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Topic: Reducing one's fabric stash when one doesn't want to  (Read 1054 times)
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shayneblate08
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« on: May 27, 2012 11:38:26 AM »

Not sure where this goes but I'm sure we all have a little more fabric than our SO's/roommate's preference... I am moving to a new apartment in July and I have a ****ton of fabric. in fact, a lot of it is clothes that I want to reconstruct but there's also a lot of sizeable fabric (not just little scraps). Mostly all of it is from thrift stores as I can't afford to shop at the only fabric stores in my town (Jo Ann and Hobby Lobby) so I have this feeling in me to save all the fabric I can...

But I just have too much. And there's not enough room for it, the rest of my stuff, and the bf's stuff. Getting a storage locker is not possible and my parents don't live close enough for me to store the stuff there.

so what I need is advice on how to make myself part with some fabric.

I'd say I probably have 6-10 large plastic tubs worth of it (although its pretty much all on the floor and in corners and my closet). maybe more.
And I'd say I only have room for a closet's worth and possibly 1-2 tubs.

Thanks for any help
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rossie
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2012 04:03:31 PM »

Well that stinks!  Having recently undergone a similar exercise I have nothing but empathy for you.  I had to go from a whole crafty room to a corner of the main living area.  In a little apartment.  With hubby and 2 kids.  Not easy.

My advice; sort your stuff into piles.  For example,  Things you have immediate, definite plans for.  Projects you have started but know you are unlikely to finish.  Stuff that's pretty but you have no plans for or don't know what to do with.  Scrappy bits and pieces that you don't want to part with but take up too much room.     

Then you can prioritize the piles.  Keep the things that are most important.  Give yourself a limit - say, four boxes.  Get rid of everything else.  Be BRUTAL.  Something may have been a bargain, but if you're not going to use it it's not worth keeping.  Toss out any fabric pieces that are under a yard (or a metre). 

You don't have to chuck the rest in the trash, you can give it away to crafty friends, donate it (kindergartens/daycare love anything the kids can craft with), put it on ebay or have a crafty garage sale. 

A big helper is to limit the amount of crafty shopping you do.  I have a policy with shopping. If I want it, wait a week, and if I still want it, then it's worth getting.  If not, it wasn't that important and I can happily live without it. 

Good luck! 
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kstaron
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2012 06:51:29 AM »

First, go through and sort all the tubs of fabric. If you realize you have a whole bunch of colors you hate or fabric that you don't like sewing with or wearing etc., be ruthless with that and pitch it. The gross fabric you bought ages ago and still haven't found what to do with (not be cause it's too pretty, but because it's too slick, or too ugly) only hinders your ability to find great stuff to sew with.

Then take a look at everything that's left. Clip the seams off the clothes so you have fabric. (If you know what you want to do with something, just cut it out roughly now. you can save alot of space just by getting rid of the seams and such. like if you want to do a quilt with jeans fabric. Cut out as many of the squares now.)

Donate the scrappy, little pieces to an elementary school or day care. (Or someone who does stuff with small bits). With everything that's left, either roll them or fold them (With the assist of a wide ruler or notebook or something so they are a consistent width) and put the back in the bins. (Preferably with like fabrics together, so when you need a knit you know where to go as opposed to when you need felted wool or denim.)

Hopefully now you'll have a couple of tubs of fabric you LOVE, and will be inspired to craft with it instead of just collect it.
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mrsflibble
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« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2012 12:56:56 PM »

buy some vacuum storage bags. lifesavers!!!
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TwistMySister
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2012 12:06:34 AM »

Take 4 garbage bags and put a label on them "KEEP" "SELL" "GIVE" "THROW AWAY", dump all your fabrics on the floor, one tub at a time.

1. keep - pick out all the fabrics that are screaming at you to keep them
2. sell - pick out the fabrics that are too good to throw/give away but you just wont use them. Put them on ebay and sell as a bundle of fabric for $10 or something... or do a personal swap here on craftster.. not for more fabrics though!  Grin
3. give -put all your small bits and whatever else you will never want to use, and take to charity shop or kids school like above said. Recycle!
4. throw away - fabrics that are stained, ripped, ugly or too small to do anything with them, throw them out.

 Smiley
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Mrs Kay
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2012 07:53:41 AM »

buy some vacuum storage bags. lifesavers!!!

Ditto that. Vacuum bags (or even just zip-seal food bags with air squeezed out) are a godsend when you're short of space and can't bear to part with fabric. I have some under the bed!
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shayneblate08
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« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2012 08:11:04 AM »

buy some vacuum storage bags. lifesavers!!!

Ditto that. Vacuum bags (or even just zip-seal food bags with air squeezed out) are a godsend when you're short of space and can't bear to part with fabric. I have some under the bed!

I would, but I work for a professional seamstress and she tells me that its bad for the fabric to be stored in plastic.
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Mrs Kay
« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2012 12:52:40 PM »

buy some vacuum storage bags. lifesavers!!!

Ditto that. Vacuum bags (or even just zip-seal food bags with air squeezed out) are a godsend when you're short of space and can't bear to part with fabric. I have some under the bed!

I would, but I work for a professional seamstress and she tells me that its bad for the fabric to be stored in plastic.

Oh no! What is the negative outcome... does it weaken the fibres?
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shayneblate08
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« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2012 05:28:41 PM »

buy some vacuum storage bags. lifesavers!!!

Ditto that. Vacuum bags (or even just zip-seal food bags with air squeezed out) are a godsend when you're short of space and can't bear to part with fabric. I have some under the bed!

I would, but I work for a professional seamstress and she tells me that its bad for the fabric to be stored in plastic.

Oh no! What is the negative outcome... does it weaken the fibres?

yes. and since i'm making clothes to sell with my fabric, i can't, in good conscience, take that risk even if its a myth. i just do not want to sell someone something that might fall apart. it gives handmade clothing (and me!) a bad name. We work so hard to make what we make... I really don't know if its a proven thing... I just can't risk it.

One thing that I'm trying to do is rid myself of fabric that isn't big enough to make a garment of. so definitely anything smaller than a yard.

unless its leather, animal print, plaid, or shiny. then i just can't bring myself to get rid of it.

i also cannot bring myself to get rid of thrift store items that i bought to alter, and never got around to...
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lovesclutter
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« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2012 01:29:49 PM »

If plastic is so bad, why do the sell bedding sets in them? I use two of them for my good fabrics, keeps out the smoke, pet hair. Never noticed anything less with the quality.
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