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Topic: First pizza using bread flour! Plus a question about thin crust pizza  (Read 2537 times)
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Ginerbean
« on: August 29, 2011 03:45:08 PM »

I used to just use a betty crocker mix and ever since I received a high quality pizza stone for my birthday this year I have been itching to try out a legit recipe! Voila! Here it is baking. I rarely get pictures of my food right after it is made because I devour them so fast. So sorry for the horrible lighting and quality!



It feels like a success... but I still have questions! I really love thin crust pizza but most of the recipes I've seen call for honey. Can this be substituted with white granulated sugar? I rarely have honey on hand... I just don't use it. Although I suppose I could obtain it if I knew what it was for specifically? Thank you in advance!
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In which I do it my own damn self (DIMODS?): http://ellipsus.blogspot.com/
tiffi_333
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2011 04:21:22 PM »

Ive never seen a dough recipe call for honey before...Im guessing that was to avoid regular sugar. Pizza dough only needs sugar in it to activate the yeast. You typically only need about a table spoon so im a bit surprised they would sub. honey for such a small amount. With thin crust sometimes the sugar is skipped as well so the dough wont poof up alot. http://allrecipes.com/recipe/new-york-italian-pizza-dough/detail.aspx That recipe should work well for you, the comments left by other people should let you know how it will turn out
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barbie820
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2011 04:25:19 PM »

yummy!!!!!!!!
if you really want to try the honey recipe, go for it. keep a small jar of honey around. it never goes bad, is good for sore throats, and excellent for splinter removal help.
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Goomba
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2011 07:18:27 PM »

Honey can be substituted in any bread recipe. However,the thing with honey is that that the yeast eats the sugar it can but leaves rest of the compounds which leaves you a slighter more flavorful crust that contains more moisture making it more tender. Sugar does much more then just help the yeast create gas, it slightly flavors the dough aiding in over all flavor;much like salt does.
I use honey in all bread recipes because it also aids in the lifespan so it is good for non pizza doughs...but yes...sugar will do just fine...
I just remembered that I made a pizza dough today that I didn't add honey to and replaced with sugar cause my sugar container was closer...replacing honey in a recipe

    1-1/4 cups granulated sugar
    1/4 cup water

Preparation:

1. Dump the granulated sugar and water into a bowl, and stir until well combined.

2. Then, replace the honey in the recipe with an equal amount of honey substitute.

*goomba*
« Last Edit: August 29, 2011 07:29:08 PM by Goomba » THIS ROCKS   Logged

Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you like and let the food fight it out inside.
Ginerbean
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2011 04:23:55 PM »

Thank you for the helpful responses! For the thin crust pizza recipe, I ended up using a substitution ratio of 1.25:1.0 (granulated sugar: honey) and added about a quarter equivalent of water to dissolve the sugar. The recipe that I used was this one (although I didn't do those toppings): http://chaosinthekitchen.com/2010/07/spicy-sausage-pizza/.
And maybe I will pick up some honey! I just didn't have it on hand and needed pizza ASAP(!!!!!!!!!!!) haha you know how that goes.

Honey can be substituted in any bread recipe. However,the thing with honey is that that the yeast eats the sugar it can but leaves rest of the compounds which leaves you a slighter more flavorful crust that contains more moisture making it more tender. Sugar does much more then just help the yeast create gas, it slightly flavors the dough aiding in over all flavor;much like salt does.
I use honey in all bread recipes because it also aids in the lifespan so it is good for non pizza doughs...but yes...sugar will do just fine...

 YES! This was exactly what I was wondering. I know that yeast need to gnaw on the sugar but I was wondering if honey did any thing special compared to sugar. Although maybe I don't really need an extended lifespan of my baked goods because as soon as something comes out of the oven I turn into a vacuum.

Actually, I do have ONE more question... Let's say, hypothetically of course... If you accidentally place the pizza on the stone too close to the edge of the stone (like it is about to drip off onto your oven door) and then ram the peel back under the pizza to try to shove it back further on the stone, and accidentally mess up your pizza and drip cheese on your stone... Is there any quick fix for this? My friend wants to know ( Wink) not me. I am the pizza master.
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In which I do it my own damn self (DIMODS?): http://ellipsus.blogspot.com/
Goomba
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2011 05:37:38 PM »

You should NEVER clean a stone. Water is just not good for em..the moisture setting inside could crack it and soap will stay in.

It is recommended to just bake it off. All of my pizzas are baked at 500, the few times i've had that very thing happen (not enough corn meal on my peel and it effed up getting the pizza off), I just left the oven on while we ate, turned it off once we got done and let it cool down. I pulled the stone out and was able to just brush it off with my hands. Your stone is going to get dirty, discolored and start to turn black...it's normal and is signs of a good stone...and will create deeper flavor.
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Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you like and let the food fight it out inside.
Ginerbean
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2011 05:45:31 PM »

WOW! not even water??? crazy. that's good to know! I heard about the soap thing. but I didn't realize water was bad for it too. I've actually been avoiding "cleaning" it anyways because the thing is so darn heavy and unwieldy hahaha so my laziness has been a good thing. WIN! thank you!!! is there anything you recommend scraping it with? is a metal spatula is okay? that's all I have currently
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In which I do it my own damn self (DIMODS?): http://ellipsus.blogspot.com/
Goomba
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2011 05:57:00 PM »

don't use anything other then your hands. an abrasive with scratch the surface which could create sticking, uneven heating, cracking and blah blah blah. haha
basically just bake on it until you can brush it off with your hand. from time to time I'll take a clean dishwashing brush to it...but mostly I just bake things off.



this is my stone, there usually isnt cornmeal sitting on it but I made pizza tonight. But you can see some of the stuff still stuck to and the discolor in it.
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Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you like and let the food fight it out inside.
Ginerbean
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2011 06:11:05 PM »

I'm really amazed at the delicacy that I have to treat it with! haha it's a STONE amirite? thank you! I, too, made pizza tonight so I suppose I won't be handling the bad boy til tomorrow. haha I'm actually glad that I can just brush it with my hands cause I can't afford any more expensive kitchen-ware! le sigh. and my stone is relatively new so it doesn't quite have that level of discoloration, but if it adds to the flavor, I can't wait til I make enough pizzas that my stone TURNS ANOTHER COLOR. awesome.

by the way, do you have any thoughts on preparing/baking the pizza on parchment paper? I've never done it, I usually just prep my pizza right on the peel. what does that do for the pizza itself? just easier prep?
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In which I do it my own damn self (DIMODS?): http://ellipsus.blogspot.com/
Goomba
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2011 06:17:18 PM »

I never prep on parchment. I could see it making it easier to move the dough around. I usually just stretch my dough on a lightly oiled counter top/ tossing until it is close to the size of my peel, i then lay it on the peel, stretch it by hand and then top it....I really need a bigger peel. 10 inches is not enough pizza.

really in the end, don't even think about your stone...just ignore it. Pizza shops clean their ovens with just a big ol brush and thats it.
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Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you like and let the food fight it out inside.
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