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Topic: Keeping track of where you are... Tips?  (Read 1551 times)
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Feast Your Eyes
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« on: December 07, 2011 09:43:50 AM »

I am a fairly new knitter and I have been struggling with losing my place on my pattern or forgetting what I've done, such how many stitches or rows. What tips might you have for keeping track of where you are? Or what gadgets or tools are helpful?
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« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2011 11:07:05 AM »

When I knit a complex (for me) pattern, I write it out on a piece of graph paper so I can mark off the squares with a pencil as I do them.
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Lori1551
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2011 12:46:39 PM »

By your question I'm not sure if you are saying that you loose place on your project or on paper.  If there is a pattern in your knitting, for example a repeat of 10 stitches, put a marker at the beginning of each pattern so if you have to frog you will only frog up to the marker.  Now if there is no particular pattern, you could mark every 10 stitches you do, so that it makes easy counting.

Now if it is a pattern you are having trouble as to where you are, you can do several things.
1. Get a row counter and mark every row.
2. Use a piece of paper and write down every row eg: 11111 11111 11111 (this shows 15 rows)
3. put your pattern on a clipboard and place a ruler just under the row you are working on.

There are many other ways to keep track, these suggestions are only a few.
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soozeq
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2011 03:17:50 PM »

One thing that helps a lot is learn to read you knitting - which is a purl stitch, which a knit, and what decreases or increases look like. That way you can look at your sts and compare them to the pattern to figure out where you left off, count rows and stitches. I've never used a row counter, I'd probably forget to change it at the end of a row; most patterns are knit to a measurement anyway.

For complex patterns, look at the beginning of the previous RS row and check to see which row of the pattern begins with the same sts and there you are. With lace patterns, markers between the st repeats can help, though sometimes they may get in the way if you have to do a dec using both sts on each side of it.
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owlet
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2011 11:46:46 AM »

When I knit a complex (for me) pattern, I write it out on a piece of graph paper so I can mark off the squares with a pencil as I do them.

I second this, pretty much my way of keeping track where I am in my pattern. Priceless when watching a movie while knitting.
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Alexus1325
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2011 06:02:19 PM »

On the only sweater I ever crocheted, I put hash marks beside each line of instructions to keep my place. So if I needed to do five rows of "do this, do that," I would put a hash mark with a pencil right onto the pattern paper at the left-hand margin. If it was something ridiculous like 30 rows of "do this, do that," I wrote out the directions on a separate piece of paper so I'd have plenty of room for my little groups of five hash marks.

As far as stitch markers go, I simply affix a safety pin wherever I need a placeholder, such as the beginning of a round.
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« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2011 09:21:32 AM »

Thanks, folks! I have been doing the hash marks and I think I'm getting better at "reading" my knitting. I also write myself notes on where I am. I just didn't know if there was something extra that I should be doing. If I start doing color patterns I will probably do the graph paper. Mostly I was struggling with having to stop part way through shaping. I guess that's what I get for trying to make a sweater for my second ever project.
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gmatthews58
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2011 09:56:18 AM »

There are some really cool resources out there to help you learn to read your knitting. If you think following along with a teacher will help you should try video stitch-alongs. I have a DVD that is awesome, it goes with you row by row as you do a stitch pattern. There are some here: http://www.tricoastonline.com/blog/video-stitch-alongs-2/
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Tephra
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2011 05:17:04 PM »

Thanks, folks! I have been doing the hash marks and I think I'm getting better at "reading" my knitting. I also write myself notes on where I am. I just didn't know if there was something extra that I should be doing. If I start doing color patterns I will probably do the graph paper. Mostly I was struggling with having to stop part way through shaping. I guess that's what I get for trying to make a sweater for my second ever project.

For keeping track of shaping, such as armholes, get yourself a whole bunch of removable stitch markers. They don't have to be "formal" stitch markers, paper clips, safety pins, or bits of scrap yarn in a contrasting color will work. Every time you make a decrease/increase put a marker in the last stitch of the row. That way it's really easy to see if you need to work shaping again (such as every 4th row) or if you have done enough of them yet. If you have enough markers to leave them in when you are knitting other pieces it can also help you match up the shaping later when you seam things.
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« Reply #9 on: December 14, 2011 05:44:02 AM »

On a pattern, I seemed to have settled into the print a copy of it off or make a copy if it is a book, so it is easily portable, and then use a pencil to mark off rows on the pattern, or on a post it if counting rows.  I move the post it around to mark underneath a row I am last at if leaving a pattern for awhile, and for marking any changes I make (like making a flat sewn piece to a seamless in the round, etc), and I keep a journal for making notes for future - especially if I really like changes I have made to a pattern.
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