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Topic: Blockout pens with screenfiller?  (Read 738 times)
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craft-matic
« on: September 26, 2005 08:38:59 AM »

So I'm interested in starting screenprinting, but photoemulsion is out of the question (my apartment is totally unsuitable....no dark rooms, finicky landlord, etc.....).  The screenfiller method looks interesting, but I was concerned by posts suggesting you can't get good detail or fine lines.  I happened across this little thing on dick blicks site, the blockout pen:

http://www.dickblick.com/zz449/28/

and began to think it might be interesting to use it to trace the outline of the design, to get sharp edges and good detail, and then to paint in the rest with screenfiller?

I wanted to find out wether anybody had done this, or used these pens at all, and what they think of the method.  Maybe nobody has used them yet.  If that's so, maybe I'll give it a try and post my experiences  Smiley  .......after I get paid, that is... Undecided
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« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2005 09:37:02 AM »

you could try a print gocco.  you get the same detail quality that you'd get with photo emulsion, but the screens are pretreated, so there's no mess and no waiting for stuff to dry, etc. 
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craft-matic
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2005 10:34:48 AM »

Totally can't afford that, that's why I'm looking for cheap alternatives....

I've heard freezer paper is good, cause you can iron it on and it sticks, so it's like a great stencil with no underspray?
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« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2005 01:48:38 PM »

yes.  contact paper also works well.  and you could try cardstock or transparencies (like the kind teacher's use for overhead projectors) to cut your image out and then use stencil adhesive spray to make it stick. 
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craft-matic
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2005 03:27:47 PM »

With those methods, will the quality be comparable to a silk screen? 

I heard of a woman who uses the freezer paper directly on a framed silkscreen, and the paper blocks the ink as well as the regular stuff (Though I imagine it wouldn't work for very many pullings).  But this way she doesn't have to cut each image continuously, like a stencil, she can have islands, which she positions on the screen in the proper place before ironing them on. 

I guess that's kind of what I'm going for....a more detailed image than stenciling allows, but without as much fuss (at least until I see how much I like doing it...if I really like it, I may invest in some equipment, but I'm definitely unable to go that far before I've tried it out a little, and found out whether the cheaper possibilities aren't sufficient....)

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« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2005 05:23:11 PM »

hmmmm.... it would probably be the most comparable to the screen filler method, but i think that even with screen filler you'd get more detailed results that with a stencil.
i have no patience when i'm sitting there cutting out teeny islands and detail with a stencil, so i rush and the results aren't always great.  i find it a lot easier (and faster) using screenfiller to kind of draw it on. 
i've heard of people using mod podge instead of filler, which is probably quite a bit cheaper, but from my experience, mod podge is not at all water resistant, so i'm not sure how durable that it. 
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