A Crafts Community For Craft Ideas & DIY Projects - Craftster.org
Help | About | Contact | Press | Advertise | Terms | Site Map
Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
Random Tip: You can now organize your bookmarks into folders!  Read more here.
Total Members: 296,390
Currently Running With Scissors:
762 Guests and 33 Users
Home Craftster Community Crafting Articles Craft Tutorials My Craftster Crafting Calendar City Guides Craft Shop


Pages: [1] 2 3  All
Jump to page:
  Show Images Only     Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
Topic: Newbie asking a question on reducing "loose fuzz"  (Read 2928 times)
Tags for this thread:  Add new tag
Share the love... Pin it Submit to reddit add to Wists
1+
 
yingying
« on: May 27, 2012 12:58:49 PM »

Hello there!

I am a new hobby felting crafter, created only 3 pieces so far. I have a question about how to make the final craft clean without a lot of "loose wool/fuzz". This is a hedgedog picture I found online that I used as a sample. It looks so neat



And this is what I made. You can see there are a lot of loose wool sticking out. I tried to make it firmer, but it didn't help a lot. Especially the apple which is so hard that I can barely stab more. But it's still very fuzzy.



I wonder if anyone can tell me what I missed or did wrong. Thank you so much!
« Last Edit: May 27, 2012 06:08:14 PM by Belladune - Reason: to turn links into images for a new member » THIS ROCKS   Logged
suereal
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Im not crazy about reality, but its still the only place to get a decent meal-Groucho Marks
Offline Offline

Posts: 6445
Joined: 20-Apr-2010

Only the curious have something to find.


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2012 08:26:40 AM »

I have been wondering about this too.  Thanks for posting the question.  I hope we both get answers Grin
THIS ROCKS   Logged

To all past swap partners....If something I made you fell apart in some way, it would be helpful to me if you PMed me and told me about it.  Sometimes, I try new things, and if they fail, it helps me to know
Harlan
Offline Offline

Posts: 370
Joined: 22-Feb-2011

Author of "Needle Felting - to the Point"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2012 05:55:02 AM »

There are several ways to reduce the amount of surface fuzz on a piece.

When you begin finishing a piece the best technique is to use #42 needles at a very shallow angle AND positioned so that the first barb (which on a #42 is on the same side of the needle as the bend in the L at the top) is the first to enter your piece. I call this "Surface Felting" - your needles are almost parallel to the surface of the piece. This helps to catch a lot of those flyaway fibers and secure them into the piece.

Once a piece has been properly surface felted you may still find some flyaway fibers - it's pretty much the nature of the craft - and then your best tools are a sweater (or fuzz) shaver, or fine scissors.

When using a sweater shaver, do not apply heavy pressure on the piece. Sweater shavers are capable of shaving off more than you really want. You just want it to glide across the surface so that it can shave off those flyaway fibers and give your piece a nice neat finish.

Hope that helps! =^..^=
THIS ROCKS   Logged

You're unique! Just like everyone else!!
Prittens and other needle felted creatures
http://www.flickr.com/photos/prittens/
CraftArtEDU - exception classes from exceptional instructors
Intimate Forest - my oil paintings
http://www.intimateforest.com
http://www.craftedu.com
suereal
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Im not crazy about reality, but its still the only place to get a decent meal-Groucho Marks
Offline Offline

Posts: 6445
Joined: 20-Apr-2010

Only the curious have something to find.


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2012 07:58:21 AM »

Yes it does Harlan.  Thanks a ton for the info Grin.  Now if I can figure out what size needles I have I'll be aces.  I bought some at a yard sale mixed in with a bunch of other sewing things.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

To all past swap partners....If something I made you fell apart in some way, it would be helpful to me if you PMed me and told me about it.  Sometimes, I try new things, and if they fail, it helps me to know
Harlan
Offline Offline

Posts: 370
Joined: 22-Feb-2011

Author of "Needle Felting - to the Point"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2012 09:30:29 AM »

# 42 needles are very fine and the first barb would be on the same side as the bend in the L at the top of the needle - I've never found that first barb placed anywhere else on #42s

on #40s the first barb is "on the side" in relationship to the L at the top BUT

all you have to do is hold your needle so that first barb is closest to the surface when needling at a shallow angle.

« Last Edit: May 29, 2012 09:31:42 AM by Harlan » THIS ROCKS   Logged

You're unique! Just like everyone else!!
Prittens and other needle felted creatures
http://www.flickr.com/photos/prittens/
CraftArtEDU - exception classes from exceptional instructors
Intimate Forest - my oil paintings
http://www.intimateforest.com
http://www.craftedu.com
suereal
Friend of Craftster Friend of Craftster

Im not crazy about reality, but its still the only place to get a decent meal-Groucho Marks
Offline Offline

Posts: 6445
Joined: 20-Apr-2010

Only the curious have something to find.


View Profile WWW available for personal swaps
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2012 09:55:37 AM »

Ah!  Excellent.  I got a good visual with that last description, so I can see what you mean.  Thanks again Grin
THIS ROCKS   Logged

To all past swap partners....If something I made you fell apart in some way, it would be helpful to me if you PMed me and told me about it.  Sometimes, I try new things, and if they fail, it helps me to know
yingying
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2012 11:37:12 AM »

Thank you so much Harlan! This is a very valuable tip. And the idea of using a sweater shaver is quite interesting Cheesy

I wonder if by any chance that you have a book to recommend that contains these kind of tips and tricks? Like what type of wool is most suitable for which kind of project, how to estimate the size of the final piece by the amount of wool you start with (I have hard time making all 4 legs or the eyes of an animal exactly the same size), etc.? I have a few books that help you go through projects, but I feel like there are quite a bit of fine details/tricks missing. Thanks again! 
THIS ROCKS   Logged
Harlan
Offline Offline

Posts: 370
Joined: 22-Feb-2011

Author of "Needle Felting - to the Point"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2012 04:02:27 AM »

Yingying - I sent you a private message about books.

While I have worked with a lot of different fibers, I have my own favorites and I tend to work with Merino more than any other fiber. Merino is often not the favorite fiber of needle felters because it does require a bit more work (oddly enough, Merino fibers wet felt fast than most other fibers).

Which fiber to use is often just a personal choice. I prefer Merino because it produces a lovely smooth finish. I use other fibers for specific purposes such as Shetland for beards on small gnome figures that I make. The Shetland has a fine crimp to it and is just perfect for beards! It also makes for a very fine fuzzy surface similar to the texture you can see in my Happy Cat posted over in the Finished Projects forum.

Making objects of equal size is a matter of measuring the fiber. Fiber that has been carded and aligned to look rather like a long rope is fairly easy to measure. For example: you may start with a piece of rope fiber that is 8" long. That can be divided in half (lengthwise) so that you have 2 portions of fiber that are each 8" long. Those could be divided again and you have 4 pieces of similar size 8" long. There may be minor differences in the quantities which might become evident when the fiber is felted. The differences are apt to be small and you can correct any differences with small additions of fiber.

The batt fiber that I use is easy to pull apart and I can measure it easily as well. Generally with batting I'm working with sections of fiber that are 1" wide by 4" long or whatever I think I need for a project, but the way the batting is constructed allows me to easily pull off another piece of batting that matches the dimensions of my first piece of fiber.

When making objects that need to be of equal size - measure the fiber for all of the matching pieces at the same time - before making the first piece.

How much fiber is needed for any piece depends a lot on firmness. If you do not need a piece to be very firmly felted, it will require a lot less fiber than a piece that needs to be very firmly felted.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

You're unique! Just like everyone else!!
Prittens and other needle felted creatures
http://www.flickr.com/photos/prittens/
CraftArtEDU - exception classes from exceptional instructors
Intimate Forest - my oil paintings
http://www.intimateforest.com
http://www.craftedu.com
craftylittlemonkey
"Be yourself, everyone else is already taken." Oscar Wilde
Offline Offline

Posts: 6053
Joined: 03-Jun-2006


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2012 07:30:44 AM »

Hey Harlan, great info here. I'm wondering if all this info in is one or the other of your books, I've had them on my list for a while but frankly I'm a little intimidated by the whole needle felting thing. I need a workshop or something...
THIS ROCKS   Logged

The bad news: There is no key to happiness.
The good news: It isn't locked.
Harlan
Offline Offline

Posts: 370
Joined: 22-Feb-2011

Author of "Needle Felting - to the Point"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2012 08:05:42 AM »

Craftylittlemonkey -

Oh! Don't be intimidated!! Needle felting is such a great craft and it really is easy to be successful even as a beginner!!

When just starting most needle felters work on a foam pad - that's fine for starting out, but it is not the best work surface (a Clover brush mat is). Cover the foam pad with flannel. Eventually the flannel will need to be replaced, but it helps to prevent the foam pad from grabbing fiber. Don't felt TOO firmly - that's a common mistake beginners can make.

I'm a lifelong artist. I grew up with artists. I have studied art formally, but I learn best when I teach myself and I am very thorough when learning how a medium works. I also tend to think that people want to make their own projects and not copies of mine so when I share information it's meant to be useful for any project you might make.
THIS ROCKS   Logged

You're unique! Just like everyone else!!
Prittens and other needle felted creatures
http://www.flickr.com/photos/prittens/
CraftArtEDU - exception classes from exceptional instructors
Intimate Forest - my oil paintings
http://www.intimateforest.com
http://www.craftedu.com
Threads you might like:
Pages: [1] 2 3  All Jump to page:
  Send this topic  |  Print  |  Bookmark  
 
Jump to:  



only results with images
include swap threads
advanced search



your ad could be here!

How-To Videos
Designing a Pressed Flower Bookmark
Storing Pressed Flowers
Creating a Laminated Pressed Flower Bookmark
Creating a Pressed Flower Frame-Under Photo
Creating a Pressed Flower Frame-Over Photo
Latest Blog Articles
DIY Summer
Craft Challenge 101 Announced - Stash Buster
July 8, 2014 Featured Projects

Comparison Shopping




Support Craftster
Become a
Friend of Craftster

Buy Craftster Swag
Buy Craft Supplies
Comparison Shopping

Craftster heartily thanks the following peeps...
Moderators

Follow Craftster...






Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Copyright ©2003-2014, Craftster.org an Internet Brands company.