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Topic: Need help IDing and dating this wheel.  (Read 1253 times)
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lonegunga1
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« on: February 16, 2012 10:33:11 PM »

I recently inherited a spinning wheel from my grandmother, and it is in need of some TLC. I'm trying to figure out how old it is and what company made it (there's no logo I can find) because I'm pretty sure I'll need to replace several parts. Spinning is still very new to me, and this is my first wheel. As far as I can tell, the connector to the footman is leather and everything else is metal. Pretty sure it's a single drive scotch tension?

From the side:

Head-on:

mother of all:

... which hinges down, I guess to adjust tension on the drive band?

Maidens rotate to allow bobbin/flyer removal:

Every piece of metal on this wheel is rusted and I can barely get it to turn, and it needs a new drive band and brake band. The bobbin and flyer in the photos are the only ones that came with it, and though my grandmother had several spinning books (with copyrights back to the 70s) and an Ashford brochure, we couldn't find anything about the wheel's purchase.
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Belladune
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« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2012 07:18:21 AM »

Yes, it's most definitly a single drive w/scotch tension.  It does look very much like an Ashford Traditional, and if I recall corectly I don't think they used to stamp thier wheels that far back....
If you can find the same hinges, you could replace them easily.  And if you feel confident enough taking it apart, do that too, and rub off as much of the rust as possible and oiloiloil that wheel up!  It looks in really great condition, otherwise, with no pieces missing.

Also, the last 4 pictures are the same one Wink

Oh and Gratz!  She's a beaut!
« Last Edit: February 18, 2012 07:21:37 AM by Belladune » THIS ROCKS   Logged

SciFunk
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2012 05:00:50 PM »

I second the Ashford Traditional speculation. See this link, maybe it's the 1975 model?
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Blacksmith
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2012 10:36:38 PM »

Metal protection and restoration, a couple notes for you.

Firstly, I despise rusty things, doesn't jive with me and it's just as easy to ensure that it's not a problem in the future
*grumble* *grumble* *grumble* ....

Ok, restoration. Firstly, disassemble the thing, take all the rusty bits out. Iron oxide and most flavors of wood don't age well together when one starts to oxidize, and usually it's not the wood to rust.
I cannot stress this enough
TAKE PICTURES OF YOUR DISASSEMBLY!
TAKE NOTES! HAVE BAGS FOR PARTS!
DO IT WITH A FRIEND AND MAKE A DAY OF IT!

Ok, done shouting.
This is EXACTLY what I do when I'm doing anything that I'm uncomfortable with that is mechanical.

Now, for some of the tricks for restoration and possible salvage.
Dowels and a mallet or hammer. Use these to knock any parts that are pressed into place and stuck rather than hitting them directly. Lots of smaller impacts are better than one big one, and less likely to break something.

Any stuck screw, give the back the the screwdriver a light tap with the hammer while it is set in the head of the screw, this also tends to break any oxides that have bonded to the threads of the screw.

If you have to remove a piece of hardware from the wood, fill the hole with wood putty, your local hardware store should have it.

Normally I would suggest PB Blaster or WD-40 for loosening things up, but as those both contain several solvents that would eat wood finishes go visit your local pharmacy, mineral oil, not as thin, and certainly slower to penetrate, but usually safe for most wood finishes.

Rust is a pain in the butt, but you can do some to get things moving again after they are removed, here are a couple things you can do depending on what you're working on after you've got them off.

Boil the parts, swing the pH of your water over to acidic if you wish using either citric acid or vinegar, but regular ole H2O will do the job for getting the worst of it off. Baking soda added also does add a bit of removal power for getting crud off, esp anything petroleum based. Not joking, this works.

Dremel, wire brush, sandpaper, buffing compound, I suggest a rough wire brush to knock off any loose debris, then depending on the detail of the part, a stainless wire wheel on the dremel for finer parts, brass wire brush if it's not steel.
Larger items like rods and such, I suggest coarse steel wool for the initial rust removal, then medium, then scotchbrite pads for final buff and finish, silly but easier to use than 000 steel wool, also does a treat as a med-fine sanding pad for wood.

Plan of last resort:
If the two above can't get it done, shoot me a PM and I'll let you in on a couple other tricks I know.

Now, for keeping the parts that are not beyond repair from rusting up again I'm going to suggest a couple of odd finishes that I'm partial to.

'seasoning'
Take an oil (vegetable or animal) dunk the part bake at 350-400 for an hour, allow to cool, repeat until part is black. Same way you can do your cast iron cookware. I like this for parts that aren't going to see a lot of friction and I want to have that old 'antique' look, especially if they are old and antique. I'm partial to vegetable shorting for doing this. It will smoke, so if you can do this outside, do. Otherwise have very good ventilation in your kitchen.

If you want a particular color or finish on the hardware, let me know. I can manage to dig up a recipe to oxidize the surface in colors ranging from blue to red.

Waxes, oils, etc.
One really cheap lubricant that I adore, floor wax.
Before you send me off to the looney bin, try it. Most are made from the same wax as the stuff you put on your car, that is derived from the carnauba palm. Does great for low wear applications where you are going to see infrequent friction, the pivot points for the maidens seems like a good spot for this. As an added bonus it is really good for waxing floors, and any other wood items you may have lying about, like a spinning wheel maybe?

Ok, almost 2am, I'm done rambling for the night.
If you get stuck I'll be watching this post or pm me.
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Blacksmith
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« Reply #4 on: February 29, 2012 12:36:30 PM »

And this too
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=QOx5URgjTiU
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mullerslanefarm
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« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2012 07:52:29 AM »

Definitely an Ashford Traddy.  Here is the Assembly Guide.  If you need more bobbins or a maintenance kit, you can find it on their Accessory Page
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Cyndi

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« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2012 08:15:03 AM »

Curious as to how the refurbishment of this wheel is going, any change of an update?
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The bureaucracy is expanding to meet the needs of an expanding bureaucracy.-Oscar Wilde

Available for personal swaps, send me a PM. I make crafty tools!
breabadair
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2012 10:53:53 PM »

I have the same model spinning wheel. According to the Ashford website it's the 1975 ish model. Ashford sells a maintenance kit for it, which is awesome. With some help from my dad I got the kit and fixed up my wheel yesterday.

http://www.knitting-and.com/spinning/traddy.html

This website also shows pictures for doing so and some trouble shooting. I was finally able to spin on it last night for the first time ever. Good luck with the wheel. It's really fun once it's back into working condition.
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