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Topic: Circle Skirt Math... HELP!!!  (Read 844 times)
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ILoveColor88
« on: May 20, 2013 08:51:27 PM »

HELP!!!! Circle Skirt math is hurting my brain! I totally thought I got it, until I made my first skirt and it came out a little too small Sad

I have been using these two tutorials as references..

http://byhandlondon.com/2012/09/06/circle-skirt-maths-explained/

and this one...

http://www.ficklesense.com/2011/09/how-to-make-circle-skirt-full-34-12-14.html#comment-form

In the first one, she says that 72/3.14= 30... And when I do it, I get 22.92.

And in the second one, she doesn't seem to incorporate side seam allowances.


So basically I'm just wondering what the correct pattern for a circle skirt is... This is what I understand it to be when making a full circle skirt from two halves (so two side seams).

You take your waist circumference (27 inches in my case) and add your side seam allowances. I use 5/8ths so I would add 2.5 inches.

27 + 2.5 = 29.5 inches

Then I would divide that by Pi (3.14) to get the diameter.

29.5 / 3.14 = 9.39

Then I would divide that by 2 to get the radius.

9.39 / 2 = 4.69

And finally, I subtract 0.625 inches for the waist band seam allowance.

4.69 - 0.625 = 4.06

So ultimately, my radius is 4.06. And I would make a quarter of a circle pattern and cut it out on the fold to give me half a circle.

So is this right or am I totally missing something here??

All help is GREATLY appreciated!

 
« Last Edit: May 20, 2013 09:01:06 PM by ILoveColor88 » THIS ROCKS   Logged
RaraAvis
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« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2013 10:25:41 AM »

I didn't check through all your math, but about the side seams....what sort of material are you using? If you are making a complete circle you would not have side seams if you cut it from one large piece of fabric. If you are using a woven material you may want a side seam for a zipper. If you are using a knit, you probably will not need a side seam.

Here is another tutorial that I think might be easier to follow...
http://whatthecraft.com/circle-skirt-tutorial-new-and-improved/
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AlenaSelene
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2013 03:41:35 PM »

Here's how I make circle belly dance skirts. I've used this method since the early 80s.

First, decide how long you want the skirt to be, then add 4 inches. That is the radius of the circle you will cut. In other words, if the finished length is 34", the raw circle to cut is 38" radius (96 diameter)

Because I make them to sit on hips, you might want to add an extra inch or two.

I cut my skirts in 1/2 circle panels. Then, I fold them in half into quarters, making a pie shaped wedge. For a hip band, I measure 4" down from the tip. For a waist band, I suggest cutting only 1" off to start.

Now, open the panel up. If the cutout for the waist band is too small, fold it back up and cut again.

I prefer to use bias tape to make a casing for an elastic waistband, so I have some wiggle room for minor errors.

I use a narrow hem.

I like this tutorial
http://www.shira.net/costuming/skirt-circle.htm
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AlenaSelene
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2013 03:43:08 PM »

Oh, ps, because a circle skirt is cut on the bias, I suggest wetting the skirt, then let it hang to dry. The hem will stretch and warp, trim it then hem it.

If you hem a bias skirt without allowing it time to hang and stretch, it will stretch after it's hemed.
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okenzy
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2014 04:50:45 PM »

I know the original post is a little old but this may still help.  Here is a link to a circle skirt pattern calculator/generator where you don't have to see the math much less do it.  There is a low cost, but worth it I think for no math and it includes a lot of stuff to customize.

http://www.biggurlcloz.com/any-size-circle-skirt-pattern-calculator/
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