A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
News 05/06/14: Craftster has gone mobile!  Read the big news here!
Total Members: 297,050
Currently Running With Scissors:
515 Guests and 24 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1]
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: I'm calling it - "the horrible sea monster"-soap.  (Read 1226 times)
Tags for this thread: hp_soap , hot_process_soap  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
LizzyEU
« on: August 03, 2013 06:35:19 AM »

First batch of cooked soap. I was heating it for a few hours in a pan au-bain-marie in another pan. Then removed the soap and left the pan for a bit. Then I had fun for about 2 hours trying to remove the one pan from the other: they vacuum-locked to one another. Eventually I managed.  Roll Eyes

50 grams of shea nut oil, 150 grams of coconut oil (the previous two: tried to make shaving cream according to a website recipe but apparently there are two kinds of coconut oil: the kind that melts at room temperatures and the kind that doesn't; mine melted hopelessly so I wanted to re-use the oil) 500 grams of soy oil and 100 grams of peanut oil, plus some essential oils and colorant at 8% leftover fats (deliberately didn't mix it through, wanted it to be spikey; didn't want it to be crumbly though! I don't know what happened - maybe I cooked it for too long, maybe it needed more water? The foam is watery, bubbly - not so much creamy. Fairly conditioning for the skin though.


« Last Edit: August 03, 2013 06:37:44 AM by LizzyEU » THIS ROCKS   Logged
tcmatteson
Offline Offline

Posts: 1586
Joined: 11-Jun-2009

Baby it's cold outside...


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2013 08:56:43 AM »

I think it turned out nice Smiley I have yet to make a truly successful hot process batch... I think it's just something you have to practice at to read when the soap is ready to mold to get those smoother pours that others seem to get! But hooray for trying something new and creating something awesome for your skin Smiley
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Crafter turned Soaper
Been away from Craftster for far too long Sad I miss this crafty community!
Simple & Clean Soapery on FB
Simple & Clean Soapery on etsy
LizzyEU
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2013 08:00:17 AM »

Thanks for the encouragement. My friends thought they were mouldy meatballs...  Shocked
THIS ROCKS   Logged
MareMare
Global Moderator
Guest Blogger
Bath and Beauty Moderator

Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Soapmakers do it with bubbles
Offline Offline

Posts: 18520
Joined: 25-Apr-2007

Don't be a soap licker


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2013 09:40:31 PM »

If it's crumbly then it probably was too long of a cook, but yay for completed soap! And as long as it works and isn't lye heavy then you're good! Smiley

Yeah I generally buy Coconut oil 76 (melts at 76* F), but have also used Coconut 92, it makes a harder bar of soap but is harder to work with. And I think there might be another kind with an even higher melting point.

Coconut tends to make bigger bubbles, if you try adding some olive oil next time too, that's where you can get the creamy, smaller lather from.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2013 09:42:42 PM by MareMare » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Soaps by MareMare Blog Updated! 8/13

~Calling all Quilters! It's time to join the 2014 Quiltalong!~

Love painting your nails? Check out the Awesome Manicure Thread!
LizzyEU
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2013 01:53:07 PM »

If it's crumbly then it probably was too long of a cook, but yay for completed soap! And as long as it works and isn't lye heavy then you're good! Smiley

Yeah I generally buy Coconut oil 76 (melts at 76* F), but have also used Coconut 92, it makes a harder bar of soap but is harder to work with. And I think there might be another kind with an even higher melting point.

Coconut tends to make bigger bubbles, if you try adding some olive oil next time too, that's where you can get the creamy, smaller lather from.

Ahhh thanks for that clarification. My previous experience was castille (cold-method) so that explains my expectation of foamy lather from real soap I guess. I'll try to cook it less next time, though I only boiled it until the stingy smell was gone and it didn't look like jell-o. Maybe it's the size of the pan and the amount made? I had a very big pan and not a lot of the soap in there, only a thin layer on the bottom.

Oh and to clarify: I meant I didn't mix through the dye and surplus oils for the smell that I put in (only stirred it for a bit, no mixer). Obviously I had to mix the lye with the fats with a blender.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2013 01:57:10 PM by LizzyEU » THIS ROCKS   Logged
Krissy.me
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2013 07:40:49 AM »

One thing that will help the pour of hot process soap is to add a bit more liquid than the recipe calls for.  Also adding BOTH sodium lactate and sugar to the recipe will help a smoother pour as well.   Personally unless your dealing with a fussy FO, your better to CP the soap.   There isn't much different between the two when you look at the overall process and saponification.

To get a nicer looking soap with HP you need to add a bit more liquid than you normally add and with CP the saponification process is completed within 12 hours or less.  So the cure time for the CP is the extra time that allows the extra liquid to evaporate out.  The same will apply to the HP because you added extra liquid to get a nice and smoother pour.  If done right your HP can look just like CP........


IMHO when it comes to making a good shaving soap either you need to spend a LOT of time formulating and learning from your mistakes, but most people don't really know what shaving soap is supposed to behave like so I just recommend buying the BrambleBerry shaving soap base.  It's quite popular and pretty natural overall and easy to work with.  There are some well known ladies who's business revolve around this product.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

I make soap and other "cosmetics" as defined by the FDA and in my spare time I sew.... Sewing is therapy for me in dealing with life stresses and my chronic pain.  When I hurt and can't sew, I plan what I want to sew.  I also have a great husband, three kids and three fur kids.....
MareMare
Global Moderator
Guest Blogger
Bath and Beauty Moderator

Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Soapmakers do it with bubbles
Offline Offline

Posts: 18520
Joined: 25-Apr-2007

Don't be a soap licker


View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2013 01:15:52 PM »

One thing that will help the pour of hot process soap is to add a bit more liquid than the recipe calls for.  Also adding BOTH sodium lactate and sugar to the recipe will help a smoother pour as well.   Personally unless your dealing with a fussy FO, your better to CP the soap.   There isn't much different between the two when you look at the overall process and saponification.

To get a nicer looking soap with HP you need to add a bit more liquid than you normally add and with CP the saponification process is completed within 12 hours or less.  So the cure time for the CP is the extra time that allows the extra liquid to evaporate out.  The same will apply to the HP because you added extra liquid to get a nice and smoother pour.  If done right your HP can look just like CP........


IMHO when it comes to making a good shaving soap either you need to spend a LOT of time formulating and learning from your mistakes, but most people don't really know what shaving soap is supposed to behave like so I just recommend buying the BrambleBerry shaving soap base.  It's quite popular and pretty natural overall and easy to work with.  There are some well known ladies who's business revolve around this product.

Ooh, It's great to have someone familiar with HP around! Thanks for the tips, Krissy!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Soaps by MareMare Blog Updated! 8/13

~Calling all Quilters! It's time to join the 2014 Quiltalong!~

Love painting your nails? Check out the Awesome Manicure Thread!
Krissy.me
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2013 02:49:16 PM »

I'm glad to help out!  I know a fair bit and then some about making soap...
HP is one technique that I believe is a bit misunderstood.   

I rarely HP soap but even when I make RTCP I add 3% PPO Sodium Lactate AND 4% PPO regular white table sugar into my recipe.  I add the sodium lactate in with my lye solution but the sugar I add with my additional liquids as I use 50/50 lye solution that is pre-made.   Most of my soaps are milk soaps using powdered milk so I can figure the amount of powdered milk (goats, coconut or whole cows) to be used to be the same if all the liquid in the soap was the milk.  But it's just divided up a little bit.

Even if you don't have sodium lactate just adding the sugar will make a difference with HP soap in how smoothly it pours.  Adding a little extra liquid will be a definite bonus to a more fluid pour of the soap.  If you want to color your HP this is an extra bonus.

THIS ROCKS   Logged

I make soap and other "cosmetics" as defined by the FDA and in my spare time I sew.... Sewing is therapy for me in dealing with life stresses and my chronic pain.  When I hurt and can't sew, I plan what I want to sew.  I also have a great husband, three kids and three fur kids.....
HSG
Global Moderator
Glass Crafts Moderator
Guest Blogger

Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Oy Vey!
Offline Offline

Posts: 10082
Joined: 18-Aug-2006

Margaritas & Facial Masks


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2013 07:00:12 AM »

Lots of great information in this thread. Thank you ladies for sharing!

The soap looks cool and I would totally try it! Moldy meatball look and all. Cheesy
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Get the Perfect Flush for Medium Complexions
Learn How to Apply Ombre Eye Makeup
Beauty Quickie: How to Remove Nail Polish
Revenge of the Nerds: Makeup Lessons for Gals With Glasses
Beauty Test Lab: Glove Treatment
Latest Blog Articles
August 20, 2014 Featured Projects
Tute Tuesday: Faux Cross Stitch Sweatshirt
More Great Crafts Using Cardboard Tubes

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.