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Topic: Tree/Klee Tapestry  (Read 5974 times)
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amyshrugged
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« on: August 02, 2005 10:31:30 AM »

Well, sad to say, but I think this is the first completed project I have posted to Craftster.. I guess late is better than never, right?

This is my first tapestry... I made it in my fiber arts class last semester, but decided after it was done that I wanted to add the black fringe to the top also, and I actually just finished doing that last night.  It might need a little more, but it looks a lot better with the fringe on top, I think.

I am excited that weaving has its own board now -- and I'm really interested to hear some opinions on my piece.  The tree silhouette was taken from a photograph, and the background is based on a Paul Klee painting called "Ancient Sounds."  I wish the edges were straighter... actually it looks straighter in person, especially on the right side, lol.  I guess that's something most people have to work on at first. 

Anyway -- let me know what you think!



Thanks for looking.  Smiley
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chipper
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2005 11:15:22 AM »

absolutely beautiful!!!  i'm totally jealous of your abilities.  i weave simple over and under cause with my 3 kids running around, i can't seem to find the sanity for much more thinking Smiley    your piece definitely makes me want to try.  may have to try soon. 

please show us more of your work!
--chipper
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annalou
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« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2005 06:57:27 PM »

Ah, tapestry weaving, such an art of patience.  I like the tree silhouette, although I sometimes "lose" it when it goes against the darker squares.  Interestingly, the background squares remind me of Norwegian square weave.

What type of tapestry loom did you use?
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girlonjourney
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2005 07:13:26 PM »

How wonderful! You have inspired me. Did you use a pattern or how did you plan the design?
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amyshrugged
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« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2005 07:27:04 PM »

Chipper -- thanks for the comments!  It took me SO LONG to finish this piece... I wish I had logged my hours, because I'm sure it took me at least 40 to do.  I think I counted 47 different kinds of yarn -- the most time consuming part was switching colors so often (and re-doing the branches about a million times).   I can't imagine trying to weave with kids running around!  It was bad enough with a couple of male roommates. 

Annalou -- I used a lap loom that I built as part of the class... it was just a frame of wood with little nails hammered into the top and bottom, about 18 x 24".  What is Norwegian square weave?  Sounds interesting... not a stitch I've heard of before.  I just used plain weave for this, though I varied the number of warps I passed over and under a lot for the tree, to set it apart texturally from the squares.. it is really a lot nicer in person, you can see the different yarns in the tree, etc.  Ah well!  That's the drawback of being online. 

Wreathgirl -- thank you!  I am so glad other people like it!  Most people around here just think I'm crazy for having 'wasted' so much time on it.   I used a cartoon, which is what weavers call their sketched-out idea, I learned.  Smiley  The assignment was to model the design on a well-known piece, but incorporate something personal.  I found the painting I liked, a tree I liked, and put them together in Photoshop, then just kind of enlarged it bit by bit onto the loom as I went.  I will post it if I can find it, so you can see what I'm talking about...
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annalou
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« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2005 07:48:55 PM »

Your lap loom sounds just like the one I built and used.  For mine, I used a canvas stretcher--the frame that painters use for stretching canvases (normally the canvas stays attached to said frame).

Norwegian square weave:  a tapestry method, a form of plain weave.  The entire design is made of equal-sized blocks of color.  In other words, the cartoon is simply colored-in graph paper.  When changing colors, each color of the first & second rows go around the same warp thread.  For the third & fourth rows, shift over one warp thread.  For the fifth & sixth, shift back to the original warp thread.  Seventh & eighth, same as third & fourth.  Most commonly, this method of weaving made dense coverlets a la:
http://www.ericsongallery.com/T3_NorWeaving.htm
Feel free to ask for clarification . . .
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girlonjourney
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2005 05:46:05 AM »





Wreathgirl -- thank you!  I am so glad other people like it!  Most people around here just think I'm crazy for having 'wasted' so much time on it.   I used a cartoon, which is what weavers call their sketched-out idea, I learned.  Smiley  The assignment was to model the design on a well-known piece, but incorporate something personal.  I found the painting I liked, a tree I liked, and put them together in Photoshop, then just kind of enlarged it bit by bit onto the loom as I went.  I will post it if I can find it, so you can see what I'm talking about...

Oh It does not look like wasted time at all! That would be very cool if you could post the picture, I am amazed at how you can create something like that in a weaving. I have just started weaving, and it is so confusing to me! I have looked at books but I am still confused. I can do the basic stuff but that is about it. Are you going to sell your creation or keep it?
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amyshrugged
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« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2005 01:13:36 PM »

Oh It does not look like wasted time at all! That would be very cool if you could post the picture, I am amazed at how you can create something like that in a weaving. I have just started weaving, and it is so confusing to me! I have looked at books but I am still confused. I can do the basic stuff but that is about it. Are you going to sell your creation or keep it?

I don't think I'll sell it... I am pretty attached to it, hehe.  Also, it's far from perfect, and I don't know who'd really pay money for it.  I mean sure, it's nice, but for as long as it took me to finish... I don't know if it's worth the price I'd have to charge to make it worth my while to sell it.

I am kind of thinking of turning it into something, like a shoulder bag, but I don't know.. I will probably just put it on my wall, at least for a while.

Apparently I didn't save the picture I actually used, but I have the two components, so here they are....I just zoomed in on the part of the painting I wanted to use, superimposed the tree silhouette over it in Photoshop, printed it out as big as it would fit on the paper, then enlarged it bit by bit onto the loom as I went.  When I was getting started, I drew little marks on the warp strings with a sharpie marker to tell me where to insert the branches, but eventually it was taking longer to do that than to just wing it, so I quit.  

It was made on a little lap loom, so I just started at the bottom with the black part of the tree picture and worked my way up.  I didnt' actually use a graph, to do the enlarging, but it was the same concept.. I simplified things a little for the weaving (substituted colors, smoothed out some of the detail on the branches, etc.), but it still looks relatively like the pictures it was based on, I think:

     

Weaving diagrams have a tendency to be really confusing!  I learned mostly from my teacher, but there were a few stitches I wanted to learn that we didnt' go over in class, and it took me a lot of practice to muddle through those.

You don't HAVE to know fancy stitches though... This weaving was done with plain weave only -- just over this warp, under that one, over, under... forever!  The only variation I did was for the tree, I mixed it up (over two, under one, over three, under two, etc.) randomly to give it a different texture than the squares.  Time consuming, but not difficult in a way that you couldn't learn how.  Just keep trying!  And post some picturest! I'd love to see someone else's work!   Smiley
« Last Edit: February 05, 2010 07:49:16 AM by jungrrl - Reason: fixed picture(s) » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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amyshrugged
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« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2005 01:22:17 PM »

Your lap loom sounds just like the one I built and used.  For mine, I used a canvas stretcher--the frame that painters use for stretching canvases (normally the canvas stays attached to said frame).
Did you use nails for the warp strings, or did you just kind of loop/knot the warp string over the frame?  I was thinking of making another one without nails, so I can do larger-scale weavings on it.. the way mine is set up right now you need to use a fairly fine warp.. it's best for tapestry I guess, anything weft-faced.  Is your Norwegian square weave weft-faced also, or do the warps show through too?

When changing colors, each color of the first & second rows go around the same warp thread.  For the third & fourth rows, shift over one warp thread.  For the fifth & sixth, shift back to the original warp thread.  Seventh & eighth, same as third & fourth. 
Is this like a dovetail join?  That's what I did for the left and right edges of all the squares in my tapestry.. and it took forever!  In my mind, that's what I'm picturing from this description anyway.. but I could be way off. 

The patterning on the weaving you linked to is really beautiful.. thanks for posting that.
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annalou
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« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2005 02:02:54 PM »

Your lap loom sounds just like the one I built and used.  For mine, I used a canvas stretcher--the frame that painters use for stretching canvases (normally the canvas stays attached to said frame).
Did you use nails for the warp strings, or did you just kind of loop/knot the warp string over the frame?  I was thinking of making another one without nails, so I can do larger-scale weavings on it.. the way mine is set up right now you need to use a fairly fine warp.. it's best for tapestry I guess, anything weft-faced.  Is your Norwegian square weave weft-faced also, or do the warps show through too?
No nails, no notches, just wraped the warp around the frame and then wove in some dowels for tension and evening the warp.  The square weave is weft-faced (aka, very dense, time consuming, and warm for the original use in coverlets).  Also, since the square weave is a plain weave, the loom I created has a pick up stick for one shed and a heddle bar for the other shed--faster than weaving over & under yourself.

When changing colors, each color of the first & second rows go around the same warp thread.  For the third & fourth rows, shift over one warp thread.  For the fifth & sixth, shift back to the original warp thread.  Seventh & eighth, same as third & fourth. 
Is this like a dovetail join?  That's what I did for the left and right edges of all the squares in my tapestry.. and it took forever!  In my mind, that's what I'm picturing from this description anyway.. but I could be way off. 

The patterning on the weaving you linked to is really beautiful.. thanks for posting that.
The square weave does use dovetailing.  The difference (compared to regular tapestry) is that, since the entire design is made of blocks, you'll always be using the same warp strings for your dovetail.

Glad you enjoyed the link.  These coverlets are really amazing.
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