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Topic: Tunisian Crochet - Anyone know how to make a perfect triangle or diamond shape??  (Read 2375 times)
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jizzymcfrizzy
« on: August 14, 2005 12:41:30 PM »

Hey all,

My first post and it's a question.  I have spent the last week trying to figure out how to make a triangle or diamond shape with a nice point in Tunisian crochet and I just can't do it.  Is it possible?  I'm determined not to be beaten by this conumdrum, but I have to ask for outside help with this one.  Undecided

Jizzy
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amie
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« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2005 06:11:27 AM »

Hi!

It's completely possible. Think about Tunisian in the same way you do regular crochet. What would you do in reg. crochet to make a triangle? You'd use decrease stitches! So, chain whatever amount you want (the width of the triangle will determine this) and make the first row a basic forward and pass.

Now, for every row beyond that, you're going to make a decrease in the first and second vertical bars. That'll be your first decrease. Do whatever tunisian stitch you're planning across the row (for example, tunisian simple stitch across) until you get to the last two stitches. Now, make another decrease stitch. The return row will be a basic return row.

Some factors that will affect the size of your triangle would be the width of that base row (of course!) and the stitch you choose to use. Actually, the stitch will affect the HEIGHT. Using a simple stitch will be smaller than let's say a corded stitch which add more height.

Hope that helps!
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jizzymcfrizzy
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2005 03:44:43 AM »

Hi Amie,

Thanks for such a detailed and helpful explanation.  So, in other words, you can't make a triangle starting from its narrowest point; you have to work out how wide you want it to be and then work from its widest point downwards?

That means the only way I can make a diamond shape would be to start with a triangle and then pick up stitches from its widest point and keep decreasing.

Hmmm... suddenly, regular crochet is beginning to appeal to me alot more because it's much easier to manipulate and shape your fabric. Tunisian Crochet seems limited and better suited to making stuff with straight edges.  I guess circles are a no-no unless you want to spend eons making them in sections.  I'm sure I can put what I've learnt about TC to good use anyway.

Thanks again, Amie.

Jizzy
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amie
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« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2005 03:56:50 AM »

You can, but it's harder and doesn't look as good (IMO). If you wanted to try it, you'd have to start with the first row being a single stitch and then each row afterwards, you'd have to increase at the beginning and end of each row.

Crochet designers tend to work patterns from their widest width, with the exception of things made from crochet in the round. The increase stitches have a tendancy to look smooshed in there, whereas decrease stitches will tend to look like they are more a part of the work. Also, you have to imagine what the last row will look like. In Tunisian, it tends to be more open-looking, especially if you're using a thicker yarn and a bigger hook. They aren't going to want that last row to be open-looking if they were making a triangle shape. THat's one good reason to start from the widest width; the last row would only be 1 stitch wde and you woudln't see the openess.

Tunisian is more like graph paper. Think of each square on the paper as a stitch (with some exception of course). Regular crochet is like an off-roading vehicle; you can go anywhere and do anything. It's also the same with knitting. Knitting is more grid-like than crochet. That's what makes each so unique. Knitter's (who appreciate crochet) always comment that you can do things with crochet that you can't with knitting. Pick up a knitting pattern and map it out and it'll look like a piece of graph paper.

Tunisian Crochet seems limited and better suited to making stuff with straight edges.  I guess circles are a no-no unless you want to spend eons making them in sections.  I'm sure I can put what I've learnt about TC to good use anyway.

I wouldn't say limited, just different. I find that with Tunisian, I can make stitches that look like knitting but are done a lot quicker (IF ONLY KNITTERS KNEW!), Also, I find that it works up quicker than regular crochet!

So, whatcha makin'? My guess is (what do you call'em)...those things the kids wear in their hair to tie their hair back....kerchief?
« Last Edit: August 16, 2005 04:01:28 AM by amie » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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