it for use by washing it (not the wood or bamboo) dry it throughly and wax it with bees wax or a rub with a piece of wax paper. (you should do this anytime you find your hook pulling or draggin the yarn). This will keep the hook from splitting the yarn. Once you find a hook you like then you can go on from there to get others.

I find that different hooks work better with differnent yarns. I could go on forever ... I collect hooks and have at least one by every maker I can find so if you have one in mind and would like a picture or more information on the hook before you buy let me know and I can provide you with pictures and descriptions. Feel free to email me at efwatso@yahoo.com.

Good look with your search for the perfect hook.

Hooklady




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loisgriffinwannabe
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« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2006 03:36:36 AM »

The company that I work for (www.soysilk.com) has a line of knitting needles and crochet hooks. I'm primarily a knitter, still found it hard to describe the degree of pointiness on the needles. But I managed to get through it.

When will these be available to view and buy? I looked at the website but could not find either needles or hooks.

Emms
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« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2006 01:16:17 PM »

They will be up very soon after I figure out how to tell you about them.
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loisgriffinwannabe
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« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2006 02:07:53 PM »

They will be up very soon after I figure out how to tell you about them.

oh ok lol.... I can't wait to see those needles... not so interested in the hooks, since I am not a crocheter :/
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sapphire_distortion
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2006 10:14:47 AM »

Sorry if this was covered in the stickied help topic...I didn't see it, though, so I thought I might ask here instead of starting a new thread - what kind of crochet hook is best for an absolute beginner? Is there one size that's more commonly used than the rest? Thanks guys! *sneaks out of thread*
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EowynUlysses
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2006 08:23:04 PM »

sapphire: I would say a big-ish hook is good for a beginner, because it makes it easier to see your stitches. (I recommend worsted weight variegated yarns for the same reason.) Really, what it all comes down to is what you are comfortable with. It might be useful to buy a few hook in different sizes and see what you like.
I learned on a K and love love that size.
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sapphire_distortion
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2006 06:31:58 AM »

sapphire: I would say a big-ish hook is good for a beginner, because it makes it easier to see your stitches. (I recommend worsted weight variegated yarns for the same reason.) Really, what it all comes down to is what you are comfortable with. It might be useful to buy a few hook in different sizes and see what you like.
I learned on a K and love love that size.

Thank you! Smiley I have a J right now and I'm having a heck of a time with it. I think I'm just having a hard time with crochet in general. I'm going to wait until the local Michael's has another class.
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AmigurumiMan
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2006 12:46:29 PM »

The traits that make hooks feel different to me are finish, hook shape, flexibility and pointiness.

FINISH - there are some hooks out there that don't feel like they have been properly finished, so it feels like the hook is catching on the yarn. I bought a Boye hook once that just didn't feel right, although it seemed identical to the rest of their hooks which normally feel fine. On closer inspection, it turned out to have more of a "matte" finish to it. You also get this feeling sometimes with bamboo and plastic hooks that have seams.  I can't stand this.

HOOK SHAPE - there are three main hook shapes out there - the most common, "Boye" type where the hook sticks out above the shaft, an "inline" shape that you see on the Susan Bates hooks, and a "notched" shape that you mostly see in bamboo and wood.  I like the protruding style in a big hook size, but for tight little things like amigurumi, the inline shape seems to be easier. The yarn seems to slip off the notched hooks sometimes, so I would look at how deep the notch is and whether there is any shaping to it to help prevent that.

FLEXIBILITY - I like a hook that feels a tiny bit flexible, but on the smaller hook sizes aluminum feels too flimsy, which I suppose is the reason steel hooks are used for things like lace work.  I love the way bamboo feels in my hand, but all the bamboo hooks I've seen suffer from other problems.  Plastic feels way too flimsy, except in the ginormous hook sizes.

POINTINESS - my biggest gripe with bamboo hooks is that the ones I've seen (Clover) have very pointy tips. This feels bad on my fingers and can split yarn, especially when coupled with bad finishing.

These are all just my own terms and my personal perspective, but I hope it helps.
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crafty mama
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« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2006 09:12:19 PM »

and hey, the new snb book has crochet hook terminology. oh debbie stoller, is there anything you can't do?
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They come out and whisper to me - J,LC
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