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Topic: Adding Dimension  (Read 636 times)
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« on: September 18, 2012 08:44:05 AM »

Anyone have any advice about how to add dimension to your work?  I have completed a stitch sampler (so I know a couple of different stitches, nothing fancy!!), and want to start on something else.  I have a black and white zombie-horse picture that I think would be a good place to go.  It's a line drawing and I want to add some dimension to it, not just trace the lines, if you know what I mean.  Is there a book, or illustrations or some commonly held knowledge that might help me with this?  I don't want to be so elaborate that I give up (my common MO), but I want to have something I'm proud of when I'm done.  I"m not sure how to post the photo I have, sorry!  Any advice would be very welcome, Thanks!
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2012 12:19:52 PM »

Stumpwork includes several kinds of three dimensional techniques, including padding areas from the back and then embroidering around them, and making 3D wireframe things to add on (commonly stuff like butterflies and flowers).

You can also add random doohickies onto your work if it's more abstract, or to emphasize lines and shapes. I recently worked on a random fibre art piece where I took bits of shredded fabric and yarn, rolled it into balls, and then stitched the balls to my fabric. A lot of people like adding beads and sequins to their work. Also, more textural stitches can be used to create different effects, like herringbone stitch and feather stitch.

You could even fill it like a zentangle and get really abstract! Make it an acid trip zombie horse Tongue

This is a great opportunity to experiment with different techniques, so at the very least, you'll learn stuff Cheesy

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« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2012 02:54:28 PM »

Silk shading is a good way of adding depth if you are willing to fill stitch the whole thing. Otherwise you can use crayon tinting or go for a cross hatch effect with your embroidery.

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