A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: Do you know about all of these Craftster features?
Total Members: 300,948
Currently Running With Scissors:
732 Guests and 11 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1] 2 3 4  All
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Tutorial: Duct Tape Image Transfers (InkJet)  (Read 8929 times)
Tags for this thread: image_transfer , duct_tape , tutorial , duct_tape_crafts  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
microjivvy
« on: October 17, 2012 02:43:29 AM »



If you’re sitting around puzzling about the basic premise behind image transfers using a InkrJet printer (and, wow, who isn’t), let me put your mind to rest: it’s all about “floating” ink on a non-porous/semi-porous surface and then using some sort of burnisher to transfer that floating ink to a porous surface where it will sink in and dry, effectively “staining” the porous surface.

If you've read my blog, you know I’ve had my issues with image transfers, so when I was working on yet another project requiring a transfer, I decided that until I found a quick and easy transfer method, I would not rest.

Which is, of course, when I realized that the answer to my puzzling was the familiar and comfortable answer to so many of my puzzlings: duct tape.

This realization led me to experiment with a wide variety of tapes (two types of duct tape, clear packing tape, tan packing tape, blue painter’s tape, white artist’s tape), and, frankly, all of them work to a certain degree.

Any of them would do in a pinch. Okay, not the white artist’s tape, but all of the others.

After way too much experimentation, there were three tapes closely ranked as the top performers: 1) Standard Silver Duct Tape (I happened to use 3M brand), 2) Nashua brand Transparent Duct Tape, and 3) Blue Painter’s Tape. These three tapes had the least amount of problem with the ink “beading up” and causing blotches in the transferred image.

The #1 limitation to image transfer by tape is the width of the tape. If you butt strips of the tape together, you end up with tiny strips of no ink (at the butting). If you overlap the tape, too much (and even a little might be too much — this is highly dependent on the image), you end up with hills and valleys of ink making an extra dark or light strip.

Which may be why the blue painter’s tape did not win in this experiment — it works extremely well, but I only had a very narrow roll and quickly became irritated by the inability to print even a small image without attempting to compensate for the “hills and valleys”.

Besides, duct tape is inherently cooler than painter’s tape.

SUPPLIES and INSTRUCTIONS


- InkJet Printer
 - Ordinary Printer Paper
 - Image to be transferred
 - Duct Tape
 - Burnisher (for the most part, I used a wooden tool designed for sculpting clay, but a wooden clothes pin, a credit card, and an acrylic roller also worked)



STEP 1: Print the image(s) you wish to transfer. This gives you a guide for placing the tape and will help with lining up the image when you wish to transfer it to a new surface.

STEP 2: Cover the image with duct tape.

STEP 3: Print the image(s) again, this time on the duct tape covered paper. At this point, I’m compelled to offer two bits of advice and a caution: 1) always leave a border of plain paper (no duct tape) on all edges (particularly the lead edge that feeds into the printer; 2) before placing the duct tape covered sheet of paper in the printer, remove all other paper from the loading bay — this prevents the duct tape (even the non-sticky side) from “grabbing” the paper below it; and 3) Odds are that all InkJet printer manufacturers recommend against running duct tape through your printer… do so at your own risk.



STEP 4: Place the printout, duct tape side down, on the surface you wish to transfer to — in this case, orange and white checked cotton fabric. Hold the paper down with one hand and rub the back of the image with a burnisher of some fashion.

That’s all there is to it. Here are some examples of duct tape image transfers:



Overall, I was extremely satisfied with the duct tape as a quick and easy way to get digital images onto fabric as a pattern for embroidery, needle felting, fabric paints, etc. Sometimes, as with the pumpkin images on the wool blend felt, image adjustments are needed for a solid transfer (in this case, thicker lines).







While both the silver and Nashua transparent duct tape worked well, the transparent tape repeatedly edged out the silver for transferring small details in photographs.



I’m pretty happy with this quick and easy transfer method — after all, who isn’t happy when using duct tape?

All right, one last transfer image:



Now if I could just suss out a way to use WD-40 for image transfers…
« Last Edit: October 18, 2012 12:33:26 PM by microjivvy » THIS ROCKS   Logged

MicroJivvy.com:  Whatever I happen to be working on.
My Pinterest
Jinjeet Phoenix
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 2958
Joined: 13-Feb-2008

View Profile available for personal swaps
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2012 04:51:25 AM »

Thank you so much for sharing your experience!!! This is so bookmarked for future use. Thank You MicroJivvy!
THIS ROCKS   Logged
loves2experiment
Swap Moderator
Image Reproduction Techniques Moderator

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Irreverent. Indomitable. Incorrigible.
Offline Offline

Posts: 9205
Joined: 09-Aug-2005


View Profile available for personal swaps
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2012 05:13:21 AM »

awesome sauce!  thanks so much for sharing this...i'm adding it to my list of things to try Cheesy
THIS ROCKS   Logged

...loves to experiment...not a monogamous crafter...

STS Winter Market 2014
bunny1kenobi
Ruler of the Roost, Protector of the Progeny, Conqueror of Comestibles, Chieftain of Chores, Consort Extraordinaire, and Crafty to Boot!
Offline Offline

Posts: 4743
Joined: 04-Oct-2011

Best of 2013 Winner! I like my avatar, tho....


View Profile available for personal swaps
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2012 05:48:35 AM »

Thank you! I'm going to pin this!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Dr. Craft
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2012 05:57:29 AM »

Fabulous job of explanation. It's great that you clearly explain the "why" in addition to the "what". Thanks so much. I'm definitely going to try. By the way, while in the store a few days ago, I noticed duct tape is now producing sheets (they look close to standard paper size).
As well, have you ever tried using the transparency blanks that used to be used for overhead projectors? Those are made to go through printers and are less porous than paper.
THIS ROCKS   Logged
thisbirdsabsurd
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 2915
Joined: 16-Sep-2008

Be Happy!


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2012 06:23:29 AM »

This will totally come in handy!  Thanks for the info!!
THIS ROCKS   Logged

My Etsy shop is here!  www.thisbirdsabsurd.etsy.com
fancybutch
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 1603
Joined: 11-Dec-2011


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2012 06:37:46 AM »

hey thanks for this great tutorial!  I have also been a bit obsessed with image transfer lately, learning to use gel medium to do it, mostly onto painted layers.

I can't believe how great these look.  I don't have a printer at home and think it might be too dangerous to try putting odd things through the work printer lol.  But I have seen the sheets of duct tape which should work, and those feel a little less crazy to run through a printer.  Must try.

Can't wait to see more projects from you using this method!

THIS ROCKS   Logged

"I reserve my right to be complex." Leslie Feinberg
microjivvy
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2012 07:10:40 AM »

duct tape in sheets!  I had no idea. A quick pop around the net and they look a bit pricey ($1-$2 per sheet), but for some projects, it would be absolutely worth it.

@DrCraft: I have not used the image transparency sheets, but being inspired by that method, I tried running a sheet of "shrinky dink" plastic through the printer.  I got some decent results, but the ink really is prone to "beading up" and I had a tough time getting consistently decent results.

THIS ROCKS   Logged

MicroJivvy.com:  Whatever I happen to be working on.
My Pinterest
rackycoo
Global Moderator
Swap Moderator
Paper Crafts, Scrapbooking, and ATCs Moderator

Tutorial Contributor

Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Member of the Papercraft Gang
Offline Offline

Posts: 27300
Joined: 01-Apr-2005

"Best of 2013" Winner; too lazy to change avatar.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2012 07:47:46 AM »

What a great tutorial! Thanks so much for the info. I just had to share this on Craftster's Facebook page. Smiley
THIS ROCKS   Logged

Check out my Etsy shop. Scary Toys and Halloween for everyone!
My blog: junk&stuff
Pinterest
BirdBones
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Offline Offline

Posts: 1619
Joined: 23-Mar-2011


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2012 09:59:18 AM »

Wow! This is both intruiging and extremely useful! And something even european me can try Grin Oh, can't wait for the weekend to give this a go....
Thank you for putting so much effort into the description and instructions!

You just rock Grin
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] 2 3 4  All Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



FacebookTwitterPinterest
only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Edible Hanukkah Crafts Project for Kids
How to Decorate Your Locker
How to Make Your Backpack Look Cool
How to Make Papier-Mache
How to Make Christmas Photo Ornaments
Latest Blog Articles
@Home This Weekend: Chalkboard Wine Glasses
Handmade Gift Ideas: Wooden Chain
Handmade Gift Ideas: Upcycled Car Trash Bag

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.