A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: If you see a project that you think is awesome and deserves to be a featured project, you can click the THIS ROCKS button to nominate it!
Total Members: 297,495
Currently Running With Scissors:
623 Guests and 28 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: 1 ... 11 12 [13] 14 15 ... 42
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: All these American ingredients confuse me...  (Read 29314 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
erikau
« Reply #120 on: September 11, 2005 08:17:30 AM »


(If you mention "cheerios" to an Australians, they will think little pink sausages, commonly found served hot with tomato sauce at kid's birthday parties....or they were, back in my day)

There's a big difference between American mincemeat-a sweet fruit and spice based pie filling, and Australian minced meat--hamburger.
My father in law once ordered a mince pie with vanilla icecream while on shore leave in Australia.  Since he got into an argument with the servier over whether that was really what he wanted, he felt obligated to eat it!

erika
« Last Edit: September 23, 2005 07:18:54 PM by erikau » THIS ROCKS   Logged
annalou
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 555
Joined: 01-Aug-2004


View Profile
« Reply #121 on: September 11, 2005 04:54:35 PM »

LOL i think that thing about the coke is hilarious! a friend of mine from boston and I were having the soda-pop conversation and were agreeing very heartily that it is soda, and that pop is married to ma. we asked another friend who is from mississippi and she told us about that coke thing two weeks before it showed up here.  we looked at her like she was insane. coke is coke, we said. there is no pepsi-coke, or sprite-coke or mr.pibb-coke. and then it shows up here. and it made me laugh so hard!

I'm adding just a clarification.  Back home, if we want what most people call "coke,"  we'll ask for a CocaCola to distinguish it from the generic term.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

When's the last time you were inspired?
_Steph_
« Reply #122 on: September 11, 2005 05:04:30 PM »

My NE Ohio friends and in-laws think it is funny that where I'm from, (AL and GA) when you say you want a coke, the waitress asks what kind. (To which I reply "Dr. Pepper")

When I moved here from Atlanta, I almost got suspended for talking back when my asst. principal asked me "What are you drinking - is that pop?!" And I said "Pop What?" (He thought I was being rude - I was actually asking what he popped!)
But that isn't why I almost got suspended... when he took me to his office for talking back (about the "pop") and got super-rude, I told him to F Off and THAT's why I almost got suspended LOL!!

Drifted OT a bit - but yeah, I love the differences in what people call things, always have!

Steph
THIS ROCKS   Logged

~Steph~
annalou
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 555
Joined: 01-Aug-2004


View Profile
« Reply #123 on: September 11, 2005 07:10:02 PM »

Other things I remember growing up in coastal Texas:  crawdads (aka mudbugs or crayfish, a freshwater crustacean that looks like a miniature lobster) hush puppies (kinda like the chips of fish & chips, but larger and more bread-like), putting Tabasco on most things (including your breakfast eggs) pralines (very sweet caramel-like candy with pecans in it), bread pudding (a dessert/breakfast item made from stale bread, eggs, sugar, milk, and a few other baking odds and ends), and sun tea (tea made by placing water and tea leaves in a glass jar and leaving it in the sun to "cook").  Plus, for us, BBQ was beef, most likely a beef brisket cooked (as some folks mentioned earlier) very slowly, in a pit (either a hole in the ground or in a contraption made from a large metal cylinder around a yard/a meter in diameter).
THIS ROCKS   Logged

When's the last time you were inspired?
jag5000
Offline Offline

Posts: 105
Joined: 23-Apr-2005

she's not just my daughter - she's pop art!


View Profile
« Reply #124 on: September 11, 2005 07:22:06 PM »

wow! this thread got big! .. and it's making me so hungry!!

I just have to point out the google ad that is on this screen;

Quote
Discount Pork Pies
New & used Pork Pies. aff
Check out the huge selection now!
www.eBay.com

YUK!!!  like I'm going to buy a 'used' pork pie!!?!

LMAO
THIS ROCKS   Logged

"I craft, therefore I am"
eowynmn
Supergirl
Offline Offline

Posts: 207
Joined: 12-Jul-2005

Hello Nurse!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #125 on: September 12, 2005 08:21:57 AM »

eowynmn -- yes, I'm a Minnesotan. Unfortunately, I didn't make it to the fair this year. =( One of my favorite things to do is to explain the Pricess Kay of the Milky Way butter sculptures to foreigners. They make entertaining faces.

Just thought I would share this picture of me (the blonde) and my friend Amy who had never been to the Minnesota State fair before.  We are looking amazed at the guys making the DEEP FRIED CANDY BARS.
That's right.  they put candy bars on sticks (like snickers) and dip them in batter...deep fry them and cover them with powdered sugar.  HOWEVER, I have not tried one.

THIS ROCKS   Logged
GloryB
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 1280
Joined: 24-Sep-2004

I have a sewing machine, and I know how to use it


View Profile
« Reply #126 on: September 12, 2005 11:16:36 AM »

wow! this thread got big! .. and it's making me so hungry!!

I just have to point out the google ad that is on this screen;

Quote
Discount Pork Pies
New & used Pork Pies. aff
Check out the huge selection now!
www.eBay.com

YUK!!!  like I'm going to buy a 'used' pork pie!!?!

LMAO


I'm not seeing that particular add,  but I think the "pork pie" they are refering to are hats.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
lasandri
originator of the term "crackster", as in craftster is like crack.
Offline Offline

Posts: 2499
Joined: 29-Jun-2004


View Profile WWW
« Reply #127 on: September 12, 2005 11:20:06 AM »

That's right.  they put candy bars on sticks (like snickers) and dip them in batter...deep fry them and cover them with powdered sugar.  HOWEVER, I have not tried one.



they're really really really good... i've had mars bars....
THIS ROCKS   Logged

sibee
« Reply #128 on: September 12, 2005 11:48:02 AM »

De-lurking to say:
I took a linguistics course in college and at one point we studied how terms differ between regions of the US, and one of the main examples was the coke/soda/pop usage.  The 'official' conclusion was that people who referred to carbonated beverages as 'coke' were generally from or had family who once lived in the South.  Though, my entire family are born and raised Californians, and we all refer to it as 'coke', so I don't really believe that theory.  Maybe we're just a southern family at heart....
Also, the idea of a deep-fried candy bar is so disgusting to me; I felt my arteries clog just reading about it.  So why the hell do I want to try one so badly?
THIS ROCKS   Logged
craft-matic
« Reply #129 on: September 12, 2005 12:24:23 PM »

I think the reason Southerners call soda(pop) coke is because Coca-cola was invented, and has its hq, right here in Atlanta, GA.  In fact, Coke money is putting me through grad school (thanks, Coke, in spite of your global corporate hegemony..... Undecided)

I grew up in the southern plains (SE Nebraska) and have lived in the south for a good while now, and I have to say there is something about southern cooking I just can't get enough of.  While traditionally, it does involve a lot of grease, there are many restaurants in ATL now that are doing home-cookin' a bit lighter. 

I can't believe no one has yet mentioned fried green tomatoes.  That is one of the very best things about life here in the south.  I'm not kidding.  These things are so good they've brought me to tears. 

And the fresh sugar-snap peas.  And crawdads.  And catfish.  And coconut shrimp on the Alabama coast....

And there are NO finer onions than the vidalias, and we get 'em fresh as fresh.  Lucky us Smiley  and don't get me started on South Carolina peaches. 


But I had an interesting experience this summer, that I really want to share with you all.  I was staying in Lusaka, Zambia, at a backpacker's hostel for about a month.  I made friends with the cook, and one night I decided that I was going to fix up a traditional southern-style meal.  So I made up a batch of cornmeal mush, and some greens with tomato and onion, and a bit of chicken.  And the cook was making a tradional Zambian meal, so we decided to exchange a bit of each.  And when we did, we realized....we'd make IDENTICAL meals.  Down to the last bit.  The flavors were almost just the same.  The only difference was that I had used yellow cornmeal and he'd used white. 

How 'bout that?  While the regional differences in cuisine are to be savored, it's easy to forget how much global exchange has always taken place.  One could chalk up the similarities in southern and african cuisine to the fact that southern food was invented largely by slaves brought from africa.  But the problem with that is that most of those people were Western African, while Zambia is Bantu.  Plus most of those ingredients are indigenous to the New World.  So how did all this similarity come about?  I'm totally intrigued by the phenomenon.....

And one last thing about American food.  A lot of people try to claim that there is no such thing as American food, or that it only comes down to hamburgers, hot dogs, pizza pie and coke.  But that's absurd.  Many of the world's food staples are indigenous to North America, things that were domesticated by Native Americans, whose culinary traditions are fundamental to American food today.  Every international cuisine that comes to the US is fused with this background.  Hence potatoes are essential to much European cooking, Italian cuisine demands tomatoes, Slavic food must have peppers, etc. etc.  What's fascinating is how each cuisine has developed differently here than it might have with no influence from the dazzling cultural milieu that is the US.... and how the US can't even be conceived of without simultaneously thinking of all these other influences....

Personally, I love living in a place where  I have access to such a shocking range of food options.  Some of them are a bit absurd (Eazy Cheeze, yes, ridiculous) but c'est la vie!  Better than a totally homogenous diet, IMHO.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Work is love made visible.
                            --Kahlil Gibran

Human salvation lies in the hands of the creatively maladjusted.           
                            --Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Threads you might like:
Pages: 1 ... 11 12 [13] 14 15 ... 42 Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
How to Create Text Effects in Photoshop
How to Create a Poster Advert in Photoshop
How to Use Layers in Photoshop
How to Create Easy Logos
How to Create 3D Logo Text in Photoshop
Latest Blog Articles
@Home This Weekend: Seed Packet Gifts
Cooking: Honey Month
September 19th - Talk Like a Pirate Day!

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.