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Topic: Sculpey, Fimo, or Prémo... Which is best?  (Read 16459 times)
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Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #50 on: September 08, 2007 01:20:56 PM »

Thanks, glad to help! 

Quote
have you thought about putting together a book?


Yeah, but only briefly.  That wouldn't work for various reasons, but glassattic.com is my "book"(and free, at that Grin)... though with many areas that haven't been reworked they way I want, lotsa broken links, etc.


Diane B.
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POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
saraarts
« Reply #51 on: October 27, 2007 09:08:35 AM »

Ah, thank you.  This is exactly the information I have been looking for.  I do not have very hot hands, but I have very strong hands and a wide range of traditional sculpting tools but no kiln, just an ordinary oven.  So I want a polymer clay that will accept heavy sculpting and not go all soft and gooey on me when I work it.  I have only used Sculpey, and it becomes a sticky, limp mess in about five minutes in my hands, even after I've refrigerated it.  Shoot, cookie dough is easier to sculpt in my experience.

I think I'll have to try the Kato, unless you can recommend something even better.

Cheers!
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Diane B.
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« Reply #52 on: October 27, 2007 11:11:45 AM »

Quote
I'll have to try the Kato, unless you can recommend something even better.

Well, Kato Polyclay is definitely the "firmest" raw clay available nowadays (especially now that FimoClassic has gotten softer and softer) ... at least those polymer clays that come in colors.  I really don't know much about some of the other flesh-colored clays (besides SuperSculpey), but perhaps some of them would be suitable too?  Keep in mind though that lots of sculptors mix clays to get a mix that suits them in firmness and "smudgeability," etc., and sometimes they "leach" the softer clays to firm them up, and that some cool their hands and/or sculpts periodically to keep the clay firmer.

It would really probably be best for you to ask this question in some of the polymer sculpting groups since I'm not a sculptor and all I know is what I've gathered on that page. 
For names and links re some of those groups, go to this page: http://www.glassattic.com/polymer/sculpture.htm
...then click on the category called Online Discussion Groups.



Best of luck!

Diane B.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2007 11:13:19 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
saraarts
« Reply #53 on: October 27, 2007 02:32:14 PM »

Thanks, Diane!  Smiley
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PolymerJanna
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« Reply #54 on: October 28, 2007 06:14:56 AM »

when people call sculpey weak I have to wonder... It is the main one I have used since starting clay. I don't find it weak. Nothing that I have ever made out of it has broke. Why is it called weak?
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Diane B.
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« Reply #55 on: October 28, 2007 09:19:11 AM »

PolymerJanna, Sculpey is a "weak" clay because of its formulation and its proportion of ingredients.  Those things make it hard after baking, but brittle.  This shows up only in thin or projecting areas, and with stress, however.

In other words, if you make a rounded thick item with Sculpey, the weakness won't show up because rounded objects are inherently strong just because of their shape ...the bulk of the object protects it, and also there's nothing sticking out that could break off it that part were stressed. 
If you making something thin though, or something with projections, and then stress it by dropping or pressing on it (e.g., wearing it,  handling a lot, or putting on something that will itself bend like an Altoid tin, etc.), the weaker clays will snap or chip.  If those items are  handled with care though, then there would be no stress and no problem.   
Miniatures are sometimes protected too just because their projections are too small and hard to stress alone and/or projections may be fairly small... also using an acrylic finish or paint or liquid clay over a weak clay will strengthen the item because those materials are strong by themselves.

If you do the same things as above though with a "strong" clay, the baked items will not have as "hard" a surface, but will have flexibility and bounce which keeps them from breaking off or chipping (as long as the clays are properly baked).  So if you stress items made with stronger clays, they'll just bend or depress a tiny bit then bounce back, instead of breaking.

You can see this for yourself if you make thin strips of the various brands (or just do it with Sculpey) and bake them.  Then try to bend the strips... Sculpey will break, but the stronger ones will just bend and be hard to break even if twisted. 

Formulations have changed again lately so it's hard to keep up, but I assume the biggest problems are still with Sculpey, SuperSculpey, and Sculpey III, and that FimoSoft is stronger but not as strong as Premo, Kato and probably still FimoClassic.


HTH,

Diane B.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2007 09:34:51 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
PolymerJanna
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« Reply #56 on: October 28, 2007 09:22:21 AM »

ohhh thats what you meant! thanks! I'm too afraid to make thin items so I stear clear! LOL
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Diane B.
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GlassAttic --polymer clay "encyclopedia"


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« Reply #57 on: October 28, 2007 09:29:45 AM »

(I just added a bit more to my previous post, so you  might want to check it again.)

Also, many of your items are on the "thin" side, but not really thin, plus they have all kinds of thicknesses here and there and finishes/glues, so as long as they're handled reasonably carefully and not dropped on a hard surface, they should be okay most of the time.  Lots of clayers just don't want to take chances though and prefer a clay that's a little less mooshy so it handles better, but some also will  use Sculpey underneath a stronger clay just to get that extra "hardness" it gives --covering with a strong clay then makes the whole item strong.)


Diane B.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2007 09:32:26 AM by Diane B. » THIS ROCKS   Logged

POLYMER CLAY "ENCYCLOPEDIA" 
http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
few of my photos
http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/DianeBB
(had to move them from YahooPhotos, so many now without captions)
kimmy ann
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« Reply #58 on: November 15, 2007 06:09:42 PM »

Thank you for this fantastic analyzation of polymer clays. Despite my curiosity, I've never ventured outside the realm of Fimo Classic; it's great to finally know what to expect from all the offshoots.
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I blog, therefore I am.
sweetpetunia
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« Reply #59 on: June 01, 2010 07:08:40 PM »

Personally I LOVE sculpey, and HATE fimo!
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-Ashley


~ Amazingly helpful website!!: http://glassattic.com/polymer/contents.htm
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