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Topic: simplicity 2207 collar help  (Read 1590 times)
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« on: August 21, 2011 08:25:55 AM »

I'm working on a costume using the jacket from simplicity 2207.
I'm not usualy a pattern girl but i wasn't sure i could get the right look or the collar without one. anyway ...
I'm having difficulty understanding the directions for the collar.
I know it's a costume, but i was hoping somebody who has made it, or somebody who has made another collared item might have some tips, advice or a clearer explanation for me.

Thank you.

the pattern:

the instructions:
I'm struggling with steps 6 and 7 on page 2.
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2011 04:34:16 PM »

For step 6, I think they mean for the interfacing to be out of the way, but I'm honestly not that sure. It seems ambiguous to me (and I've made men's shirts!). When they say stitch the facing to the collar, that's a fancy way to say put the two halves together. Cuz srsly, it's just two pieces that are identical (it's a Simplicity, the facing won't be smaller, like it should be).

Beyond that, the instructions are pretty stupid. In my humble man-shirt-making opinion, the front-opening facings should be applied first, and THEN worry about the collar. You need to do some fabric yoga. That stay-stitching is important because it marks your seam line. You're going to attach the underside (what they call the facing) of the collar to the neck edge first, without catching any of the upper piece. This will take much wiggling and some swearing, quite possibly. Then, you fold under the top part of the collar at the stitching line you made and press it to make a nice crease. Then you'll sew along that fold just a hair's breadth onto the collar to secure it. OR, you could do this the opposite way, securing the top half first, and then handstitch the bottom piece in using a ladder stitch.

Gosh, I hope that makes sense... If you can't figure it out, I REALLY liked the directions for making the collar in Simplicity 7030, a men's (and boy's) shirt and vest pattern. Thanks to those directions, making a shirt from a 70's pattern was easy Cheesy


Heeeeey, that printsew website is pretty handy!

Simplicity 7030 instructions
« Last Edit: August 21, 2011 04:36:44 PM by Alexus1325 » THIS ROCKS   Logged

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« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2011 05:18:07 PM »

Oh, wow, thanks for the link to Printsew!  Now I can just look for patterns I like and look them up on Printsew to see what the pieces look like to draft my own.  Hehe!  More free patterns!  Cheesy

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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2011 12:07:14 PM »

Thanks Alexus. after posting i had a good look at a commercially made shirt i have with front facing and started to comprehend. Having you put it in simple terms confirmed i was on the right track. The link to the shirt pattern was a bonus too!
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2011 02:02:38 AM »

OK so assuming you have got as far as step 5 and sewn along the seam allowance and clipped the collar in the right place...

#6 is telling you to turn the little flap you have made down at the seam allowance and press it, then trim it by about half. Then you sew the two collar pieces together on the other three edges, and trim those seams down so they are not bulky later. So you'll have the three sewn seams, and the open edges of the collar now where it will attach to the neck - one will look normal and one has this turned down and trimmed section right in the middle.

#7 is telling you to take the open collar edge, and baste it to the neckline (pin it with the doctored piece facing out towards you), but not to sew over that little flap you made. So you'll be basting the collar on but just gently holding that flappy middle part out of the way as you go by.

If you read on, you'll see that the facing gets tucked neatly away under that free edge a little later. Sometimes with lined jackets the collar will be the spot to turn the whole thing right side out at the end, but in this case the jacket doesn't appear to be lined.

If this makes no more sense than the pattern, maybe I can monkey with the diagram a bit. Once you get it, you'll *get* it, and it's a pretty standard instruction for a collar in most patterns I've seen.
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