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Topic: What you need to know to screen print (General Info. and Tutorial)  (Read 44067 times)
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printcutsew
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« Reply #30 on: January 22, 2009 06:58:22 AM »

Hi everyone,
This is a great thread! Lots of fabulous information. Happy printing!
« Last Edit: April 12, 2013 12:40:40 PM by jungrrl - Reason: edited to comply with Craftster guidelines » THIS ROCKS   Logged

TwistMySister
« Reply #31 on: February 17, 2009 06:24:26 PM »

^^ thanks! what a good thought : )

i have some questions.... surprise surprise!  Roll Eyes

how do you apply the acetate stencil to the mesh screen? what are you letting dry??

does it need to be a "Stencil" or can it be a photographic image where lines are broken?

how do you "expose" the image? 

what does "The print out should be face up and directly in contact with the stencil on the flat side of the screen."  mean? do you have any pictures of this??


thanks alot!! xo
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printcutsew
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« Reply #32 on: February 18, 2009 03:05:14 AM »

^^ thanks! what a good thought : )

i have some questions.... surprise surprise!  Roll Eyes

how do you apply the acetate stencil to the mesh screen? what are you letting dry??

does it need to be a "Stencil" or can it be a photographic image where lines are broken?

how do you "expose" the image? 

what does "The print out should be face up and directly in contact with the stencil on the flat side of the screen."  mean? do you have any pictures of this??


thanks alot!! xo
I think you need to run through the basics- read my terms and definitions blog post and then
read through my silkscreen 101 series
http://www.printcutsew.com/category/terms-and-definitions/
http://www.printcutsew.com/549/screen-printing-101-part-1-getting-started/
Hope this helps
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TwistMySister
« Reply #33 on: March 05, 2009 01:00:25 AM »

thanks alot!! i have done screen printing before, but we used the actual big ass machine to burn the image onto the screen. i have no idea how to DIY it without a proper vacuum type machine thingy.  Huh
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printcutsew
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« Reply #34 on: April 01, 2009 01:00:35 PM »

I have a free ebook on my blog called "SCREEN PRINT: The Ultimate Guide" that anyone can download- it's great for beginners and even for intermediate printers. Hope it helps. Smiley

I was reading some threads and it seems like lots of people have lots of questions about screen printing and are kinda hazy about the whole process and what you need and don't need.  So, I'll try to clarify some things.  I'm currently in the last week of my Screen Printing class at CMSU (I have an A in the class, so don't worry that I'm just some tard college student), so I think that I should be able to cover the basics and answer any questions. Onward to the actual information!!

I. What you need:
      A.  Frame
      B.  Mesh
      C.  Stencil
      D.  Ink
      E.  Squeegee

Elaboration on these things:

A. Frames:  There are 2 types, Rigid and Retensionable. 
         1.  Rigid frames can be bought with mesh all ready attached to them.  These type are best for at home printing because they already have the proper tension and you won't have to buy the mesh separately.  After some heavy use they will lose tension, which is a bad thing but no big deal because you probably wont be using them all day everyday and they are fairly cheap.
         2.  Retensionable frames are not what you want.  They may be called Newman Roller Frames.

B. Mesh:  When you buy a rigid frame, you are going to want to know what type of mesh is on it. Also, if you are going all gung ho about it and stapling fabric to wooden frames, this section should help you decide what to use.
   1. Fabric Types
            a.   Silk is never used. Ever.  Don't even think about it. It won't look good.
            b.   Nylon is rarely used by businesses except for on contoured substrates (like beer bottles, golf balls, you know, roundish stuff)  However, I have seen it used by some crafty folks and from the results, my guess is that it isn't holding super nice detail.  But it can be done!
            c.   Polyester is the weapon of choice for businesses (like 95% of screen printing uses this).  Now, this doesn't mean you can go grab that pea green sports jacket from the seventies, staple it to the frame and actually have it work.  The mesh is woven to be, well, meshlike.
        2.  But wait there is more to mesh!
Different types of printing use different threads per inch(that is the random seeming number that is somewhere in the title of what you are getting). Here are the usual number ranges and what you can print with each:
           a.  60 to 80- Glitter inks, doesn't hold detail at all.  Seriously, no detail.
           b.  110 to 155- T-shirts, holds pretty good detail. Could probably print on paper and stuff. This is probably what you want.
           c.  180- Used for underbases on dark shirts and tightly woven fabric.
           d.  230- Uncoated paper, plexiglass
           e.  Anything above those- You don't need 'em.  You probably won't need anything above a 155 unless you are printing on something that doesnt absorb ink very well.

C. Stencil(Emulsion):  You have several different choices with these.
        1.  Direct emulsions is a liquid that you coat both sides of the screen with. There are two types, go with Diazo. This type is pretty cheap.
      2.  Capillary comes in sheets that are fast and fabu to apply to the screen (these are my favorite).  They are more expensive but easier and more consistent to use.
      3.  Magical at home glue concotions look like they work okay, but seem like a pain in the ass.  Also, Im thinking that these arent going to hold detail worth a.something that isnt good.  So, if you are wanting some good detail and ease of use, go with #1 or 2.

D. Ink:  There are a couple different types for different job.
      1.  Plastisol is used for t-shirts, stuff you wear.  To dry it you have to heat it up to at least 320 F, otherwise it will wash off and you will be sad and cry.
      2.  Enamel is used for cards and paper stuff.  It is water based so itll dry all by itself if you just leave it out. 
      3. House Paint is used for concert poster that dude print in their basement. It is good priced and comes in lots of colors. I wouldn't use this on and shirts or anything.
     4.  Other stuff-  Ive seen that use guys are using other things like Speedball and what not.  I dont know what these are or how well they work.  The main thing I would be worried about is there durability when you are washing them.

E. Squeegee:  This is pretty basic.
      1.  Uh, just go buy a cheap one with an end that is shaped like a rectangle and youll be fine.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Okay!  I hope I didnt wear you guys out with all that information.  I tried to sparse it down to just what you need to know to print at home.  (I could have gone on and on about squeegee durometer and shore A, but you dont need to know that crap.  Hell, I doubt I even need to know it.)  Hopefully this is useful information and will help you kids figure out what you want to use.


Next time on Cassandra Rambles About Screen Printing:  How to get ready to print!!

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Transatlanticism
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« Reply #35 on: January 26, 2010 02:44:49 PM »

Please help I'm a struggling first-timer!

I'm using the screen filler method (it's reddish) and screen printing ink I got at the art store. I'm doing a shirt and it didn't occur to me to get some other kind of paint I didn't know it mattered? After doing several tests I printed, not using wood between,  which came out well, I printed only to have a print that looked stripey. Instead of ink on all my places I wanted it it looked like zebra print, it just wasn't in some spots. What am I doing wrong and how do I fix it?

Thanks!!
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« Reply #36 on: March 02, 2010 04:27:27 PM »

I would appreciate some help here!  Undecided

Ok, someone told me that for fabric it is best to use a 10xx or something else xx (multifilament or something like that)   Huh Thats the only time Ive heard about it, so should I use the _xx or the regular numbers mesh (110-155)?? Also, for a VERY detailed image, which screen shoud be used if I would like to use a stencil instead of photo emulsion??

Thanks for your time!!
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