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Topic: All these American ingredients confuse me...  (Read 31180 times)
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efitch
« Reply #260 on: May 08, 2006 09:30:06 AM »

Quote
butter is meant to be yellow. its fat. fat is yelllow.

Actually, most fat is whitish.   I think the color of milkfat depends on what the cow is fed. 

Quote
what is american bread like?

Well, the standard American sandwich bread has (up until recently) been white bread - slices about 1/2 inch thick of soft white bread with a soft-ish crust.    Wonder Bread http://www.wonderbread.com/ is the popular brand(in the South, at least).   Nowadays, though, you can find just about any kind of bread.  Of course,  I live in the city, so I'm probably a little spoiled in terms of diversity.     
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« Reply #261 on: May 08, 2006 09:46:38 AM »

Yeah, regular mass-produced American bread is very soft and tasteless and bland, but even most mass grocery stores have bakeries these days, and there are lots of local and national producers of nice bread of all types. There are regional specialties like sourdough or rye, and all kinds of variations of great breads. But wonder bread is probably what most people think of as "American Bread" (and it still makes a damn good grilled cheese or PB & J!  Wink  )
« Last Edit: May 08, 2006 12:43:05 PM by batgirl » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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poncy
« Reply #262 on: May 08, 2006 12:37:49 PM »

Okay.  This has been one of my favorite food posts so far because 1) I HEART food and 2) I am from the South.  Several good points have been made already, like cornbread is NOT sweet (very important) but several misconceptions: GREENS is a generic term that refers to any greens- collards, kale, mustard, etc.

Collards are not bitter if cooked properly and picked at the right time.  Mustard greens are very bitter and an acquired taste for most.  You must add hot sauce and a splash of pepper vinegar to any greens for an authentic experience.

Southern food (soul food) is very much based on African and Central/South American food- that is, heavy on the beans, pork, hot sauce and tomatoes.  The important thing to remember is that vegetables are not necessarily vegetarian, as most are cooked with fatback or saltpork for a long time until they are stew-like.

Several important things left out t hat you should try: hushpuppies (fried dough that is also NOT sweet- eaten with fried fish and incredibly tasty), fried okra (yum), blackeyed peas, fried green tomatoes, sweet potato souffle and Brunswick stew.  (You get the picture- everything is pretty much deep fried). 

Boiled peanuts are one of my all-time favorite foods and you can buy them on the side of the road in the early fall from vendors.  Kind of like hot, salty chickpeas.  Cocacola cake, pineapple upsidedown cake, red velvet cake, pecan pie.  Desserts are incredibly sweet and rich.  They don't hold back on anything...sugar, fat, salt, spices.  Walk into a Southern restaurant and order iced tea and it is invariably sweet (unless you request unsweetened, which makes you suspicious). 

Barbeque is another subject unto itself, but the person from South Carolina covered that pretty well with the mustard vs. tomato-based variations.  I prefer the tomato myself.

Southern food is incredibly rich and usually requires a long nap afterward if you eat a traditional menu.  Not for everyday, of course, but damn tasty every once in a while.

Oh, one other weird SOuthern food tradition...salt on fruit (like the Latin Americans).  I can't eat an apple or a pear or watermelon without salt on it.  Makes the fruit sweeter by contrast.



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« Reply #263 on: May 08, 2006 02:10:56 PM »

All this talk about southern food has made me so hungry for my mom's cooking! Even though i'm from northern virginia, which most people insist is NOT the south, i love southern food.  In my family,

the only good tea is sweet tea, which is impossible to find unless you drive an hour south.

birch beer is the best thing to come from pennsylvania.

shrimp and grits is amazing... i just had to get the guts up to try it first lol.

scrapple is the quickest way to a heart attack in the north.

all soda is coke until otherwise specified.

and waffle house is hands down the best place for breakfast (although the breakfast will cause a heart attack and the smoking will cause cancer... still amazing).
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pacasha
« Reply #264 on: May 09, 2006 10:06:25 AM »

about the 'american bread' thing.
my husband and all of my inlaws from New Zealand think that american bread is sweet. i don't notice, but they sure did and they complained the ENTIRE time they visited about all the sugar and sweetness in EVERYTHING. I think it's funny cause I bought some strawberry jelly from NZ to bring back over here, cause it tasted sweeter than what I was used to... so if you are foreign and you buy american food, buy the sugarless kind and don't complain. food is just different everywhere you go. i found that to be the most thrilling part of traveling.
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rachikus
« Reply #265 on: May 09, 2006 09:38:57 PM »

yay.
i like pavlova. my mum made it today for my dads birthday. hahahahaha.
i like food. and different food especially chinese.
that doesn't have anything to do with this but anyway...
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terin
« Reply #266 on: May 09, 2006 10:54:41 PM »

this board answers so many questions...about my mother.  she grew up in nashville, but i was raised in ohio.  some of my mother's eating behaviour's that i failed to adopt:  the karo syrup on pancakes, sorgum molasses (sp?), copious amounts of butter on everything, salt on everything (including fresh tomatos eaten like an apple), catfish, leftover thanksgiving sandwichies consisting only of turkey, white bread, loads of butter, salt, and pepper.  some of the foods that i'm hooked on:  biscuits (of course), collard greens (although i make my own vegetarian version that's actually pretty good), molasses cookies, pecan pie, fried ocra, and more.  i also thought that tea was naturally sweet for a long time.  i never even thought i liked iced tea until i discovered that you could have it unsweetened. 
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« Reply #267 on: May 09, 2006 11:18:14 PM »

I think it's funny cause I bought some strawberry jelly from NZ to bring back over here, cause it tasted sweeter than what I was used to...

First of all... hee hee! Jelly!
Secondly, a lot of foreign people often tell me that NZ's jams and yoghurts are really sweet. I don't know why...
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rachikus
« Reply #268 on: May 10, 2006 12:15:04 AM »

i hope you mean jam.
i like jelly. i really love blue jelly.[aka jell-o]
it makes my little brother hyper so we can't have it.
oh how i love jelly.and jelly crystals.
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« Reply #269 on: May 10, 2006 05:42:58 AM »

Yep, in the US "Jam" is jam with chunky bits of fruit and "Jelly" is the smooth kind with no chunks (then there's preserves but I'm honestly not sure what the difference is between that and jam). Many people, probably most, refer to both as "jelly" in daily conversation though.  Gelatin type dessert is ALWAYS referred to as the brand name "Jello" although on packages of different brands I think it says "Gelatin" or something, but no one ever calls it anything but Jello, and that's the only major brand (other brands are usually generics from the particular store or vegan products from small natural companies) Hope that helps!

*I don't think you're ready for this jelly*
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