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Topic: Some questions from absolute newbie...  (Read 1262 times)
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PepsiTwist
« on: September 05, 2005 06:56:00 PM »

Hey, sorry you got another newbie here to ask questions...

I'm amazed at the beautiful quilts everyone on here has made and it has inspired me to try and make my own as i already love them, i have a really huge butterfly one thats almost the the point i need to get rid of it but its sooo warm and cozy...oopps sorry neways I'd love to try this out but i have some dumb questions to ask first. I have to go to bed in 10 mins so i dont have time at the moment to look around and get all this info so some  things have probably already been answered, ill look tomorrow when i get home.
1) Can you use any type of fabric?
2) What is binding?
3) Do you juss sew the squares together like your making a pillow except only sew one side at a time to diff squares? (sorry if that didn't make much sense)
4) Do you use interfacing?, cuz i read somewhere on the internet when i googled it that you do, but i dont want my quilt to be hard...

Thats all I can think of that i need to know but then again im tired. If there is anything else u think might help me please tell me..Thanks for any advice/answers.

P.S. I'm going to be going to the library soon, any suggestions on books i might look for?
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cmoore
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2005 07:38:09 PM »

Hey PepsiTwist, despite being a coke fan myself, Smiley  I'll see if I can help you out;

Quote
1) Can you use any type of fabric?

Yes, though some fabrics lend themselves better to quilting. 100% woven cotton is the general standard, and for good reason. It has less stretch, is easy to handle and takes a lot of abuse. You can use other fabrics, but with the exception of maybe a crazy quilt, you will want to use fairly stable fabrics, and if not all the same content, at least try to use ones that are roughly all the same weight.

Quote
2) What is binding?

This is a long strip of fabric usually cut on the bias and pieced together, which covers the outer raw edges of the finished quilt.
I usually fold my binding strips in half lengthwise and pin the raw edges to the front of the quilt (Along the raw edge of the quilt), sew, and then flip the binding strip to the back and sew that in place. Or you can use extra wide double fold bias tape.
Here is some info on binding and going around corners, mitres, etc.

Quote
3) Do you juss sew the squares together like your making a pillow except only sew one side at a time to diff squares? (sorry if that didn't make much sense)

Try to break your sewing down into rows. Sew all the blocks in one row together (so only two opposite edges of each block are sewn and you end up with a long strip of squares), then do the next row the same way and so on. When that is done, start sewing the rows together.

Quote
4) Do you use interfacing?, cuz i read somewhere on the internet when i googled it that you do, but i dont want my quilt to be hard...

Unless you are using an unstable knit or lightweight silk, you do not need interfacing. I woud avoid those types of fabrics for a first try at quilting anyway. Use cottons, broadcloths, or other stable woven fabrics.


Oh books, My favorite reccomendation remains Singer's Quilting Bible. I learned all the basics with that one.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2005 07:39:54 PM by cmoore » THIS ROCKS   Logged
determinedimprovisation
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« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2005 07:56:24 PM »

if you're new at quilting, try paper-piecing (aka foundation piecing).  it's amazingly easy and you can make all sorts of detailed things with just little scraps.  you get a pattern, which looks like so:

printing/tracing on normal paper works fine.  the side with the pattern on it goes down when placing the fabric, and up when sewing.
cut a scrap slightly larger than the space marked 1, lay it right side up on 1.  take a piece larger than space 2, place it right side down, so when you sew on the line between 1 and 2 and fold 2 over, it will cover the space.  holding the whole shebang up to the light helps to line up pieces.  do 3, 4, 5, and so on the same way.  that's a pretty poor explaination, but really, it is easy.  and once you get the hang of it, you can do all sorts of stuff.  my mom made me a huge zebra wall quilt where every stripe was a different piece.
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PepsiTwist
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2005 07:16:03 PM »

o wow thanks for such quick replys! Thanks for answering my questions and other adive as well, yall both helped me out tremendously, I can't wait to get started. I have two other questions tho for future references
1) Can you embroider an entire quilt (all the different blocks), would this look/feel good?
2) If I transfer pictures to it like through iron on or sunshine or something to the effect would it be able to withstand everyday use and occasional washings or would it be better as a wall hanging if i did this?

Thanks bunches for all the help youve already given me!! : )
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cmoore
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2005 07:58:01 PM »

Embroidering works great on quilts. There are several very old examples like crazy quilts or redwork.

An iron-on transfer should be washable, provided you follow whatever instructions come with the transfer sheets. You can also print directly onto paper using an epson printer with durabright inks, or another pigment ink printer. For other types of printers, you can make a print washfast by first treating it with a product called bubble jet set.
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determinedimprovisation
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« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2005 08:11:20 PM »

walmart sells specially treated muslin that you just run through the printer, let dry, rise, and *le poof* beautiful pictures you can stitch in.  (i forgot the name of this stuff, and you can find it at other stores, but it's soooo much cheaper at walmart.  should be by the cutting mats and blades.)  iron ons work too, but won't feel as nice. 
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TheDishclothQueen
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2005 10:39:49 PM »

if you're new at quilting, try paper-piecing (aka foundation piecing). 

Ugh...I hate paper piecing!  While it is relatively easy, I thought it was incredibly fiddly, a pain in my @$$, a waste of good fabric, and not at ALL worth the trouble.

For your first quilt, don't pick one that uses templates (I did....not a great idea).  I suggest something simple like a log cabin.  Depending on how you turn the strips, you can get some really dynamic results, and it's an easy pattern to learn the basics on.

Good luck!
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cmoore
« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2005 11:57:54 PM »

Actually a rail fence or nine-patch would be far easier than a log cabin-the chance for wonkyness is proportional to the number of seams. Wink
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spirals420
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« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2005 01:38:33 PM »

i am right now making for my first quilt a whole bunch of triangles and making them into squares and then just sewing those all up... i have no idea what this is.. its easy to me.. we will see how it goes...  good luck with your quilt.. hope my turns out ok...
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TheDishclothQueen
« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2005 02:13:29 PM »

Actually a rail fence or nine-patch would be far easier than a log cabin-the chance for wonkyness is proportional to the number of seams. Wink

Now to me nine-patch is harder because there's seams to be matched.  But maybe that's just 'cuz I'm anal about perfectly matched seams  Cheesy
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