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Topic: do I need a serger to sell clothes?  (Read 7926 times)
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faerieangelchild
« Reply #60 on: September 09, 2009 09:08:31 PM »

Thanks to everyone who responded.

Thesingingllamas - I get where you're coming from. But I do already have a pretty successful business selling jewelry so I know the risks and money it takes to start an endeavor. I appreciate the tip about CA! I've been thinking about moving to CA soon and now I may have to reconsider it, haha. Oh, by the way, what is flatlocked?

CraftyMcCrafterson - That cute little tag idea might be a good idea just for when I'm getting started out. Thanks!

Other than that, I may consider testing out the french seam. It just doesn't seem very viable for the neckline because it needs a little bit of give. For the side seams though, it could work.

I'm also considering doing an exposed seam on the neckline. It's a love/hate thing but for the style of dresses I'm doing, it might work. Any opinions?

If anyone has any other ideas or recommendations, I'd love to hear it.
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Thesingingllamas
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« Reply #61 on: September 09, 2009 09:12:50 PM »

A flat lock is kind of like a serge. It is used on t-shirt hems and such. It has the two parallel lines. You can mimic this with a double needle, which does stretch. You might try playing around with a double needle. Try to find styles similar to what you want to make and see how they are constructed.
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faerieangelchild
« Reply #62 on: September 09, 2009 09:28:13 PM »

A flat lock is kind of like a serge. It is used on t-shirt hems and such. It has the two parallel lines. You can mimic this with a double needle, which does stretch. You might try playing around with a double needle. Try to find styles similar to what you want to make and see how they are constructed.

I know exactly what you're talking about! I've only heard it referred to as a coverlock. Thank you!
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Kot
« Reply #63 on: September 10, 2009 04:37:23 AM »

After the months of struggling with my serger (I lost...) I've found a great and cheap alternative for this %^$#%#^% machine. It's a cutting foot. I have one made by Brother, I know that it fits other machines too. It makes a great job, the stitches are smooth and flat and the edge of the fabric is perfectly finished. Long live Brother!
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rangerbeth
« Reply #64 on: September 10, 2009 06:37:28 AM »

I just have a Walmart brother cheapo machine and it has an overcast foot. Its similar to zigzag but encases the raw edges of the fabric. They even have a stitch that's set for knits. Again, it may add to your time, but maybe quality over quantity is a good thing?
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hoxierice
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« Reply #65 on: September 10, 2009 09:44:51 AM »

I agree with Thesingingllamas and on a side note I also hate unfinished edges as a style. I once had a student who tried to convince me that she didn't want to hem her pj pants because she wanted the frayed look. I told her that she had to hem her pants, or she would get points taken off because it was a sewing class you had to hem your pants. Then once she was graded she could do whatever she wanted.

But back on topic. I think part of what Thesingingllamas is saying is that you will get people who won't buy your stuff if the edges aren't serged. Some people might stop to look, but not buy seeing that the edges aren't serged. So on the one hand if it doesn't work out you haven't wasted money on a serger, on the other hand you don't know how much more you would have sold if you had a serger.

And most people have answered this question as if it were about wovens and it wouldn't work/be practical to finish seams those ways.
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CaityBear
« Reply #66 on: November 16, 2010 12:58:08 PM »

Do you serge all your seams on your clothes?

Also, do you sell your clothes? Do you find it's an absolute must to serge??

I am currently not selling my clothes, but I do not own a serger right now so if I need to finish off the seams I usually just do a zig zag.
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