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Topic: Working with Muslin and Calico  (Read 656 times)
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Captain Slow
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« on: February 15, 2012 03:02:28 PM »

(Just so you know, I'm going by the Australian / UK definitions for these fabrics. So:
Calico the simple, cheap equal weft and warp plain weave fabric in white, cream or unbleached cotton.
Muslin the very fine, light plain weave cotton fabric.
{Definitions taken from Wikipedia})


Hello fellow Craftsters,

I haven't used either fabric before in making clothing, and I just wanted to know some things before I start using them.

* Since they're both cotton, am I correct in assuming that they're easy to dye?
* How easily does muslin and calico fray?
* What should I do to reduce fraying in both fabrics, without pinking shears?
* Any other tips for working with muslin and calico?

Thanks in advance.
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« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2012 08:39:52 AM »

They should be easy to dye as long as you wash them first to remove any sizing applied at the factory and they're not marked as "stain resistant" or something similar.
Fraying shouldn't be too bad - from my experience, plain weave cottons stay together pretty well but you will want to finish the edges for wearing/washing. You can just use the zig zag stitch on your machine to go over them. If the fabric is sheer at all or you want a nicer finish than a zig zag, french seams work great (though not on very curvy seams).

Hope that helps  Smiley
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Captain Slow
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« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2012 01:05:24 PM »

They should be easy to dye as long as you wash them first to remove any sizing applied at the factory and they're not marked as "stain resistant" or something similar.
Fraying shouldn't be too bad - from my experience, plain weave cottons stay together pretty well but you will want to finish the edges for wearing/washing. You can just use the zig zag stitch on your machine to go over them. If the fabric is sheer at all or you want a nicer finish than a zig zag, french seams work great (though not on very curvy seams).

Hope that helps  Smiley

Thanks for all that. I think I might learn how to do french seams now, they sound helpful. Grin
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