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Topic: Celtics Quilt Block Help  (Read 832 times)
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GiddyUpMunky
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« on: November 15, 2011 05:34:30 PM »

I want to make a quilt for my brother-in-law for Christmas. My plan is to make it with Celtics fabric, green fabric, and white fabric. I know what I want each block to look like, I just don't know what it is called. Could you help?



I just want to know what size to cut it to get an average sized quilt. Something to pull over you while you're on the couch. Thanks!
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anaximander
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2011 06:01:36 AM »

That looks like a modified log cabin, only done with split-seams, which may be why you're having trouble finding it. Split seams can totally be done, they're just kind of awkward to deal with.

For a comfy couch quilt for two people, I tend to go with something approximately "full" or "double" size, but I don't know approximately how big you're picturing these blocks to be, so if you want to give just a little more information, it'd be helpful in figuring out what you want. Blocks can be anywhere from an inch wide (realistically. They can be even smaller than that, just ask the insane women who enter things into major quilt shows.) to 20", 40" or more wide.

The way I figure out quilt sizes, because I'm really lazy, is to go to the warm & natural website (because that's where I get most of my batting), take their pre-cut size, and subtract 8" from each measurement (so you get 4" all the way around.) A double, in that case, is 76x88".In actuality, you have a lot of flexibility when it comes to a quilt, especially a couch quilt, because there really isn't a standard size at all.

If I was constructing this, I'd probably go with about 12" blocks, which would give you about 5 or 6 across and 6 or 7 down. It'd give lots of emphasis for the celtics fabric, and the big blocks means that you'd have less of the split seaming to do. (You're going to have to google for the split seaming technique. I can do it, it's a *giant* pain in the ass for me, but I have a hard time explaining it without pictures.)
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GiddyUpMunky
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« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2011 08:51:12 AM »

I was thinking 84" x 96" which I think is a Full Size. That size sounds like it'd work. I just don't know what to do from there? Should I draw it out so I can visualize it? Then how do I figure out how much fabric I need and everything?
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anaximander
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2011 11:15:57 AM »

Start by drawing it out, and making up a sample block using either scrap fabric or even just paper, so you can see how the seams will work and all. Even make up one block as a sample, and if you don't like it, you can turn it into something else. Keep in mind that you're going to need about to leave about 4" of batting all the way around the quilt, so if you want to do it that size, you're going to need at least a queen sized batting. What you need to figure out is what size block you want, and only you can make that decision.
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GiddyUpMunky
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« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2011 02:52:42 PM »

The celtics fabric I have is divided into a 2x2 grid that is 6 inches tall and 6 inches wide. You can see the same exact fabric here: http://lindaslids.net/product.sc?productId=174&categoryId=17 If I added the modified log cabin around it, it would come out to 8inches by 8inches right? Or I could double it so its 12in by 12in like you said. That'd probably be better. You are the expert so whatever you tell me will work, I'm willing to do it. I have lain myself at your crafty quilting feet. Smiley
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anaximander
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2011 04:36:31 PM »

Okay. Seeing the fabric really, really helps, thank you.

We've got a couple of options. First, we can throw caution to the wind and cut higgledy-piggeldy, not worrying too much if there's a half or a quarter cut off on one side or another. If doing this, I'd probably do an 8" ish square in the centre, with 2"ish around the outside (both finished measurements, so to cut them  you'd be looking at 8.5" and 2.5") This'll give you a few things - a bit of freedom from trying to be incredibly perfect, for one (and never underestimate the importance of that part), and a bit more fabric to play with (see below.) If you do this, all you need to do is make sure the lines are straight horizontal and vertical, not necessarily keep insane attention on where they fall.

However. I can see why you'd want to fussy cut it, and honestly, given the same fabric in the same situation, I'd do the same. In doing so, though, you're going to lose a huge percentage of the fabric in cutting the seam allowance. Those white stripes aren't wide enough for the seam allowance, so you have to cut each square 1/4" into the design all around the fussy cut block(does that make sense?). In order to deal with this, and to minimize the number of times you have to do this, I'd make the blocks a bit larger, make the centre part 12x12" and do 3" or even 4" finished strips around the outside. Yes, this makes for a huge block, BUT, you don't want to lose a huge ton in order to make sure the blocks are squared up, and to make sure  As nice as the fabric looks, the designers of this really make me rage by not making the white areas a seam allowance width.

If you're really dead-set on option 2, make a mockup block. It's crazy easy to make it into something else if it frustrates you (pillows, wallhangings, mug rugs, table toppers, whatever). You'll get a better idea of how large the block will be, and you can size it until it looks right to you (take 4 pieces of paper and put them as borders around the fabric, trying out different sizes until it feels right). Then try the piecing technique, which is legitimately a pain in the ass. If it's working for you at that point, totally go for it.

If it was me, I'd go with option 1. The chance of people noticing that the fussy cut block is screwed up is high, but if it's off cut and kind of uneven all around, nobody's going to notice if one seam is fudged a little bit or something. Moreover, I'm *extremely* thrifty (yeah. We'll go with thrifty. We'll pretend my friends don't openly call me Scrooge Smiley, and I hate wasting anything Smiley Either way, keep us updated as you go and post lots of pictures Smiley
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GiddyUpMunky
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« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2011 05:10:17 PM »

I think since I am a glutton for punishment, I'm going with option 2. I'm gonna make a few practice squares tonight and see how it looks. Will be back later with updates.
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GiddyUpMunky
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« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2011 07:21:50 AM »

Ok, so in an attempt to make a quilt block like I was visualizing, I messed up approximately 23423535634 times. So now I'm going to simplify it by having an 8x8 block with the 6x6 block inside of it. Should be simpler? I hope anyway.
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anaximander
« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2011 09:38:43 AM »

I'll cross my fingers. Really, with quilting, as with so many other things, as long as you have a 1/4" seam (so that the seams don't open in the future), if it's stupid, but it works, it ain't stupid. And damn near everything is fixable.
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