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Topic: Human Cheese ??!!  (Read 8602 times)
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frankierevolver
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« Reply #20 on: July 19, 2005 07:39:41 PM »

yay for disease passed through bodily fluids! Eugene hippies!!!!! (har har and Portland is SOoOoOoO much better  Roll Eyes    )    hehe
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McAuliflower
« Reply #21 on: July 19, 2005 08:50:38 PM »

used to squeeze his dogs milk into his coffee everyday and eventually his wifes milk too.

Whooa...doggie milk! I think that was a sign to go to the grocery store?

Here's a nice tidbit from the lovely Dan Savage:

Q: If one were to make cheese from human breast milk, what commercially available cheese would be its closest relation in taste and texture?
-SF


A: The overwhelming majority of commercially available cheeses are made from plain old cows' milk, which means that cheese production--what you do with the milk--and not the origin of the milk should be largely responsible for taste and texture.

To test this hypothesis, I called a cheese shop in San Francisco with the cringe-inducing name Say Cheese. "Taste depends on the shape of the cheese," said Joe, an employee at Say Cheese, "and the amount of time it's aged, what the cows are fed, what kind of bacteria you introduce into the milk." And texture? "The older a cheese is the harder it is, the younger a cheese, the creamier."

When I asked Joe to recommend a cheese that would come close to one made from human breast milk, he balked: "I've never tasted breast milk." Was he bottle-fed? "I don't remember." When pressed, Joe said he didn't think cheese made from human breast milk would taste very good. "Sheep, goats, and cows don't eat meat, they don't eat onions or garlic, they don't drink coffee. The flavor of human cheese would depend on what you were feeding your human. Considering our diets, human breast milk would probably taste pretty awful." Does Say Cheese stock human breast milk cheese? "No, we don't." Why not? "It's a disgusting idea, and no one makes it." But if it were available, would you? "I don't think so."

Looks like the way to find out what human breast milk cheese might taste like is to roll up our sleeves and make ourselves some. According to Dale Baumgartner, head cheese maker at the Tillamook Creamery in Oregon, "It takes 10 pounds of milk to make one pound of cheese." A dairy cow makes more than that in one day, but the average lactating woman needs almost four days to produce 10 pounds of milk, and that would be a problem: "When you're making cheese, it's really important to use fresh milk," especially if your milk is unpasteurized. So, you need to find four lactating women, or make just a little tiny bit of cheese.

When I asked Dale about making cheese from human breast milk, he said, "The department of health might have something to say about that." But is it possible? "You could probably do it, I don't see why not--provided you could get your hands on the milk."

If you can get your hands on some fresh human breast milk, here's a simple cheese recipe from the New England Cheesemaking Supply Company (www.cheesemaking.com): Take your milk, put it in a bowl, and add some rennet (an animal derivative that contains an enzyme called rennin), which will cause the solids in your milk to clump up into curds. Then drain off the liquid, and serve the solids. Voil! You're eating breast milk cheese!


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save your fork- there's pie! http://www.browniepointsblog.com
Kuolema Nox
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« Reply #22 on: July 20, 2005 08:21:40 AM »

It's an interesting idea. Strange how when we're babies, we're happy to drink breast milk, but now we're older, we think it's disgusting. Grin

Although I've seen something more disgusting... there was a cookery show on Channel 4 a while ago with some middle-class hippy guy with a double-barrelled name... I forget what he was called... anyway, he lived on some farm and had a bunch of hippy mates and he showed you how to cook things out of random things they'd dug up/shot/fished/found under the sofa etc.

In one episode, a woman had given birth and she got Hippy to help out with a party to celebrate.
Now, as you know, when someone gives birth, the baby is born, then the placenta comes out. Usually that gets incinerated.

Not this time.

Hippy made pt out of it.
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frankierevolver
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« Reply #23 on: July 20, 2005 09:43:10 AM »

In other countrys and such its more common for the woman to eat her own placenta.. and its also something that some women do (women you wouldnt expect) and serve it to guests at a party to celebrate the birth (informed guests, I might add). The thing about that which doesnt bother me is that its from your own body. Eating cheese from breasts you don't know is what is way too personal for me. I wouldn't drink milk from some dirty unknown hippies breast.. thats why its really disgusting to me.
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StephInTheCity
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« Reply #24 on: July 20, 2005 09:44:57 AM »

In one episode, a woman had given birth and she got Hippy to help out with a party to celebrate.
Now, as you know, when someone gives birth, the baby is born, then the placenta comes out. Usually that gets incinerated.

Not this time.

Hippy made pt out of it.

Ew.  But I have heard that placenta is good for your skin and hair (topical, not ingested).
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If I was any more open, I'd be inside out.
pamplemousse
« Reply #25 on: July 20, 2005 02:31:55 PM »

I've heard that eating your placenta helps to avoid post partum depression... I don't know where I heard that, or why on earth that would help (hormones?) so that's not very reliable.
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AnnaReilly
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« Reply #26 on: July 21, 2005 07:30:02 PM »

Ingesting the placenta (Placentophagia) can help shrink the uterus back down, prevent hemorrage, boost milk production and prevent post-partum depression because of the hormones. Aside from the new mother, those hormones can also help balance other women's menstrual or menopausal problems.
LINKS:
http://parentinghealth.com/modules/wfsection/article.php?articleid=13
http://thegreenman.net.au/mt/archives/001043.html

(And at the risk of further outing myself as a freak, I ate part of the placenta from my newest daughter's birth.)
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Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.
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lenagogan
« Reply #27 on: July 21, 2005 09:54:49 PM »

omg, what did it taste likeeeee?

I am so excited to know. Not that I'm having kids anytime soon/ever, but I think I would eat my own placenta because I am hardcore.
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AnnaReilly
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« Reply #28 on: July 22, 2005 09:37:46 AM »

Well I had a raw chunk blended up in a smoothie so I couldn't even taste it. Then I dried and ground the rest to be put into other foods (storing it in the freezer) and that tastes like really bland beef jerky.
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Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.
~Scott Adams
ladywyntir
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« Reply #29 on: July 22, 2005 10:26:58 AM »

wow... that's pretty cool anna ^_^  i don't know if i could eat my own placenta by itself, but putting it in other foods is common in many cultures.

as for the milk...
after breastfeeding is done, we're not supposed to drink milk anymore.  We are the only animals (besides domesticated ones) that drink milk after our early adolescent years.  Lactose intolerance is normal because we're supposed to stop making the enzyme that breaks down the sugar, lactose.  But, because we have the almighty dairy industry, some of the genes have mutated to help digest lactose after we've been weaned.

Article here
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