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Topic: Help I can't seem to miter my corners correctly!  (Read 977 times)
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weluvzombies
« on: January 02, 2012 08:14:29 PM »

I have tried a few times and watched tutorials and cannot seem to get it right. Any tips or does anyone know of a step by step pictorial? I'm desperate here?
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Homerof2
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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2012 08:28:34 PM »

I've never used either of these links but they both look like they have good instructions and pictures.

http://quilting.about.com/od/bindingaquilt/ss/mitered_binding.htm

http://www.craftstylish.com/item/7082/how-to-make-mitered-corners-for-bindings
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Eamea
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2012 08:32:40 PM »

I love Julie's tutorials.  http://www.jaybirdquilts.com/p/tutorials.html

It sounds like you've looked around online, so I'm not sure I can say it any better, but I'll try. Smiley  When you are doing the first seam where you attach the binding to the quilt, you need to create extra in the corners so when you flip the binding to attach it to the other side there's plenty of material there and your corners won't round off.  Think of 45 degree angles whenever you think of binding.  It's how they're cut from whole cloth, it's how you join the strips, and it's how you fold when you're going around a corner.

When you are sewing the first side of a corner, stop stitching 1/4" (or whatever your seam allowance is) away from the the perpendicular edge and back stitch.  Fold the binding back on itself at a 45 degree angle, and then fold it forward with no angle at all.  If you imagine the number 7, you would have the rough edges along the top of the 7 first.  By the time you make the two corner folds the binding should lay with it's rough edge along the other side of the 7.

This is hard to express in words.  I hope it's helped, and at the very least I hope it hasn't made things worse.  If I haven't done a binding in a long time I have to stop and think about the joins every single time, but it comes right back.  If you could just see it in person I'm sure it would click right away.  Do you have a fabric shop nearby that you could ask?
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BlondGirl
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« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2012 01:02:12 PM »

First, stop what you are doing and make yourself something small to practice with.  Seriously.  Table napkins are perfect.  Miter the corners on a set of 4 that you can use in your lunch bag for work.  At the end of those 16 corners, you will have your miter technique down pat.  And you can make your coworkers jealous!  Small fast projects are the best for learning a skill before trying to actually do it on your quilts. 
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Here's my stuff:

http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=194777.0

Are you making a selvage quilt?  I have some to share. PM me.
weluvzombies
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2012 09:06:31 PM »

I should have mentioned I am practicing on small scale on pot holders. I will take a look at the video later. I spent a lot of time looking at tutorials and a few videos I just cant seem to get it right.
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mom2garrett
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2012 06:33:03 PM »

You are NOT the only one!  I have a quilt that I started in the early 90's that sat without a binding until this week!  I actually gave up quilting because of it, but this quilt stayed in a closet for years and even moved with me.  This fall, I decided I was going to figure out bindings if it killed me, and I decided to try with potholders first.  What a disaster!  I watched YouTube videos, looked at every tutorial I could find.  I even had a coworker who quilts explain it to me.  Turned out I understood the concept just fine.  I was just not being accurate with my measurements.  So.....I had some fabric my mom gave me--she gave up on quilting, too, and I made three little dolly quilts.  On the first one, I had ONE corner that looked decent.  By the third quilt, I had 3/4 corners looking decent.  You know what, though?  Five-year-olds don't care.  People who don't craft or quilt or sew don't even notice.

Then I realized I had a quilt that has sat for YEARS all lonely in a closet.  Quilts are meant to be loved, and I didn't love this quilt because it wasn't perfect.  Seriously....how dumb is that?  I was paralyzed by fear.  I finally decided this week to just jump in and bind that sucker.  I finished it last night, and I didn't even get a picture of it before my 10-year-old son grabbed it and ran off to his room!  To get it away from him, you'd have to pry it from his cold, dead hands. And you know what?  The corners look pretty good.

I think the problem with the potholders is the extra bulk.  It makes it a titch harder.  And yeah....I know "titch" isn't a real word.   Wink  My advice would be to practice on a set of placemats or mug rugs, and stop being so hard on yourself.  I was also shown the Creative Grids Angle Finder tool, and there's a YouTube video on that, too.  I haven't actually tried one of those, but I have a friend who swears by it, and she has a TON of rulers she's tried.

So just have a glass of wine and practice!  And remember we are harder on ourselves than the recipient of the quilt would be!
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« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2012 04:50:52 AM »

The secret to making a nice mitered corner is to not stitch all the way to the end of the quilt when attaching the binding. Stop about 1/4 - 3/8 away. Then do the flip turn of the fabric. When you start sewing again begin about 1/4 - 3/8 away from the edge. You'll be amazed at how much difference that makes.
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