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Topic: Forfar Bridies with Whiskey Cream Sauce (Say what?!)  (Read 1858 times)
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jillybeans
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« on: October 05, 2011 08:27:27 AM »

Its strange that I've never posted in the cooking section when majority of my life falls into this category.  I'm always cooking and trying new things!  Time to post in a new section!

Last night I went on a journey of food exploration.  Last June, my husband's family all went on vacation at Ocean Shores, Washington.  There, we ate at an Irish pub called Gallaway Bay.  There my husband and I had forfar bridies (well, I had fish, but I liked my husband's so much that I ended up eating his instead ^_^) with whiskey cream sauce (which is to die for!).  Now you must be thinking, what is a forfar bridie?  Wikipedia's definition is a horse-shoe shaped meat product with a shortcrust cover, beef, onions and seasonings. 



Here is a brief story of its origin (from Wikipedia).  "The Famous Forfar Bridie originated in the early part of the 19th century [in Scotland]. One story of their origin is that they were made for wedding meals (the Brides' meal) hence the horseshoe shape (for luck). Another story is that they were made by Margaret Bridie from Glamis, who sold them at the Buttermarket in Forfar. James McLaren and Son have been making Forfar Bridies since 1893 and the present owner, Mrs Karen Murray, is the great, great granddaughter of the firm's founder James McLaren and the 5th generation of the family to run the business."

Well, I was sitting at work yesterday and was pondering what to make for dinner when all of a sudden I had a craving for that delicious meal I had at the Gallaway Bay and I was determined to try to replicate it from memory.  So I scoured the internet for recipes on Forfar Bridies and on Whiskey Cream Sauce.  I ultimately used a combination of recipes and my own additions for the bridie and one of the whiskey sauce recipes was right on.  Traditionally, the recipe doesn't have potatoes and carrots, but it is really good with them.  It gives it some more nutrition.

So here is my Forfar Bridie recipe:  (For all the cutting and cooking, this recipes took me a little under 2 hrs to make.  Some of the steps could be done ahead of time to save time, like all the cutting, and the filling could feasible be make ahead of time)

Ingredients:
Forfar Birdie
-1lb lean round bottom steak
-1 onion, chopped (I used 1/2 of a sweet onion, since we are not huge onion fans, but we are starting to like it)
-2 carrots, chopped
-1 large potato (I used a russet), baked and cut into small cubes (I left the skin on)
-1 teaspoon ground mustard
-1/4 cup beef broth
-1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
-1/4 teaspoon garlic powder (or more)
-1/2 teaspoon savory
-salt and pepper to taste
-1 1/2 lb of flaky pastry or, what I used to cut time, Pepperidge Farm's Puff Pastry Sheets (they are in the frozen food section with the pie crusts)
-egg or 2 tablespoons of butter for crust

Whiskey Cream Sauce:  (The one recipe doesn't make too much.  If you are planning to each both the Bridies, I would double this recipe so you have enough for both)
-3/4 cup beef broth
-cracked black pepper to taste
-1/2 ounce whiskey (I used Maker's Mark)
-1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
-1/2 teaspoon stone ground mustard (I used dijion, because that's what I had)
-1 tablespoon butter

Directions:
-preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit
-pull the pastry sheets out of the package to let them thaw out
-cut the meat into 1/2" pieces, tossing out the fatty bits.  Brown the meat in a skillet.  Once browned, put the meat into a large bowl, leaving the juices in the pan.
-put onion and carrots into the skillet and cover and cook until tender.  Pour all into the bowl with the meat.  Add the mustard powder, beef broth, Worcestershire sauce, garlic powder, savory, salt and pepper.
-lay out the pastry sheet and put half of the meat mixture onto it in a triangle shape and fold over the pastry.  Fold and pinch over the edges.  Cut two venting slits into the top.  Then brush the top of the pastry with either butter or egg.  (I did butter.)  Repeat with the second pastry.
-Place the two pastries onto a greased cookie sheet so that they aren't touching.  Bake in the oven for 30-35 minutes, or until the pastry is golden.
-While the forfar bridies are baking, make the whiskey cream sauce.  combine the broth and pepper in a small sauce pan.  Reduce to half.
-Add whiskey, cream and mustard.  Reduce to the desired amount.  If needed, add a little flour to help thicken up.
-Remove from heat and swirl in butter.  Allow to cool slightly to thicken.

I would pour the sauce over each piece as apposed to the whole Bridie, so that your leftovers don't get mushy.


Here are the two bridies.  Normally they are made into smaller, serving portions, but it was easier for me to do it this way and just cut it into thirds.


A better view of the filling.  It was so flaky and delicious!  It was exactly what I was looking for.  My husband started eating and told me he didn't realize he was craving it until he had started eating it. 

More fun facts from Wikapedia:
"In some establishments the contents of the bridie can be indicated by the number of holes in the top, one hole signifying that no onions are in the ingredients, and two holes indicating onions have been used."  I guess I did my slits correctly, since I added an onion!

Thanks for looking!
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SunflowerSmiles
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« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2011 09:03:27 AM »

YUM!   looks delicious!  anything wrapped in bread will make me swoon Grin Smiley  this would make me all out pass out for a few!
« Last Edit: October 05, 2011 09:04:02 AM by WildBird » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2011 10:04:13 AM »

That sounds delicious! I definitely need to try this.
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« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2011 12:16:51 PM »

That's looks so much tastier than every bridie I've ever had, I'd actually eat that.  Grin They are usually salty, dry, and fatty and really not worth bothering with. What was an Irish restaurant doing selling them?
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jillybeans
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« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2011 01:33:01 PM »

Thanks everyone!

That's looks so much tastier than every bridie I've ever had, I'd actually eat that.  Grin They are usually salty, dry, and fatty and really not worth bothering with. What was an Irish restaurant doing selling them?

Well, it seems that most people around here can't tell the difference between Irish and Scottish anything.  I use to do Scottish dancing, and we would get paid to do different gigs on St. Patrick's day.  Yes, its Irish holiday, and yes we are doing Scottish dancing to bagpipes.  Did anyone notice or care?  Nope!  ^_^  I think the Irish and Scottish just get lumped together here.

It was definitely not salty or fatty at the restaurant or the way I did it.  It wasn't even hard to make, either.  Surprisingly easy!  I can understand how they would be dry, because there isn't really a gravy inside.  But I think the whiskey sauce helps with that.  I don't know if I would be able to eat the bridie without the sauce.
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« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2011 02:46:04 PM »

Looks very impressive to me & just like the real thing!  Though I should point out that although I live in Scotland, I've never had a Forfar Bridie as I'm veggie! 

I think you might like Cornish pasties too as they are similar (though I realise that pasty means something QUITE different the other side of the Atlantic!).
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« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2011 03:02:04 PM »

Looks very impressive to me & just like the real thing!  Though I should point out that although I live in Scotland, I've never had a Forfar Bridie as I'm veggie! 

I think you might like Cornish pasties too as they are similar (though I realise that pasty means something QUITE different the other side of the Atlantic!).

Oooo those pasties look wonderful!  And you are correct, pasties here in the US are something completely different.  But I knew what you were talking about.  lol!

I bet you could still make this without the meat, just up the veggies.

I went to Scotland on vacation and I really didn't sample any of the traditional fare when I was there, well besides haggis at a ceilidh.  ^_^  I apparently had to have it here in the US in a small town on the coast.  If you know Twilight by Stephanie Meyers, Ocean Shores is a few hours South of  Forks, WA where that book takes place and that is where I had the bridie.
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« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2011 04:07:19 PM »

Love proper Cornish pasties! Theres a bakery that sells a Scottish twist on a cornish pasty, haggis, tatties and neaps pasty! Kiss
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