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Topic: Other methods of sc decreasing?  (Read 723 times)
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amy_ruth
« on: January 23, 2006 08:56:05 PM »

Hoping someone out there can help me out.

I have this Japanese crochet book with a symbol that I can't decipher, but that I'm pretty sure is referring to another method of decreasing other than the common way.

On most charts a standard decrease (for example stitch one, decrease one) is represented like by an "x" and an "x" with a ^ over it.

On some charts in this book, instead of the standard decrease symbol, this appears (again seeming to indicate stitch one decrease one):

x o

As far as I can make out with my less-than-perfect translation skills, the "o" means something like decrease while also increasing.  From the photos of the finished products, this seems to result in a much smoother-looking decrease.

Anyone have any idea how to do this type of decrease?  I thought there was only one way to decrease in single crochet, but maybe I'm wrong.

Your help is greatly appreciated!

Amy
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vanillaxlight
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« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2006 09:15:26 PM »

Wow, I'd be interested in knowing this as well because as of right now.. I have no clue. How do you decrease one, while increasing one...? Wouldnt that negate the decrease?
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« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2006 02:57:44 AM »

I have no idea either. BUT I have found that only going trough the front part of the sc's makes a nicer decrease, if that helps.
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« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2006 03:36:12 AM »

Well, I don't know a thing about japanese patterns and can't follow graphs for the life of me, but one thing I do know from doing tech support is that the first thing you do is to always make sure that the person is on the same page as you are.

So, when you do a sc decrease do you just skip the hole or do you sc the next 2 stitches together by drawing the loop through and moving onto the next stitch, doing a single crochet drawing through three loops instead of the normal 2?
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« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2006 11:11:28 AM »

I have been trying to decipher some Japanese patterns myself and I was under the impression the "o" (open circle) stood for a chain (like ch 1).  I have noticed that in the graphs they use for the rounds that there is usually a - or + with a number indicating increase or decrease. 
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amy_ruth
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2006 04:51:14 PM »

So, when you do a sc decrease do you just skip the hole or do you sc the next 2 stitches together by drawing the loop through and moving onto the next stitch, doing a single crochet drawing through three loops instead of the normal 2?

The latter.

I have been trying to decipher some Japanese patterns myself and I was under the impression the "o" (open circle) stood for a chain (like ch 1).  I have noticed that in the graphs they use for the rounds that there is usually a - or + with a number indicating increase or decrease. 

I know what you are talking about.  The book I'm using uses both symbols.  The chain symbol is more like an oval "0," while the mystery symbol is more spherical "O."

Thanks for continuing to help me decipher!

Amy
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