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Topic: Microwave Glass Kiln  (Read 510 times)
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GoldenSunshine
« on: March 17, 2014 11:53:19 AM »

I am brand new at this Fuseworks Microwave Kiln. And I am wondering why I have these several huge bubbles at the top of my piece, can anyone explain to me? What I did is, I made sure all my glass pieces were 90 COE, and I might remembered I mixed up Fuseworks glass and regular 90 COE glass that I got from the glass store, does that affect the product? It had everything in there were from the glass store, except the white broken pieces were from the kit that it came with the kiln. Help!  Smiley
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« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2014 05:28:49 PM »

Bubbles happen! They seem to be a function of glass placement in this case. Call it kiln magic.

If they are the result of mixed COE, your piece will crack. This does not appear to be a case of mixed COE.

If the bubbles are near the surface (if you can feel them dip down), then you need to break the tops of the bubbles (should be quite easy with a pointy stylus) and re-fire.
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GoldenSunshine
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2014 07:29:03 PM »

Bubbles happen! They seem to be a function of glass placement in this case. Call it kiln magic.

If they are the result of mixed COE, your piece will crack. This does not appear to be a case of mixed COE.

If the bubbles are near the surface (if you can feel them dip down), then you need to break the tops of the bubbles (should be quite easy with a pointy stylus) and re-fire.

Thanks! Just use a metal point object to pop if a bubble coming when I check the piece? 30 seconds help after popping the bubble? Also one more question, after this piece, I tried a black bottom with a triangle dichroic piece then a clear top. It came out looking weird, looks like the black steeped up and over the dichroic piece and changed colors. (photo if want to add)

I do this- 2 minutes on 50% power, then 1 on 70% power then I switch over to 100% power for 2 minutes, then every 30 seconds I check if it isn't done. Is that too much, or what is the ideal firing?
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« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2014 08:58:26 AM »

@GoldenSunshine: I can't help you with your microwave fusing schedule. But you should pop the bubbles before they go into the kiln while they are still cold.

I'd like to see a picture of the dichroic piece you mentioned. It is common for glass to move around while melting, sometimes up the sides of another piece. Black absorbs a lot of heat and moves much more than white does in the kiln.
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GoldenSunshine
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2014 09:43:17 AM »

@GoldenSunshine: I can't help you with your microwave fusing schedule. But you should pop the bubbles before they go into the kiln while they are still cold.

I'd like to see a picture of the dichroic piece you mentioned. It is common for glass to move around while melting, sometimes up the sides of another piece. Black absorbs a lot of heat and moves much more than white does in the kiln.

I didn't mean to ask about the microwave fusing schedule. I just was sharing my process. How do you pop bubbles when the glass is cold, the bubbles happens in between each microwave cycle? I'm confused.
Here's a photo of the strange dichroic piece.

I did a different one, but it is on top of black and clear glass. That came out better.
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« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2014 04:37:15 PM »

You just poke the little bubble with something sharp and metal to break the top of the bubble. When you re-fuse it, the bubble will fill in.

Dichroic glass can behave strangely sometimes. Kiln magic!
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speedingpullet
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2014 09:25:07 AM »

I find I get bubbles when I lay two flat sheets on top of each other without giving them a chance to vent air when fusing  Or when putting a flat sheet on top of a very textured piece of glass and trapping bubbles in the textures.

I've heard tell of a technique for helping the bubbles escape by placing small chips of clear at the corners of the piece (or at a regular interval around a circular piece). The theory being that as the top layer of glass softens, it will connect with the lower layer in the middle of the piece, and the edges - propped up by the clear chips - will be the last to connect and so the bubbles will escape from the edges. Personally, its not a technique that works for me very well but I thought I'd suggest it and as always YMMV ;-)

I have much better success with the following technique.
I'm not sure what kind of firing schedules you can get in a microwave oven, but for my kiln I have a 'bubble squeeze' time - where the glass is plastic enough to settle downwards and push bubbles out. Normally - depending on how big the piece is, or how crazy the textured surfaces - I'll soak the piece at 1250 for from 15 mins to 45 mins. Not too much longer, as at that temp you run the risk of devitrification more, so its a tossup between 'dirty' glass and glass full of bubbles. 0_o

And, failing that, as others have suggested, pop the bubbles and re-fuse. Depending on the size of the bubble, I sometimes add a little appropriately coloured grit chip in the hole to help the process along

Good luck! I hope you find a solution.
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