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Topic: Help needed: How to fix this quilt  (Read 764 times)
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Lizy
« on: March 18, 2012 05:28:02 AM »

So I'm notoriously bad at choosing fabric for my quilts, and the current quilt I'm working on has some designs that are really bothering me, so I thought I'd ask for suggestions from more knowledgable types as to what I should do with it.

The actual pattern I'm working off says to lay it out like this:


Now, the pattern closeup looks like this:


So I thought maybe I should lay it out straight so that all of the lines were going horizontal... which looks like this:


So, do you think the goldfish are too much? Should I do the diagonal, the horizontal, or buy new fabric for the large squares?

Thanks!
« Last Edit: March 18, 2012 10:59:56 AM by MareMare » THIS ROCKS   Logged
JeanC
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2012 09:23:13 AM »

Ok, I'm not entirely sure what part of the design is not working for you.  Both the layout pictures look fine to me. I have a personal preference for an on-point layout - I just think it adds a little zest to the overall quilt.  I usually cut my setting triangles oversized so the center of the quilt "floats" on the background fabric.

Is the problem with the curved lines behind the fish?  That can be a concern but can be rationalized with "fish don't swim in straight horizontal lines and water currents move in different directions..." 

OR, if you have enough fabric and are brave enough and careful to avoid stretching the bias edges, you could cut the setting squares on a 45 degree (bias) slant and still have the lines and fish horizontal.

Obviously, if you opt for the straight settting layout you'll need to make more of the Bear's Paw blocks to fill in and I would add an extra row to balance out the 3-2-3-2 layout making it 3-2-3-2-3 which could seriously affect the size of the project. ;-)

Either way, be sure to post the result.  I can't wait to see it finished.

== Jean ==
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« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2012 11:01:13 AM »

I think either way looks fine! But I agree with JeanC, I like blocks set on point too!
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Lizy
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2012 02:52:09 PM »

Thanks for the help, particularly about the direction of the fish. I think I can convince myself of the logic of water-currents and fish swimming directions, but if I can't I have a fair bit of fabric and could always take my chance with the bias!

Actually, could it be interfaced with really light fusible interfacing to prevent stretching, or would it be better to leave it to chance and sew carefully?

And I probably will go with the on-point style, since that was what the pattern I'm working with called for anyway =)
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JeanC
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2012 04:22:03 PM »

Thanks for the help, particularly about the direction of the fish. I think I can convince myself of the logic of water-currents and fish swimming directions, but if I can't I have a fair bit of fabric and could always take my chance with the bias!

Actually, could it be interfaced with really light fusible interfacing to prevent stretching, or would it be better to leave it to chance and sew carefully?

And I probably will go with the on-point style, since that was what the pattern I'm working with called for anyway =)

I'd take a chance.  Don't press/iron until it's sewn in place and pin really well before sewing carefully.  Your side setting triangles will be your biggest issue since they're not entirely enclosed til the borders are on.  Press very carefully there. ;-)  Finger press then use your iron in an up and down on the seam only motion instead of sliding it over the fabric.  Good Luck.

== Jean ==
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