A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Please remember to SEARCH before asking a question that may have already been answered. Thanks!
Total Members: 304,769
Currently Running With Scissors:
449 Guests and 13 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1] 2  All
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Coloring Sculpey?  (Read 15910 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
pcockey
« on: January 15, 2006 10:37:40 PM »

I just got a big (1.75 pounds) box of white Sculpey. Now, I love the stuff, but I'm painting it and it's taking forever. Is it safe/advisable/thinkable to mix coloring agents into the Sculpey before baking? Paint, glitter, etc.? And yes, I know colored Sculpey is out there, but now I've got this huge box of white...
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Diane B.
Offline Offline

Posts: 5061
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2006 03:23:16 PM »

Polymer clays can definitely be colored, and in various ways.  Plain white Sculpey (in the box) is no different (though it is the weakest of all the polymer clays ... it's chalkiness after baking makes a great surface for drawing on with soft colored pencils though!). 

The two main things you'd probably use for coloring the raw clay are oil paints and alcohol inks (for those, apply to clay sheet, let alcohol evaporate off before mixing). 
You can use acrylic paints, but since they contain water (which can expand during heating and cause bubbles, etc.), you wouldn't want to use much in a specific bit of raw clay (or leave the colored clay out overnight before baking to let some evaporate).

Many other things can be used to give a solid color or a speckled color to raw clay ...for example, metallic powders, ground spices, pigments and dry tempera, fabric dyes, concentrated tea, crayon shavings,  play sands, some glitters, even dirt, etc., etc.
"Inclusions" such as those are generally put into translucent clay, or translucents mixed with colors, so that they'll show up somewhat "down into" the clay, butthey can also be mixed into opaque colors of polymer clay (like white or white tinted with a bit of other color) and will show up just on the outermost surface.

For baked polymer items which have texture or dimension, you could also color only the higher areas (highligting) or the depressions (antiquing) with various things, including oil or acrylic paints, metallic powders, etc.... or you can do similar things when the textured clay is still raw.  These would be ways to avoid having to "paint the whole thing."

You can get loads more info on all these topics on these pages of my site, if you're interested:

http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/paints.htm
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/letters_inks.htm

http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/powders_metallicwaxes.htm

http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/inclusions.htm

http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/color.htm



HTH,

Diane B.

THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
pcockey
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2006 08:50:12 PM »

Hmm. Well, the acrylics I have are exactly what they specify on there (W&N in tubes), so I'll try mixing some up now and leave it out to sculpt tomorrow. I don't need a whole lot of color with those paints anyway, and I'm doing beads so a bit will go a long way. Thanks!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Diane B.
Offline Offline

Posts: 5061
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2006 12:24:49 PM »

You should be fine with the Winsor Newton tube acrylics if you leave the mixed clay out awhile before baking, and especially if you don't use too much of it in the clay.

One thing that some clayers do though to keep the cost down is to buy a small set of oil paints in tiny tubes.  That should give you plenty of paint, and the paints can be premixed to just about any color you want before adding to the clay since you'll always have at least one yellow, blue, red, and black (and maybe white)...or, of course, you can mix new colors by mixing previously-tinted clays too .


Diane B.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
SaraiG
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2006 10:50:29 AM »

is food coloring okay? I don't have easy access to expensive coloring powders and Walmart only carries white clay >_< the closest possible carrier of colored clay is like 30 minutes away...
« Last Edit: May 03, 2006 10:54:47 AM by SaraiG » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Diane B.
Offline Offline

Posts: 5061
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2006 11:05:49 AM »

I've heard of putting food color in clay, I think, but don't know anything specific... just try it, but heed the warnings about letting the colored clay sit a bit before baking.

Many of the things I mentioned before aren't expensive though:

...regular acrylic paints are cheap --and you can get small sets of colors if you want --(tube acrylics aren't necessary for mixing into the clay though, they're just a bit better for antiquing baked clay because they're thicker and have less water)
...small sets of oil colors in tubes don't cost much more than food coloring

Those are the most common colorants... but there are also other possibilities:
...tempera powder is relatively cheap, but you usually have to buy larger containers
...powdered or liquid fabric dyes can be cheap if you already have them
...crayon shavings are cheap
...ground spices like paprika and turmeric can be cheap if you have them
...concentrated tea is cheap (and can be used to "tone" down any of the brighter colors, increasing the palette)

...alcohol inks can be a bit more expensive
...artist pigments are more expensive
...metallic powders are more expensive, but not usually used for coloring clay

Many of those things will be fairly messy to mix in though and may dye your hands, or may not be very resistant to fading later.   When you mix them, be sure to "capture" the color inside the clay before working it in, to keep as much as possible off your hands.

Plain white Sculpey in the box can be used for various other things so I keep some on hand even if I don't use it much... if you're interested in some of the things it's useful for, check out this page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/Characteristics.htm
(....click on Sculpeys... then scroll down to the stuff about plain original Sculpey)

As for suppliers of colored clays, many polymer clayers like to order their clay online anyway... it's cheaper than retail (except at any Michaels 99 cent sales), it's fresher, and you can get any color of any brand anytime you want... service is usually pretty fast too, and it comes right to your door. 

Online suppliers also often have larger bricks of clay which are even cheaper by weight. 

It's quite possible to buy only a few colors in the larger bricks, then mix a huge number of colors and palettes with them if you want to save money.  If you're interested in how to do that, look on this page:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/color.htm
(...click on Mixing Your Own Color Palette especially....)

And here's the page at my site listing the most common online sources... just compare prices for the brand you want, and decide then whether it's worth it:
http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/supplysources.htm
(...click on Mail Order...)




Diane B.
GlassAttic ...polymer clay "encyclopedia"
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm

for the upcoming all-polymer clay board here at craftster, check here!
http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=72141.msg813624#msg813624

« Last Edit: May 03, 2006 11:16:39 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
wanching
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2006 12:23:52 AM »

the normal kind of oil paints will do right?
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Diane B.
Offline Offline

Posts: 5061
Joined: 01-May-2004

GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2006 09:22:47 AM »

Quote
the normal kind of oil paints will do right?


Yep.  (as well as other things)



Diane B.

GlassAttic....polymer clay "encyclopedia"
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm






THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
wanching
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2006 01:11:18 AM »

o cool!...thanks... Wink
THIS ROCKS   Logged
lynbird22
Offline Offline

Posts: 123
Joined: 26-Apr-2006

Itchin' stitchin' fingers.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2006 10:05:24 PM »

I'm in the  same situation as pcockey - a huge amount of white Sculpey. I tried kneading in acrylic paint but it made the clay, kind of, break  down. It got brittle and it would not hold shape. I let it set and the situation was the same. Did I use too much paint at one time? I have quite a bit of acrylic paint  so I don't really want to buy alcohol dye. I will if necessary, but if I could get some feed back about the paint problems that would be great. Thanks!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

lynbird: making mothers nervous, since 1983.
Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] 2  All Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
How to Write Your First Movie
How to Make a Storyboard
How to Make a Music Video
How to Produce Videos on a Budget
How to Write the Perfect Holiday Movie
Latest Blog Articles
Meatless Monday: Pea, Potato, Leek, Mint Soup
@Home This Weekend: Create a Spooky Yard
CrafTATstic Crafty Tattoos: Featured Artist Katrina Polacek

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.