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Topic: Survey: Continental vs. English  (Read 18826 times)
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Nuno930
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2005 07:43:13 AM »

1.Where do you live? Iowa, USA

2.What style do you prefer?
Continental

3.Who taught you how to knit? (do you know their lineage?) Stitch n Bitch/ some random books/ Knittinghelp.com

4. Have you tried, successfully or not, to change styles throughout your knitting life? If yes, why? Yes, I started English (since most books in US teach that.) Switched to Continental about 4 months in to learning how to knit... it looked faster and much less stress on the hands (which it is!)
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starlings
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2005 08:42:42 AM »

1.Where do you live? Nova Scotia, Canada

2.What style do you prefer?
English

3.Who taught you how to knit? My Nan and Grandad, who are English.

4. Have you tried, successfully or not, to change styles throughout your knitting life? If yes, why? Yes, I have tried. I can actually knit quite successfully in the Continental style, although it does affect my gauge. It's the purling I have trouble with. And in fair isle, I have no trouble knitting two-handed.

EDIT: A couple of days ago, I finally cracked my continental purl problem. I immediately could rib as quickly coninentally as I could English. I think the difficulty lay in convincing my brain to move the needle around the yarn, instead of moving the yarn around the needle.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2005 06:01:04 AM by starlings » THIS ROCKS   Logged
bronxie
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« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2005 08:52:32 AM »

Great thread!
1.Where do you live?  USA, Bronx, NY
2.What style do you prefer? English
3.Who taught you how to knit? (do you know their lineage?) Well, I taught myself how to knit but my aunt used to knit and she tried to teach me when I was younger but I wasn't interested.  We're Puertorican but my aunt's Gma was Italian.
4. Have you tried, successfully or not, to change styles throughout your knitting life? If yes, why?  I've tried to change to continental but it's just not for me.
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Lothruin
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« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2005 10:06:14 AM »

I mentioned this in another thread, but it's relevant here too.  Even in England until about the beginning of the 18th century, or maybe midway through the 17th century, most knitting was done in the continental style.  The "English" method of knitting was introduced as a way for women to look more ladylike while knitting.  High born women were not knitting out of neccessity, so their speed didn't matter as much.  They knit in what was then called the "parlor style" and they mostly made little lacey things that took many, many tea times to complete.  Yet at that time most people who were knitting for need still used the continental method, because it was faster and you had better control of the yarn.  So, though the style has been much improved, I'm sure, it was actually the inferior method when it was developed, if you're talking about actually knitting things and not just having a hobby for your hands while you chat with the ladies.

Also, maybe of interest, knitting is not exactly traditional women's work.  Knitting was originally very much a man's hobby and didn't cross the gender lines until the mid 17th century.  And in some cultures it has never gone out of style for men to knit.  It wasn't given over to "women's work" until VERY late in it's history, primarily in the last two centuries or so in those cultures where it ever became just women's work.

As for the survey:

Where do you live?  The Midwestern USA
What style do you prefer?  I'm continental all the way.  I learned to crochet at a very young age and controlling the tension with my left hand just makes so much more sense than the other way.  I can't even begin to understand how English is done.
Who taught you to knit? (do you know their lineage?)  I taught myself to knit.  However, my Oma (my grandma from Germany) and I have had several discussions since then on the more complicated aspects of knitting.  She was an avid knitter and crocheter before the MS took over her fine motor skills, and she knits continental.
Have you tried, successfully or not, to change styles throughout your knitting life?  If yes, why?  I've only been knitting for a year and a half, and when I sat down to learn I examined both methods carefully and picked continental, because, as I said, English makes no sense to me at all.  AT ALL I tel you.  I've never tried to learn the throw method since then, but in all fairness, I'm still learning anyway.
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« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2005 10:35:54 AM »

1.Where do you live? Texas, usa

2.What style do you prefer? English

3.Who taught you how to knit? My mother tried to teach me when I was a teenager, but she wasn't a very good teacher.  I ended up just figuring it out on my own via knitting books and the internet.

4. Have you tried, successfully or not, to change styles throughout your knitting life? If yes, why?  Not really.  I haven't seen the need for changing.
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« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2005 11:17:14 AM »

1.Where do you live?  Ohio, USA
2.What style do you prefer?  Continental
3.Who taught you how to knit? English-style knitters in a knitting class
4. Have you tried, successfully or not, to change styles throughout your knitting life?  8 years ago I was taught the English way of knitting but was struggling with it and asked if it was possible to knit holding the yarn in my left hand, like I do when I crochet.  One of the instructors was left handed (I'm right-handed) and showed me the way she knits, and I've been a continental knitter ever since.
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subloke
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2005 11:23:43 AM »

1.  Where do you live?  Calgary, AB  (Canada)
2.  What style do you prefer?  Continental
3.  Who taught you to knit?  A combination of my mom and my grandma (my mom's mom).  Both born in Canada, of Mennonite (German-ish) heritage
4.  Have you tried, successfully or not, to change styles throughout your knitting life?  If yes, why?  
Yes!!  I learned to knit "English" style, which is how I was taught.  About this time last year, I started researching on-line what "continental" knitting was, since I had never known there was another way to knit (I don't know that many knitters).  I tried it and, although it was slower at first, it felt more natural, since I learned to crochet when I was young too (mom/grandma taught).  (It was also through teaching myself a new method that I learned more about how stitches are formed and that I had somehow been making a twisted stitch every time I purled!)  I find that I'm faster in continental and my tension is more even.  I'm glad I know both ways though, and I wouldn't think one was superior across the board!  Whichever works better for you and allows you to still knit!  
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« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2005 11:28:08 AM »

1.Where do you live? Way out in the boonies, NY.  I learned in Westchester, though.
2.What style do you prefer? Continental.  I purl English, but I am SO SLOW.
3.Who taught you how to knit? (do you know their lineage?)My aunt, she's um, a lot of things, mostly American.  26th generation, so I dunno.  German, French, Irish, Scottish, English, I guess.
4. Have you tried, successfully or not, to change styles throughout your knitting life? If yes, why? Yes, and I'm not good at it.  I end up wrapping the yarn about a million times for one stich, my tenesion is WAY off, and it hurts my hands.  I tried because I thought I was knitting wrong.  I didn''t know there were two ways of knitting.
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elijor
« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2005 11:30:57 AM »

1.Where do you live? Wichita Kansas (but have lived all over the world due to military).

2.What style do you prefer? Continental (but I prefer to call it German).

3.Who taught you how to knit? (do you know their lineage?) My mother when I was a teenager but I prefered crochet back then. My mom was born in Sudenten Deutchland and raised in West Germany. A freind refreshed me a few months ago. Also this forum and knittinghelp.com have been wonderful assets.

4. Have you tried, successfully or not, to change styles throughout your knitting life? If yes, why? When my freind refreshed me she knits English style so I tried it, for a few minutes anyway, but gave that up and switched to "German" and took off like lightening.

Incidentally, several people have mentioned trying to purl English and I have a tip. When I first started again I always twisted my stitches when purling. I looked at knittinghelp.com and they show a really akward way of purling "German" style that involves holding the working yarn down with your index finger - totally uncomfortable but better than trying to learn "English". I remembered watching my mom knit and never seeing her do any akward twisting thing but I had to wait a month to see her. She simply wraps the yarn twice and as you take the right needle under the left to form the stitch that extra half loop slips off - voila a purl, done "German" style without the akward index finger thing. I found a site that demoed it while looking for something else - if I can find it again I'll post it.


This is not the site I found the other day and it doesn't have video but it does have good pictures. http://www.teddys-handarbeiten.de/xstrick-gr-linke-masche.htm You have to scroll down to Linke-Masche. Looking at the 5th picture I actually place my right index finger on top of the yarn for just an instant as I move the right needle under the left and out of the loop to keep the wrapped yarn in place.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2005 12:55:10 PM by elijor » THIS ROCKS   Logged
ariisi
« Reply #19 on: October 16, 2005 11:59:39 AM »

1.Where do you live? Marquette, Michigan

2.What style do you prefer? English

3. Who taught you how to knit? (do you know their lineage?) Stitch n Bitch

4. Have you tried, successfully or not, to change styles throughout your knitting life? If yes, why? Yes, I tried to switch recently, but I was just to slow. I do mean to try again.
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