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Topic: Ink, paint, or whatever...  (Read 687 times)
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Meegie
« on: September 07, 2005 01:56:05 PM »

 I know this question has been asked one hundred and one times but...

What kind of ink or paint do you use when you stencil on tee-shirts?  I tried using acrylic paint with textile medium mixed in, but the fabric just got really hard and the paint cracked after one wash.  It was very dissapointing.  So what are some good things to use?
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« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2005 02:03:00 PM »

i use this stuff called plaid glaze by vernis barniz.  its in a little bottle, over in the uses section it says "fabric when heat set" it has worked pretty good for me so far.  My shirts been through the wash a few times and it still looks good.  Also try using some screen printing textile ink.  That stuffs the best you could use.
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minouette
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2005 02:18:42 PM »

I second the screen printing textile ink. Different colours come in different qualities (because of the chemistry and difficulty of making certain colours). I've also screen printed onto fabric with regular permanent - but water-based (avoid nasty oil based inks with volatile organic chemicals and the evils of turpentine  Tongue)- screen printing ink. That also works well.

In theory you should be able to use acrylics with textile medium. You may need to experiment more with propotions. I've never tried that, so I'm not sure how to avoid cracking.
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« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2005 05:25:03 PM »

for the acrylic with textile medium it should be half and half
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« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2005 05:02:01 PM »

I don't want to start a whole new post for this, so I'll ask here... what kind of paint is good for doing white on dark colors, esp. black, without having to do a lot of layers to get it bright?
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minouette
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2005 11:15:15 AM »

Just check the opacity on the label. Different types of paints and inks have different opacity (how opaque or non-transparent it is) and different light-fastness and such. I've had very little problem using textile screenprinting ink. Occasionally, two layers are needed- but never many many layers. Also, if you want a light colour on black, doing a white layer first can be a great help.
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« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2005 04:53:58 PM »

ya, for white on dark go with textile screen printing ink.
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« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2005 05:24:51 PM »

also, plastisol textile inks are much thicker and opaque, BUT they require that you heat set with a flash cure unit (or an oven, and it's STINKY!).
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