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Topic: Costuming Portfolio?  (Read 650 times)
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skye691
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« on: December 23, 2005 10:40:43 PM »

I had a quick question..

I'm working on applying for an internship with the Oregon Shakespeare festival. They have openings in their costume shop, but they want to see a portfolio. I don't have a formal portfolio put together yet, but because of this _awesome_ opportunity, I'm working on getting one together.

So, what I was wondering is..

What sorts of things need to go in there? I realize that sketches and pictures of finished pieces need to go in there, but is there anything in specific that I should make a point of including? do you think that adding historical pieces would be a wise idea? Should I include detail shots?

any and all help is appreciated, thanks ladies!
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« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2005 01:08:03 PM »

Yes definately include historical peices if you have any. Costume sketches and detailed drawings
Also some simple sewing samples of basic sewing techniques are whats standard in the costume biz.
stuff like:
Hand sewing and embroidery samples
pleating samples
piping and bound seams
flat-fell and french seams
pin tucks
a completed collar for a mens dress shirt
a curved seam
a pointed seam
even a straight seam

These can be executed in little 8X5 inch peices of factory cotton, nothing fancy. It sounds simple and redundant but it just shows that you can put together a garment well from the very begining. Basically if you cant sew a straight line, then how can you expect to put together an elizabethan bodice, right?
They just need to see that you can do what you say you can do.
Put them all together in a little book called sewing samples for them to flip through.
Make sure they are perfectly executed and ironed
You may even want to bring some of your best work with you if you have an interview. The real garment is always better than a photograph.

Hope that helps!
Good luck hope you get it!!
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Chilan
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2005 06:29:09 PM »

I'm not sure how or if this applies to you, but if there is a certain area of costuming, fiber arts, or whatever that you are interested in and have actively pursued and experimented in, you could be sample swashes of those.  For example...  I have an interest in fiber arts/surface design.  Basically, all of the bizzare and odd ways that you can make fabric interesting.  This has led to a lot of experimentation.  I would, therefore, put a swash of all the different techniques that I've done.

I have yet to take a portfolio class, but I have talked to some people who have already been in it.  They suggested taking pictures of all the steps you took to make something, like a corset.  Drafting the pattern, cutting, fitting the muslin, altering......  Granted, this is a bit difficult in retrospect, but if you happen to have anything like that, or are currently working on a project, I'd recommend that.
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