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Topic: Completely Machine Stitched Binding Tutorial (pic heavy)  (Read 4132 times)
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MareMare
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« on: August 30, 2013 10:45:32 PM »

It's ok to machine bind. Or any other "rule breaking" quilting technique you want to do. It's ok. I used to be a bit ashamed that I don't hand bind, but I'm letting go of that. Smiley



My crafting philosophy is about how to get the most done with the least time/effort. I like short cuts. I'm ok with that. If I were to hand bind my quilts like you are "supposed to" I would have precisely 0 quilts completed, rather than dozens. I have come a long, long way in machine binding and have finally developed this method after tons of practice and experimenting.

This tutorial is going to assume nothing about your quilting skills, please excuse any simplicity in the interest of full clarity. And, actually, if you want to hand bind, just follow the tutorial up until the last step (and also attach your binding to the front, rather than the back).

Materials needed:

Quilt sandwich
2 1/2 inch strips of fabric to equal the perimeter of your quilt sandwich plus about 12 inches (more for seaming)
1/4 inch foot for your machine (not a total necessity, but it's nice!)
steaming iron

To start with we'll do a little math and cut our binding strips. My quilt sandwich for this project was 19 inches square. 19 x 4 =76
76 + 12 =88
WOF (width of fabric) is about 42-44, let's say error on the lower side and then say 41 after cutting the selvedge off. So, to hit 88 inches we'll need 2 strips of fabric. I went nuts and decided to do 2 1/2.

1.) Cut your fabric strips 2 1/2 inches wide. I fold my fabrics selvedge to selvedge, and then once again and slice off the end through 4 layers. You need to be careful doing this so it's not crooked, but it's another one of my shortcuts/something I don't do "exactly right."  Wink



2.) Once you have your strips, piece them together on a diagonal. A diagonal seam will help the bulk be spread out in the final binding, rather than all on top of each other making a thick spot that looks weird and is tough to sew over.

Lay 2 strips right side together perpendicularly to each other, and pin on both sides as in the picture. With a pencil and ruler, draw a diagonal line from corner to corner.



Using a standard foot, stitch along the line and cut off the excess fabric, leaving a 1/4 seam allowance or so.



Press the joining seams open.



3.) Press your binding. Fold in half, wrong sides together, and press, using some steam if you like (I like).

Yay, pretty binding!



4.) Now we'll attach it to the backside of your quilt sandwich. That's right, the back. Usually when binding you start on the front. Start by changing to your 1/4 inch foot, if using one.

Pin your binding to the back of the quilt sandwich. With one pin, it's the only pin we're going to use. Pick the middle or right side of any one side of your quilt sandwich and pin the binding. Leave about 6-8 inches of binding dangling, we'll use that later. The raw edge of your binding should align with the raw edge of your quilt sandwich.



5.) Begin to stitch, using a 1/4 inch seam. I use my 1/4 inch foot for this, again, because it's easy and consistent. Back stitch whenever you start and stop in the following directions. Stitch until you are 1/4 inch from the first corner.



Back stitch and pull the work out. You may cut the thread or let it dangle, whichever you prefer.

Now we are going to fold to create the mitered corners. Fold the binding to your right, creating a diagonal crease. Sadly my fingers are kind of in the way so you can't see the fold very well, but you can see the angle that I folded the binding.



Now, holding that first diagonal fold in place, fold the binding straight down, so it is now parallel with the next side we will be sewing.



Rotate your work as we are now sewing a new side and carefully ease the folded binding back into your machine. Starting at the very edge (not 1/4 inch in like when we stopped sewing), begin sewing and go ahead and back stitch.



6.) Continue stitching all sides and work each corner as described above. When you round the fourth corner*, stitch a couple of inches on the new side (the side you started on), back stitch, and remove from the machine. Now we are going to connect the binding beginning to the end.

*This is a small quilt, if you're working on a big one then maybe you want to stitch halfway down the side or more, usually having 1-2 feet of working space is ideal. More than that and your binding might be too loose, less than that and it's a nightmare to sew together.

7.) Usually we're told to overlap the ends of the binding as much as their original width. I've found that that makes my binding a little bit too loose, so I subtract 1/4 inch from that. Since we started with 2 1/2 inch wide binding, we want to overlap 2 1/4 inches. Lay a ruler on top of the dangling binding from the beginning (remember how we left a piece unstitched before our first and only pin?) and the piece you rounded the corner with. Overlap them 2 1/4 inches and cut off any tails. If you center this as well as you can it will be easier for the next step.



8.) Attach the ends of the binding together. (You might need to switch back to your regular foot for this step, I always do). To do this, you want to open up the binding and put the two pieces right sides together in the same perpendicular manner as we did earlier. The more room you have to do this, the easier, so if you have several inches of not stitched down binding on each side, all the better (this is why we left the binding dangling at the beginning and stopped stitching soon after we came around that final corner).



Pin, draw your diagonal line, and stitch as before. Before cutting your seam allowance however, be sure to fold the binding back together, just to make sure you've stitched correctly. I can't tell you how many times I stitched on the wrong diagonal or had the binding twisted. As long as you haven't cut off the excess seam allowance yet, it's not too hard to rip out your stitches and start again.





Ok, once you know you're good you can trim and iron the seam allowance, and then iron the seam in your binding fold again since it's probably a little messed up.

9.) Finish sewing the last side of your binding. Back Stitch. Yay, your binding is now attached and you have done a continuous binding! Go ahead and switch back to your regular foot, we're done with the 1/4 inch foot now.

10.) This step insures a crisp fold and an even amount of binding showing on the front side. Take the folded side of the binding and fold it again, a parallel fold, so that the original fold lines up on top of the raw edges. We're going to iron this on all four sides. Don't get too close to the corners, leave them alone for now.


 
11.) Go ahead and flip your quilt over to the right side. We're going to machine sew the binding to the front now, using the regular foot for your machine. I would advise changing to a color of thread that closely matches the color of your binding if you want it to blend in. I usually do so, but didn't this time. Starting in the middle of one side, fold the binding over to the right side of the quilt. The fold we just created with the iron will line up with the edge of the quilt and fit snugly.

12.) We're going to begin stitching slowly and very, very closely to the edge of the binding fold. If your machine has a speed regulator, I recommend slowing it down. Begin stitching 2 needle widths or so from the edge of the fold of the binding (maybe a millimeter? If you're very far away from the edge it will stick up and not look good). Only take 1 or 2 backstitches as you begin. Like I said, pins aren't needed. Just fold a few inches over at a time, going slowly, and stitch them down. The folded binding will easily cover the 1/4 inch stitch line we used attaching the binding.



13.) When you get a few inches away from the corner, fold and smooth the next side down a few inches from the corner (the binding that is currently horizontal to your machine). Use your finger to fold all the way to the corner. When you get to the corner, fold your current side (the side your are currently stitching) down. Hold the corner in place as you stitch to the corner. (the next 4 pictures probably show this better than words)









Stop with your needle down in the corner, raise your presser foot, and pivot the work beneath you. Sew the new sides, slowly and carefully until you get to the next corner and proceed as above. When you get back to your starting place, backstitch just two or three times. Carefully cut your thread ends. Do a little binding dance, because you're done, baby!



« Last Edit: October 10, 2013 11:33:45 PM by MareMare » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2013 07:24:41 AM »

very thorough, MareMare!
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« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2013 07:49:00 AM »

Fantastic fantastic tutorial\explanation. Wonderfully made. (So I can understand too) I also learned something...didn't know binding wasn't machine sewn. Bookmarked, definitely. Thank you Mare Mare!!!
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« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2013 10:36:48 AM »

Thanks! Jinjeet--it's typically sewn onto the front as I described, then folded over to the back and hand stitched with invisible stitches. I don't have the patience for that, and I don't think my hand stitched bindings are very strong/long lasting.
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« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2013 11:01:01 PM »

Thank You Mare Mare. I really don't like to sew by hand and am not very good at it so if there is an alternative, I'll use it gladly. Again, thanks for a great and extremely useful tute!
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« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2013 06:22:16 AM »

I think your explanation and pictures are very clear and will help a lot of people who love to make quilt tops but hate the binding part!

I have used this method for years and it seems to have held up well on the quilts!

Thanks for sharing...I am going to put this link up each time I see someone mention that they can't do binding! Grin
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« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2013 11:52:51 AM »

ok.....seriously... the parallel folded line with the iron is brilliant. THAT's where I could never machine bind, the seams on the front and back wouldn't line up on the front and back of the binding. The folded center...omg. I want to kiss you!   Kiss
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« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2013 12:11:57 PM »

ok.....seriously... the parallel folded line with the iron is brilliant. THAT's where I could never machine bind, the seams on the front and back wouldn't line up on the front and back of the binding. The folded center...omg. I want to kiss you!   Kiss

Yay! I kiss back! Cheesy
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« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2013 05:11:04 AM »

Great tutorial. I have made several quilt tops, sandwiched, and quilted but never did the binding. Last night I finished my first binding. I wish I had seen this post first. I machine sewed to the front and hand sewed the binding to the back. I don't feel my stitches will be as strong though. I will definitely go full machine binding next time. Your instructions and photos are very helpful.  Thank you for sharing.
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Renstar
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2013 06:07:04 AM »

I have just followed this and have to say THANK YOU Kiss.  This is an awesome tutorial and makes each step so simple.

My comments:
I found the attaching of the ends of the binding complicated, but I think that was just user confusion!!! Managed it in the end without twisting.

One other point, step 10 says Take the folded side of the binding and fold it again so that the original fold is perpendicular to the raw edges

I took this to mean parallel. Although it took a while for my brain to come to terms with it

Unfortunately, I cannot post a picture because it is part of the mini 12 days of Christmas swap.  I hope my partner likes it. It has been a massive learning curve for me. Glad it is complete. Cheesy
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« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2013 08:06:54 AM »

Thanks Renstar! Next time I am binding I will take more pics and try to clarify what I mean, those are good points and I appreciate the feedback. Smiley
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« Reply #11 on: September 15, 2013 03:18:52 PM »

No worries.

 One thing I forgot to mention that is really important; after finishing, I tidied up loose threads, went in to show OH, then flopped down exhausted. Checked the instructions to be sure I hadn't missed anything and eek - I had.

Had to get back up and do the happy binding dance. Then I was done  Grin
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« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2013 01:45:49 PM »

I just saw that stickerchic87 used this tutorial to do the binding on her fantastic bunny MAQ!  It looks fabulous!  Thanks again for posting...

Renstar--hope to see your quilt soon!
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« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2014 03:10:40 PM »

I'm just getting into quilting and want to thank you for the clear pics of mitring the corners! My first project was lumpy corners and I opted to make a circle as my second project to avoid those pesky corners! 
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« Reply #14 on: May 13, 2014 05:10:01 PM »

I hope it helps! Smiley
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« Reply #15 on: May 14, 2014 12:49:12 PM »

I machine bind & I'm not ashamed.   Grin  I did hand bind that MAQ I did, but only because I accidentally cut my binding strips too narrow & I had to work them to fit.  And it was small.   Wink  Maybe someday when I'm retired I'll hand bind...although my eyesight will probably be gone by then so I doubt it.

I also use a serger on the edges before I bind them so things stay where they are supposed to.  Shh - don't tell!
« Last Edit: May 14, 2014 12:50:44 PM by donniesgirl » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2014 12:51:07 PM »

I told someone I machine bind the other day and she gave me the snootiest, most disgusted and shocked look. She can suck it!
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« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2014 12:55:26 PM »

My quilt shop had a tour going on when I was longarming that wonky baby quilt and I had used brown Crayola washable markers to match the slashes and circles up.  Two women came in whispering and looked at me like I'd broken some cardinal quilting rule since I longarmed it before washing them out.  They can suck it too!  

Oh and as you can see from the pics I posted, it all washed out.  I suppose there is some technical super official way I should have marked them...but chalk wouldn't have shown up real well on the textured grey & I hate those rotary cutters with tracing paper.  I am all for shortcuts too!
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« Reply #18 on: May 15, 2014 08:12:15 AM »

I also use a serger on the edges before I bind them so things stay where they are supposed to.  Shh - don't tell!

Now that is a bloody good idea! Thank you for letting me in on your guilty secret  Wink
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« Reply #19 on: May 15, 2014 08:15:59 AM »

I think there are preferences, but no RIGHT way...whatever works...

I am also "guilty" of machine binding, spray adhesive layering, serging the edges (ha ha), and marking with pencil, chalk, whatever shows up!

I am not entering my quilts into any contests so I feel these shortcuts allow me to make more quilts for family and friends to enjoy! Grin
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Padester
« Reply #20 on: May 16, 2014 10:43:40 AM »

Ataching to the back first!!!  So obvious but yet I never tought to do that!  That will make my quilts soooo much nicer-looknig!  I have done the machine-binding, as well, but always joined it to the front first - then I would miss some of the binding on the back, or have to have TOO much overlap so that it doesn't look great - this is fabulous!  Thanks!  Smiley
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